#1
So, my and my friends were at a chalet just chilling when someone brought the guitar. I'll cut the thing short.


I understand theory is important for building chords, composing songs and such. My friend told me any person without and theory knowledge can still play better than me in techniques. I don't have anything to hit him back. So i was wondering, what are the points other than those mentioned that makes you stand out with theory than someone who is an theory idiot even of he shreds the guitar faster than you?
#3
Well, theory lets you have an expansive knowledge of different progressions, and will give you much more room to work with: if you want to put a key change in a song, knowing that a ii V I will get you there is going to help, as is chord substitution and extended chords.

Theory allows a great deal of creativity to a player if they can use it right because you have many more options, and can write songs whilst knowing exactly what's going on in it. However, it can limit a player to shocking levels if they just use the same textbook chord progressions. As for the shredding side: you don't need to know theory to do that, but it helps as it will let you make educated decisions on say, where to use a Phrygian lick in a progression.

As the above comment says, you seem to make it sound a bit competitive, so here is some sound advice before you get all upset that you can't play at 15nps: the ability to write a good song is more important than the ability to play fuckoff fast.

At the end of the day, musicality is what is important: if it sounds good, it is good. I know I bang on about it, but so many musicians have forgotten it.
they're coming to take me away
ha-haaa
Last edited by Banjocal at Sep 27, 2011,
#4
So someone with awesome technique but no knowledge of theory can still be better than someone who is average on both tech and theory?

Btw I'm not talking about shredding only. I mean every technique, the ability to play songs and stuffs
Last edited by ThEgAmE93 at Sep 27, 2011,
#5
You can't say one way or another because it's subjective and it's a case by case thing. Personally, I think being well rounded is better than focusing on one area of guitar playing. But then again, that's for someone who takes guitar seriously. If someone just wants to play chords and sing songs, then theory isn't as important as technique is. But for someone who wants to compose a lot of music, music theory is a must because no one plays every instrument in an orchestra.
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Last edited by rockingamer2 at Sep 27, 2011,
#6
Quote by ThEgAmE93
So someone with awesome technique but no knowledge of theory can still be better than someone who is average on both tech and theory?

That depends on the subjectivity of "better." At the end of the day it is irrelevant. Many shredders forget about musicality and just play fast for the raw speed (inb4 the "no emotion" argument, that's not what I'm getting at), and this is imo fairly bad as you should put sounding good before sounding technical (for the record, you can be both).

Furthermore, it isn't about who is better, merely enjoying playing guitar. I can't shred for shit, but that doesn't mean I am a bad player, because I utilise my theory knowledge to make my soloing "spicier", write chord progressions which someone with no theory knowledge may not necessarily write as much and so on.

Also, before you obsess with soloing, get your rhythm playing down. The ratio of good rhythm players to good lead players is at a rough guess 1:10.

EDIT: in response to your edit, fundamental techniques like picking/rhythm and fingering chords is vital. You can get by just with that. More advanced techniques are less important but still valuable. If you wanna learn to shred, learn it. Just don't get hung up on being speedier than everyone else.
they're coming to take me away
ha-haaa
Last edited by Banjocal at Sep 27, 2011,
#7
Alright man. Because I feel MT is important. I just hope to know how to enlighten my friend.
#8
Quote by ThEgAmE93
So someone with awesome technique but no knowledge of theory can still be better than someone who is average on both tech and theory?

Btw I'm not talking about shredding only. I mean every technique, the ability to play songs and stuffs


Technique is what you use to play your instrument. Theory is what you use to understand what you are playing and to guide your playing. So someone with better technique will be better at playing guitar than somebody who has average technique.
#10
Alright man. Because I feel MT is important. I just hope to know how to enlighten my friend.


Just wait for the penny to drop. Someday he'll be sitting in a band practice and he'll realise how much faster he could learn things if he just knew how to play his chords over the neck, or how much easier it would be to improvise a solo if he knew where the chord tones were...

etc etc.

You don't need to convince him because it should be obvious how useful it is. I'll often be teaching a student and then I'll

transpose something to make it easier
play in harmony with them
play a nifty arpeggio line
play some lovely extended chords

and they'll see how useful it is.
#11
Watch this .

It's focus is on working with scales more than theory in general, but he does stress his belief that guitarists all too often focus on just shredding really fast more than anything else. Anyone can read tabs and practice for countless hours until they get their technique down solid; I'll be honest and say that is what I have done for the majority of the time I have been playing guitar. However at the end of the day you still won't understand how music works.

Also, someone who doesn't know theory will most likely have a hard time composing songs at an advanced level. What does it matter if a guitarist can play all of his favorite shreddiest, hardest, fastest guitar solos if he can't write his own?
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#12
Quote by Quintex
Music is not a competition.


I agree ^

and anyone who looks at it as competition has limited themselves because they will start to focus on the wrong things.

i used to feel competition between me and my two friends that played. it just ends up being a bunch of idiots in a room playing songs over eachother and trying to make eachother jealous. when this starts happening start asking them questions, learn all they have to offer, then leave knowing everything that they know plus everything you already know.

i love it when people do this. i always just say, "teach me that song." even if they are not "better" then me. I still get to learn a free song, and they look like the fool when i learn it in 7 mins. they realize they have been practicing it weeks.
Blues, classical, metal. Who says you cant love all 3?
Last edited by ThatDarnDavid at Sep 28, 2011,
#13
theory and technique both matter. as does written english, and not being a tool---music is not a competition.
all the best.
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#14
with techniqe it is always easier to play the stuff you want, without it you limit yourself to what you can physically perform
#16
I wouldn't try to convince him otherwise - what he does doesn't affect you. Just keep on doing what you're doing.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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