#1
I've noticed that when I record, my microphone has a tendency of hearing my pick "flapping" after hitting strings. It is terribly noticeable in recordings, and typically occurs if I hit a chord really hard or if Im chug and alt picking really fast or aggressively. When I record, I have my 4x12 cab mic'd up. The room that Im in isn't very big; it is approx. 15ftx11ft or so, but full or furniture (bed, laptop, television, a couple chairs ect). I try to get as far away as possible (usually about 6 feet or so) and face away from the mic. Sometimes I open my door and play facing out the door, but my mic will still occasionally overhear my pick slapping the strings.

Is there a product I can buy, or a procedure I can follow that can reduce my mic's tendency of recording my picking sound?

Bear in mind that I am not referring to the sound of attack so much, like you often hear when somebody is doing a fast run up a scale with distortion. I enjoy that sound. But I am referring to the sound of basically the pick hitting the strings, and then slapping once it comes off of them, sort of deal.
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#2
Have you tried running from the amp's line out instead of using a mic?

It's either that or buy a proper studio mic which only picks up whatever it's pointed directly towards.
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#3
You either have to distance yourself further from the mic, or turn up your volume. I get that problem sometimes when I record in my bedroom. More volume usually prevents the pick sound from getting to your mic.
#4
Purchase a longer jack cable and play your guitar part in an entirely seperate room.

Or turn your amp up.

Or stand a matress up in your room and sit behind it to play your parts, that should prevent some/most of the sound from reaching your microphone. Alterantively, rest the matress against a corner and place the amplifer under it, and then the mic under there.
#5
Thanks for all of the prompt responses guys!

I cant get much further away because I have headphones attached to my interface so I can clearly hear the track Im playing over and what Im playing.

However, I'm pretty sure my amp has a line out and I think I have an extra cable. I might try plugging that directly into my interface and seeing how that sounds. Thanks for the input!
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#6
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Thanks for all of the prompt responses guys!

I cant get much further away because I have headphones attached to my interface so I can clearly hear the track Im playing over and what Im playing.

However, I'm pretty sure my amp has a line out and I think I have an extra cable. I might try plugging that directly into my interface and seeing how that sounds. Thanks for the input!


Probably sounds attrocious. If you were to take this approach, the best thing to do would be to simply record your guitar clean and use amp simulation software. If you know where to look there is quite a lot of good free amp simulation stuff out there.
#7
you're probly using a condenser mic, theyrevery sensitive and tend to do that when you record at low level.

I'd suggest getting a sm 57 for micing your guitar, as this one is very less likely to pick up your picking.

Recording your guitar directly in your interface, as other have pointed out, might give a weird tone and you might experience some latency issues depending of your hardware.
#8
Quote by ShevanelFlip
you're probly using a condenser mic, theyrevery sensitive and tend to do that when you record at low level.

I'd suggest getting a sm 57 for micing your guitar, as this one is very less likely to pick up your picking.

Recording your guitar directly in your interface, as other have pointed out, might give a weird tone and you might experience some latency issues depending of your hardware.


Im actually using a decent quality dynamic shure microphone. And I just did some research and have been finding a lot of sources stating that line-out recording isnt that great.

So right now my options seem to be down to cranking my amp, which is difficult due to my living situation, or finding some buffer to surround my mic and dull out the sound even more.
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Watterboy, I love you.

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You are now my favourite person on UG.....You write cool shit.

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#9
try picking nearer the bridge or using a different pick. a lot of recording issues can be resolved by simple playing adjustments
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