#1
Me and my mate who plays guitar jam alot but he always makes my bass lines for me and they always sound really good I dont like just route notes all the time its to simple and its boring. I can use octaves to make bass lines but what about slides and tappign and everything else.

I can play quite well for the time ive been playing but I lack the creativity to make anything is there anything you can learn that makes it easier to come up with stuff.
#2
coming from a guitarist who has studied bass lines: most important parts of basslines are hitting the roots and fifths of chords. when adding flair, think about chromatic runs going from chord to chord, hitting other chord tones or arpeggios, and dont be afraid to repeat a note (you dont need to always be moving). As well, you could practice adding bits of scales to runs (having a nice pentatonic riff can add to your run depending on what style you're playing).
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#3
Some tips (not hating on you)

1. Root notes are can be boring sometimes, but serve the song first not your ego
2. Tap and slap are cool but over done and over used sound like crap
3. Listen to music, Jam and practice, and the appropriate use of your skills will show themselves

As the bassist, you're in a very fun and unique spot that comes with it's challenges. You're the link between the drums and guitars, You stand out with a good EQ and tone alone, but a good bass line sets you apart tremendously, that's not to say you need to slap, slide, tap and overall muck around to stand out, that's the same frame of mind that pushes guitarists to endlessly solo and shred. A standout musician works to create a piece of music that works to support and play off of the rest of the music. Sometimes a root note run fits best, creativity isn't showing off, it's showing you can make something that fits and makes people say hey that band is good.
#4
What I usually do is concentrate on the root notes (or in it's defect, other chord tone - though if used wrong it can muddy things up. Use your ear.) and add passing notes and fills, the latter especially at the end of each phrase (8 bars fyi).
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#6
Quote by TK1
coming from a guitarist who has studied bass lines: most important parts of basslines are hitting the roots and fifths of chords. when adding flair, think about chromatic runs going from chord to chord, hitting other chord tones or arpeggios, and dont be afraid to repeat a note (you dont need to always be moving). As well, you could practice adding bits of scales to runs (having a nice pentatonic riff can add to your run depending on what style you're playing).


thats mostly a jazz or country take on it, the root 5 approach is also the easiest thing next to root notes, and then if you get into that you must know your chord tones and get into voice leading and stuff. and the always moving is refering to a walking bassline which are harder then they appear to be quite honest if your doing it right you must outline the progression and think about each note you hit.

But knowing theory really helped me alot for writing i think of them as writing tools.. scales and chords and what not.

but yea, find the root note, then figure out if the guitar player is playing major or minor or a certain mode or what ever.
then use the chord tones or scale notes and encorporate them into the proper timing and rythm.
and see what you come up with, that all applies to tapping and slap aswell

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#7
Whatever you do, don't just be one of these non-creative bass guys who just play the exact same notes that the guitar does. Make your bass stand out in your playing and you won't go unnoticed.
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#8
There are several ways to go:

Learn some theory, some things sound good others don't but there is no magic and a good grasp of music theory will help you understand why certain note sequences sound good and others don't.

Alternatively learn loads of songs, if you look at the bassline next to the chord sequence you'll be able to work out what the bass player did to make their bass line interesting. Homing in on the non root notes helps here. pinch the ideas and incorporate them into your own lines.

Fake it, play the root but vary the rhythm. Miss beats out from time to time. Add in the odd 5th, octave, 7th and third and you'll get away with it for most songs.

There's loads of theory in the columns if you dig it out.

good luck