#1
http://soundcloud.com/garry-cho

I've been trying to write "film music" for a little while now. This probably one of the only ones I've liked.
I feel like I'm missing something for the 2nd loud part.

Any thoughts on this would be appreciated.
Thank you
#2
Absolutely interesting...

Creeping intro, catchy pizzicato transition between every other chord.
Later, this became a trademark for the high-strings.
Powerful chord progressions, interesting (guitar???)

Absolutely worth a lot of hollywood attention.

C4C? https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1483017
It is living and ceasing to live that are imaginary solutions. Existence is elsewhere.
#3
Absolutely interesting...

Creeping intro, catchy pizzicato transition between every other chord.
Later, this became a trademark for the high-strings.
Powerful chord progressions, interesting (guitar???)

Absolutely worth a lot of hollywood attention.

C4C? https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1483017
It is living and ceasing to live that are imaginary solutions. Existence is elsewhere.
#4
Sorry for double post. Dunno what happened.
It is living and ceasing to live that are imaginary solutions. Existence is elsewhere.
#5
Uploaded two more songs.
Feedback would be appreciated!

More 'post-rocky' than Film music.
But nevertheless, it's music I've written
#6
Currently looking for a person to see if making a video for "the Lost ship"
If anyone knows anyone that would be helpful!

not really in the position to pay..but full credit and constant advertising would be the use of this video just to get the name out there..
still working on new music...I only make music with the *spark* at the moment..but hopefully something will great will be the result of it
#7
Quote by fazgaz#
http://soundcloud.com/garry-cho

I've been trying to write "film music" for a little while now. This probably one of the only ones I've liked.
I feel like I'm missing something for the 2nd loud part.

Any thoughts on this would be appreciated.
Thank you


Good stuff! Stay with it! Listen to a ton of orchestral music. Get ahold of the scores and study them too.

Get this book: http://www.amazon.com/Study-Orchestration-Third-Edition-Samuel/dp/039397572X

My stuff is in my signature.


#8
Quote by Scott Jones
Good stuff! Stay with it! Listen to a ton of orchestral music. Get ahold of the scores and study them too.

Get this book: http://www.amazon.com/Study-Orchestration-Third-Edition-Samuel/dp/039397572X

My stuff is in my signature.



Thanks heaps!
Yeah I can't say I listen to A LOT of orchestral music.
I've liked the Pirates of the Carribean, Clint Mansell, Max Richter and Dustin O'Halloran and I guess i would cite them as inspirations for the making the piece as well!

Listening to your stuff at the moment
what equipment do you use?
is it very high tech or low maintenance?
haha I ask cos I want to use my low maintenance gear to the best of it's ability!
like I have a casio keyboard which I plugged directly into a mixer and then straight to the computer..
any tips or tricks that could help me up the ante on my production?

again! Thanks heaps for the advice and feedback
#9
Quote by fazgaz#
Thanks heaps!
Yeah I can't say I listen to A LOT of orchestral music.
I've liked the Pirates of the Carribean, Clint Mansell, Max Richter and Dustin O'Halloran and I guess i would cite them as inspirations for the making the piece as well!

Listening to your stuff at the moment
what equipment do you use?
is it very high tech or low maintenance?
haha I ask cos I want to use my low maintenance gear to the best of it's ability!
like I have a casio keyboard which I plugged directly into a mixer and then straight to the computer..
any tips or tricks that could help me up the ante on my production?

again! Thanks heaps for the advice and feedback


You bet!

Thanks for listening to my stuff too! It is, in fact, all I do for a living (composing, arranging, orchestrating; playing live and session; teaching, etc)! I'm very fortunate and grateful.

My rig is fairly complex, but being able to work with what you have is a good thing. Do what you can until you afford to step up to better gear.

I record in Logic Pro and my virtual libraries include:

East West Quantum Leap's Symphonic Gold (Orchestral); Symphonic Choirs; Voices of Passion; Storm Drum 2; Ministry of Rock (Rock instruments library-though i RARELY use it) and RA (a world instrument library). And: Spectrasonics' Omnisphere and Stylus RMX (with Bonus Spectrasonics, Burning Grooves and Funk City, among the extras within Stylus). As well as, a ton of sounds that come WITH Logic, Found Percussion and some others I can't recall right now. All on an iMac. I input every instrument on a MIDI keyboard, by hand, note by note.

Tips or tricks?

Man, I cannot stress enough working out the deepest possible study and understanding of sight reading, scoring things out in notation properly for every instrument, understanding the ranges, abilities and limitations of each instrument. I know it sounds overwhelming, but if you start diligently pursuing that knowledge NOW, you will be forever glad you did.

As I said, study scores of works with which you are familiar that are commonly available, such as something like Holst's Planets. It's available through Dover publishing:

http://www.amazon.com/Planets-Score-Dover-Music-Scores/dp/0486292770/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1358203285&sr=1-1&keywords=holst+planets+score+dover

Try and follow the score as you listen to get the general idea, and then go by even a cheap orchestration book to get you going. Something like this:

http://www.amazon.com/Essential-Dictionary-Music-Notation-Practical/dp/0882847309/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1358203417&sr=1-2&keywords=essential+dictionary+of+orchestration

Start writing exercises based on comprehending what you are learning.

There's also a terrific book by Doug Adams, who followed Howard Shore around while he scored the Lord of the Rings Trilogy. It comes with a CD of examples, temp tracks from the score PRIOR to them being recorded with the orchestra. Filled with score examples, descriptions of Howard Shore's process for developing themes. It's absolutely brilliant. Here it is:

http://www.amazon.com/Music-Lord-Rings-Films-Comprehensive/dp/0739071572/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1358203678&sr=1-1&keywords=Doug+Adams+Howard+Shore

Start writing THEMES. Just melodic sketches of themes. Maybe some accompanied with chord progressions. Write sketches of chord progressions, too.

Anyway, hope this stuff gives you some cool ways to further develop your talent for this!

Peace,

Scott