#1
Hey guys. Like the most people in this forum, I obviously want to record something. :>

Well, I've got a Marshall JVM410C. I've read a post which says how to record by using FX send plug (or whatever). I noticed that I have a FX send, and pre-amp send (or whatever the name is) plug. Now, can I basically plug my amp to my computer with one of these, and then (as far as I understood) load a VST cab (?) in eg. Reaper?

I'm really a noob on this topic, so I guess this'll help a lot (if I don't have to buy a mic, interface, stuff like that).

A link to a tutorial connected with recording by this method would be great! Thanks!
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#2
If you're going to record & want decent quality, you're going to have to spend some money. If you insist on using your PC, you'll need to ensure it's a pretty high spec PC unless you're only doing really basic stuff and will also need to invest in an interface to hook up to it.

You'll also need all the software required for recording, Reaper is an example of a DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) which can be used for free, although you are supposed to pay for it and you'll also need another package to programme drums on (assuming you want to include them).

Alternatively you can get a multitracker as your DAW which will do everything in a single unit. Some even include a built in drum machine so can do that for you as well. For a newbie to recording, this is definitely the simpler way to get going, and they can be purchased for a reasonable price, especially if you get a 2nd hand one from eBay or somewhere similar.

I'd recommend looking at the 8/16/24 track units made by Tascam, Zoom, Fostex and Boss. Zoom and Fostex are probably the simplest for a beginner, but they are all more than capable of matching anything a typical home PC setup can produce.
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#3
With a high spec PC, do you mean like a very good sound card or something?

Also, https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?p=26908063#post26908063 this is where I saw the guy use FX send into reaper.

I have pre-amp send, so can I use it in this manner? Or do I really need those interfaces?

EDIT: I remember in the past, when I just plugged my guitar into the computer, and used ASIO. Obviously, there was no distortion or such in Audacity (I think I used that), and I didn't have the nerves to fiddle with the settings to get distortion from ASIO in Amplitube. So I just quit doing it.

Will using pre-amp send already send the distorted sound, so I should just use LeCab 2 (as stated in the link in this post)?

Thanks very much guys! This is all just too confusing. I wish my father would find his great recorder which he had (the sound quality was really amazing).
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Last edited by Smaratelj at Sep 27, 2011,
#4
Yeah the preamp out will send the distorted sound pre-cabinet - ie what the sound would be without it playing through speakers - this will sound pretty nasty and grainy. You will need to add some cabinet simulator with an impulse to get this back to sounding acceptable once you have got the signal in the box. This isn't actually achievable in a multi-tracker so Gary's advice is irrelevant. You should still have an interface of some kind though because PC soundcards don't really have the best preamps/converters to record in an adequate quality for this sort of thing - have heard of people blowing soundcards up on what would be a routine operation on an interface line in.

Also if your JVM is a head, I might be stating the obvious but keep the cabinet plugged in as a load for the amp otherwise you might blow something up on that as well.
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#5
Okay, thanks man. It's a combo, but it still needs to be plugged to the 2x12 cab that's integrated, but I'd definitely keep it plugged. The last thing I need is to break that beast. :>
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#6
Quote by Beefmo
You will need to add some cabinet simulator with an impulse to get this back to sounding acceptable once you have got the signal in the box. This isn't actually achievable in a multi-tracker so Gary's advice is irrelevant.

It is with mine. And it was with the old one I had as well. It's never irrelevant to have a choice.
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Last edited by GaryBillington at Sep 28, 2011,
#7
I'll ask my dad if he can find his recorder, I believe it was a Zoom, or a Boss one. It really had a great sound quality, although I don't know if I'll be able to achieve that. Any tips for using them?

Thanks.
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#8
The same advice goes for any DAW, be it software or multitracker: Follow the manual and practice.

I always record drums, then bass, then all the guitar parts over it, presume most people do the same. Your first attempts won't be as good as you hope they will, but you'll improve in time.
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