#1
I know there are nylon and steel strings and that can make a difference but i was wondering if the brand makes a difference according to what style of music you play. I was using D'Addario light .012-.053 because they were cheaper but i was just curious so i bought a pack of the $10 martin marquis strings .0115-.047 and i could tell the chords echoed better, but how do i know if i should play thicker or lighter strings.
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#2
Yes, different brands will make a difference because they use different manufacturing methods to make the string.

Thicker or lighter depends on your priorities.

Do you want to play with a lower tuning? Use thicker strings.

Do you want to play in standard but have easier bending, less tension on the neck? Use thinner strings.

Do you want big, bold, warmer tone? Use thicker strings. You might try flatwound strings for this as well.

Do you want brighter tone? Use thinner strings and round wound strings.
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#4
if i were to go out, chop down a tree with a friend, and me and him proceeded to make our own baseball bats out of the tree, would i make mine different than his? hell yes.


strings are different. they don't all come from fairy string land, where the magic guitar fairies use their conjuring magic to make acoustic guitar strings. its the same thing with electric guitar strings. different brands sound different.
#5
well i pretty much play in standard but i find my strings sounding buzzy and dull after a few weeks so i change them often.
i dont know if this effects it but i do ALOT of palm muting like reggae and jack johnson style. i guess i just want the chords to sound as bright and crisp as possible but i dont what stuff i play in lower tune sound crapy.
ESP LTD EC-1000 vintage black
sunburst fender MIM tele
Epiphone LP standard ebony
Mesa/boogie dual rectifier
Mesa/Boogie .50 caliber plus head
Marshall JCM900 Hi-gain MII 2500
Fender Hot rod Deluxe
#6
guitar needs setup. use elixirs.

clean your hands before playing guitar, and use cleaning cloths after you are done playing.
#7
Quote by Cloudkicker
well i pretty much play in standard but i find my strings sounding buzzy and dull after a few weeks so i change them often.
i dont know if this effects it but i do ALOT of palm muting like reggae and jack johnson style. i guess i just want the chords to sound as bright and crisp as possible but i dont what stuff i play in lower tune sound crapy.

you say you play in standard, but now you are complaining about detuning? which is it?


and palm muting and crisp do not equal each other.
#8
Quote by 00_hns_00
you say you play in standard, but now you are complaining about detuning? which is it?


and palm muting and crisp do not equal each other.

i meen if i want to be able to play lower stuff too and higher stuff
ESP LTD EC-1000 vintage black
sunburst fender MIM tele
Epiphone LP standard ebony
Mesa/boogie dual rectifier
Mesa/Boogie .50 caliber plus head
Marshall JCM900 Hi-gain MII 2500
Fender Hot rod Deluxe
#9
??? you want to tune your guitar up? and down?


you realise that messes with intonation and action??? get your guitar set up for something and leave it there. thats why professional musicians have lots of guitars.
#10
Quote by 00_hns_00
??? you want to tune your guitar up? and down?


you realise that messes with intonation and action??? get your guitar set up for something and leave it there. thats why professional musicians have lots of guitars.



So I suppose amateur musicians that write/learn songs in up to 10 different tunings should have 10 different guitars. Calm down, his guitar will be fine.
#11
Quote by 00_hns_00
??? you want to tune your guitar up? and down?


you realise that messes with intonation and action??? get your guitar set up for something and leave it there. thats why professional musicians have lots of guitars.

They also have the cash/endorsements to do so.
#12
the biggest single change in tone i make to a guitar is changing the strings. for dull or boomy guitars, dr rares adds a brilliance and gets rid of the dullness. for brash, overbright guitars, martin silk and steels takes off the edge and adds a mellow warmth. the strings i like best on pre-war style parlors are d'addario pb's. and i dislike the sound of 80/20's on virtually every guitar i've tried 'em on.

btw, i do use different strings on different guitars for alternate tunings or due to scale length.
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Last edited by patticake at Sep 27, 2011,
#13
If you ask 100 different acoustic players about their string preference, you'll likely get a hundred different answers. It's highly subjective.
There are different gauges, different alloys used for the windings (all the steel unwound strings are pretty much the same, standard industrial "music wire"), coated, non-coated...

Most folks will unhesitatingly recommend what ever strings they happen to have on the guitar at the time. They are cheap enough to experiment with, feel free to do so.

Here's something to think about. Let's say you put a set of D'Addarios on your axe, and play them for a couple of months till they start sounding kind of ratty. Time to change strings... "Hmmm, think I'll try Ellixirs this time".
So, you take off the nasty old D'Addarios, put on the shiny new Elixirs, and WaLa! the guitar sounds SO much better.... "Wow, Elixirs must be the bomb!"
But do you REALLY remember what your D'Addarios sounded like when they were new, some months ago?
If you had put on a shiny new set of D'Addarios, or Martins, or whatever, they would probably sound pretty decent too compared to the ratty old ones.....
#14
Quote by Cloudkicker
I know there are nylon and steel strings and that can make a difference but i was wondering if the brand makes a difference according to what style of music you play. I was using D'Addario light .012-.053 because they were cheaper but i was just curious so i bought a pack of the $10 martin marquis strings .0115-.047 and i could tell the chords echoed better, but how do i know if i should play thicker or lighter strings.
I actually find this a bit hard to believe.

If you put an .11 to .47 string set, (extra light), on pretty much any acoustic guitar, it won't sound as full or rich as a light set, (.12 to .53). This is due to the fact that more mass is in motion, hence more kinetic energy, hence more activation of the sound board, hence more output. Plus, the thicker bass strings have more tension, and tend to be a bit cleaner.

I'd suggest you consider "Bikewer's" post above carefully, (# 13), as it probably hits the bridge pin on the head, as it were.

The only type guitars I'd personally equip with .47 bass strings are 12 strings, and that's simply because thicker strings are too hard to fret. Frankly, they sound like s*** on 12's s well.

As always, the disclaimer: "Your results may vary".