#1
Is it more common to say C# Standard or Db Standard when referring to that tuning?

And also... is there any particular reason for this other than personal preference?


EDIT. The same goes for other sharp/flat tunings as well, of course. I'm just interested in this in particular.
Last edited by Edox442 at Sep 26, 2011,
#2
Flats are more aesthetically pleasing than sharps. It's also far, far simpler to write out Eb standard instead of D# standard; you just put 'b' at the end instead of changing every note and putting a '#' after it. Saves a lot of time I think.
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#3
Well they are the same note, it causes some confusion when you first encounter it. But It's just a way of saying it. I usually refer to them as flats, but if I'm talking to someone else who is musically inclined I don't really pick its whatever comes out haha
#5
I don't really know, but in my experience (with other music, not just guitar) I find myself saying:

Ab A B C C# D Eb E F F# G


So yeah I always refer to drop c#/c# standard. And then say drop d down a half step, or drop db if people give me blank looks.
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#6
It doesnt really matter, but to avoid confusion when writing notation, it should be Db, and every other unnatural note w flat

Edit; the idea is to not have the same of 2 notes in a major scale. It makes writing out music far easier. So, Db Eb F Gb Ab Bb C Db makes more sense than C# D# F F# G# A# C C#
.
There is a logic behind it.
Last edited by W4RP1G at Sep 26, 2011,
#7
C# in general is a pretty bad example since the scale it runs over is 7 sharps. Usually flats are used to describe tunings because you don't see sharp scales (there are only 2 Major scales, F# and C#).

Think of it this way, there are VERY few songs written in F# and C# major because of the sharp orientations, but there are a plethora of songs written in Gb and Db major for the same reason. Both C# and Db are the same scale, but Db is a lot easier to read than C#.
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#9
What does a guitars tuning have to do with the major scale? If anything, when you look at standard tuning, everything is tuned to fourths minus the G to B strings, a major 3rd between the minor 3rd and perfect 5th of E minor, not major.
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#10
Quote by engineno9
What does a guitars tuning have to do with the major scale? If anything, when you look at standard tuning, everything is tuned to fourths minus the G to B strings, a major 3rd between the minor 3rd and perfect 5th of E minor, not major.

And how is that more relevant exactly?
#12
Quote by VVolverin3
I don't really know, but in my experience (with other music, not just guitar) I find myself saying:

Ab A B C C# D Eb E F F# G


So yeah I always refer to drop c#/c# standard. And then say drop d down a half step, or drop db if people give me blank looks.

I'm with you on this one. There's no logical reasoning behind it for me, I just use Ab, C#, Eb and F#.
#13
I'm just getting at that these points for Db only really apply to keys or scales and that those arguments don't make any sense for talking about what notes are called what on a guitar because *deep breath* they are only notes, not notes as a part of a key or scale.. For standard tuning anyways.

/endrunonsentence
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#14
Quote by bdof
C# for standard tuning
Db for drop tuning


I do that too. Each has a nicer ring when saying it out loud.
#15
Generally how i talk about tuning etc. and how it makes most sense to me would be
in this case Db Standard.
For example if you start with an E and your tuning it down half a step your turning it flat. I don't say Im turning it down to a sharp of the lower note even though its technically the same thing.

I generally learnt to do that when talking about notes because it suggests which way the note is being changed even though it's all the same thing.
#16
Butt Rayge

I usually on day F# and refer to everything else as flat...it def is always persobal preference and who you play with etc. Im always tining down so why would i call it sharp? Lol. I play mostly Eb standard Db standard and drop B... So i will write it out

C Db D Eb E F F# G Ab A Bb B....its just how my brain likes to see it.
#17
I always say sharp instead of flat.  Tuner says sharp so that's what I go with.
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#18
I have always denoted them as A, Bb, B, C, C#, D, Eb, E, F, F#, G, G# - is there any logic to that or have I just learnt it in a weird way? I'm pretty sure I picked up that convention from somewhere.

So naming a tuning just uses the above notes - "x standard". A drop tuning "drop x" is just as simple, drop x means (x + 2 semitones up) tuning with a 6th string tuned to x. Seems simple enough to me.
Last edited by dragonzrmetal at Jul 26, 2017,
#19
Do not necro 6 year old threads.
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