#1
So I know I've asked these same questions over and over but here it goes again. I've practiced my scales. Practiced my "modes."

http://i36.servimg.com/u/f36/15/26/35/63/scalec10.jpg

I used that to practice. And I know you guys say practicing scales will help with playing, but clearly it hasn't benefited me much. Maybe I'm doing it wrong? How are these scales and modes supposed to help my playing? I feel I've just hit a huge road block and the only way to get past it is to get these scales and chords, but they haven't helped me at all.
For how can I give the King his place of worth above all else
when I spend my time striving to place the crown upon myself?
#2
I seriously need to work on my theory, but really practicing scales and modes etc does two things in my mind. One it's practice so that's always good and usually involves lots of practice. Second, scales and such are basically road maps of your neck, some people never have music training and just through time and ear experience find these roads themselves. But a good background in theory, can change you from that bass player chugging along 4444222244442222 to something more creative easier that sets you and your band apart. (Massive opinion load) Maybe I'm like you maybe not, but I am def not the normal bassist or musician for that matter, in that I think virtuoso players really miss the point to me. They have technique, they have theory they have experience, but to me people like Victor Wooten, etc really just don't excite me, it's like they have so much skill and whatever there music always comes out sounding like elevator noise. Then look at punk, it's bold, rash, harsh and in your face, that guy is probably playing 4444222244442222. I think a happy medium, is being able to know your bass, know your music, and the key is to surprise not just your audience, but yourself. Too studied and you sound predictable, too new and you sound predictable. Ex. (laugh if you must) Mike Dirnt, he plays in one of the most bashed pop punk bands ever, that makes albeit today some groan tastic songs, but look at albums like Dookie, He made that album and he made Greenday, People might know the lyrics first, but they definitely know his basslines second, he's no Flea, nor is he Sid Vicious, he could have just as easily played root chugging punk, but his creativity made those songs memorable. (/massive opinion overload) So sorry if I'm off subject or flat out wrong.
Last edited by askrere at Sep 27, 2011,
#3
Learn what the notes are and how to highlight a progression with arpeggios/chord tones and using certain rhythms to utilize a certain feel.

Stay away from modes, 99.99999% of people who 'know' them don't know what modal music actually is, and odds are you'll NEVER encounter modes practically in any music. There's more music that tries to be modal and really just uses flawed CST than there is actually modal music.
modes are a social construct
#4
To be honest I think you should just have fun with scales, keep noodling, until you actually sound like you know your shit.

Also, I think I got tumors in my eyes from trying to read what askrere said.
#5
Quote by Hail
Learn what the notes are and how to highlight a progression with arpeggios/chord tones and using certain rhythms to utilize a certain feel.

Stay away from modes, 99.99999% of people who 'know' them don't know what modal music actually is, and odds are you'll NEVER encounter modes practically in any music. There's more music that tries to be modal and really just uses flawed CST than there is actually modal music.


That's not exactly true. The modes correspond to chords of the scale. So if you've got a V chord, you playing a straight major scale wouldn't sound right, you'd need to play mixolydian.

Modal music and the use of modes in popular music are pretty different. Modes are EVERYWHERE.
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#6
Quote by shmbluh12
Also, I think I got tumors in my eyes from trying to read what askrere said.

^lol

Scales will definitely help you know your notes on the fretboard. In my experience though, playing with people is way better practice. And if I can't do that then I try to play along with music I like to listen to.

Think of notes as the alphabet. You've got to know your letters before you can spell words(scales) and then you will be able to play riffs and/or basslines(sentences) and so on and so forth....

Try to learn some of your favorite basslines from ear and you will pick up on how different bassist compose different lines and melodies. Then you can develop your own style(more like it will happen naturally actually)
#7
Quote by Nutter_101
That's not exactly true. The modes correspond to chords of the scale. So if you've got a V chord, you playing a straight major scale wouldn't sound right, you'd need to play mixolydian.

Modal music and the use of modes in popular music are pretty different. Modes are EVERYWHERE.


Yes and no.

Yes, that if you are playing a V chord, you could probably utitlize the Mixolydian scale, but that is only really because if you are playing a V chord, you probably will be playing a dominant 7th chord.

Ultimately I would say, learn the chord tones (arpeggi) and how to use them in music. They are significantly more important that the scales.
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#8
So I should work on chords and playing by ear? Alright thanks guys
For how can I give the King his place of worth above all else
when I spend my time striving to place the crown upon myself?
#10
Quote by Nutter_101
That's not exactly true. The modes correspond to chords of the scale. So if you've got a V chord, you playing a straight major scale wouldn't sound right, you'd need to play mixolydian.

Modal music and the use of modes in popular music are pretty different. Modes are EVERYWHERE.


That's CST.
modes are a social construct
#11
just play scales with the notes out of order, if you get lucky it will sound like a song.
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#12
the thing with the scales is to learn how they are constructed, your intervals, the difference between major and minor.
and to say that scales are not as important as arpeggios is kind of silly lol.
thats like reading half of a book and saying you know the whole thing.
it makes no sence to only learn half of something, music is music, everything is applicable just as much as everything else depending on the situation. i love to use modes for metal, good for shredding lol

but defintely learn the construction of a scale, know what a minor third is and a major third and the difference.

look in the archives for a lesson called huge scale lesson for bassists and learn how to make your own chords and how to tell why each scale/chord is what it is and why it sounds that way

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#13
Quote by CJ Noble
just play scales with the notes out of order, if you get lucky it will sound like a song.


I do this all the time when jamming with new people or just improvin to a bassless track lol.
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#14
Quote by CJ Noble
just play scales with the notes out of order, if you get lucky it will sound like a song.

Done that before.

Video was neat.

I'll look through that thread and see what's up

Thanks guys.
For how can I give the King his place of worth above all else
when I spend my time striving to place the crown upon myself?