#1
I went to the pawn shop the other day and they had a Martin D-15M there, it plays like a D-R-E-A-M and I am in love with the guitar. I haven't boughten it yet because I came home and wanted to do a little research on it, but one thing I noticed was that the pick guard was on the top(when you hold it right handed) like it would be for a left handed guitar, but they had strung it for right handed. I didn't realize this till I came home so I didn't even think to look and see how the bridge looked.

So my question is, if this is really a left handed guitar and it is strung right handed right now, will that mess the guitar up or will it be fine? Will the bridge have to be replaced and how much would it probably cost?

Here's a picture of it: http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=2459282688229&l=64ccda3db4

I have the serial number for it if that helps in any way. The guitar is in perfect condition and they're marked it down below what it's worth, so I just wanted to make sure I'm making a good investment here.

Thanks for any help!
#3
Even though it isn't a lefty, buy it. Consider it an investment. Least thats what I tell myself when I buy more crap :-)
#4
If you like it, get it. The only thing is that the guitar will probably get a few scratches from your pick. Otherwise, I don't see any problems.
#7
Quote by rageandlove110
It's not a lefty? The bridge angle isn't like a right handed guitar though



That does not matter
#8
Quote by Zeletros
That's not a left-handed guitar...
Well, YES, it is! I borrowed your "facepalm" for my reply.....
Quote by Zeletros
That does not matter

Yeah, the bridge does matter. Look up "intonation".


From a quick look, that's a left handed guitar already strung for a righty.

An instrument has to be very special to you, to start replacing bridges and whatnot.

At least IMHO Being a lefty I've struggled with restringing right handed guitars. They're never quite right. (accidental pun).

Even if you replace the bridge, there's the issue of the pick guard, the top nut, and the position marker dots on the neck binding still being wrong.

Edit: The top nut is likely already ruined by re-grooving it to accept the right hand stringing.

I wouldn't buy this guitar. As always, your wishes , wants, and course of action may vary.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 28, 2011,
#9
Quote by Captaincranky
Well, YES, it is! I borrowed your "facepalm" for my reply.....


I knew I wasn't crazy, lol

I called Martin and talked to a guy, he said that stringing a left handed guitar right handed will affect how the lower frets sound eventually and gave me a quote on replacing the bridge. After I replace the bridge it's cheaper for me to find a used right handed D-15 so I guess I'll have to pass. Thanks for the input anyway guys
#10
Quote by Zeletros
That's not a left-handed guitar...




How is that not a left-handed guitar? That is 100% without a doubt, left-handed.
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#11
Yep, that's a lefty Martin. On whether you should buy it or not, if you are good at setting intonation correctly and are able to file the nut down so the strings sit at a proper height, than yes it would be worth it.
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Gold jacket, green jacket, who gives a shit?

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#12
Quote by kingbabyduck
Yep, that's a lefty Martin. On whether you should buy it or not, if you are good at setting intonation correctly and are able to file the nut down so the strings sit at a proper height, than yes it would be worth it.


That would not work. The saddle is slanted towards one direction as can bee seen in the picture below.



The proper conversion from one hand to the other would to fill in the whole saddle slot with wood filler and then re-drill it with the correct saddle angle going the other direction. Only then would you achieve proper intonation. Just leaving it as is would not even come close once you went up the fretboard. The slant difference is quite significant.

This kind of conversion is usually very impractical as it would be a bit expensive to do. Even then, the bracing on the inside of the guitar will be all reversed. Bracing inside guitars are designed asymmetrically. There is a very real possibility that in more expensive guitars, they are acoustically tuned to suit the left or right handedness of the guitar.

There are other guitars where the saddle is sometimes just left flat across. Most often, these will be the through-type saddles in classical guitars(See below). It's rarer in steel-string guitars. In those situations, you can just file away and it would work reasonably well.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#13
Quote by Zeletros
That does not matter

Does the location of the scratchplate matter?
Actually called Mark!

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#14
Quote by steven seagull
Does the location of the scratchplate matter?
Ostensibly yes. This due to the fact that it would look stupid on top of the soundboard, and most of all, It wouldn't do anything. Most guitar players have at least some concern about the appearance of their instrument, and even more the functionality. So, the pickguard location on top of the sound hole is pretty much a fail on both fronts.

This thread, in general, has been fraught with poorly thought out responses, and on to outright misinformation.

As it stands, the OP has stated that he or she, has decided against purchasing the guitar. This renders many, if not all, comments moot.

I understand why an instrument would have a lower resale value than an identical, but right handed version. Since there are far fewer left handed players, limiting dramatically the pool of potential buyers. So, low price becomes the enticement.

Being a lefty, I have dealt with restringing right handed guitars to left hand use, and in general, it renders a half assed, ugly, and poorly intonated result.

The expense to have it done correctly is prohibitive, which makes buying a similar model that is right handed the more practical choice by far. It is granted, far worse with an electric guitar.

Even experienced members have oversimplified the issue of the reversed saddle angle in the guitar's bridge.
Quote by captivate
The proper conversion from one hand to the other would to fill in the whole saddle slot with wood filler and then re-drill it with the correct saddle angle going the other direction. Only then would you achieve proper intonation. Just leaving it as is would not even come close once you went up the fretboard. The slant difference is quite significant.
I'm sure "Captivate meant, "rout the new groove", rather that "drill". But, it does really abbreviate the difficulty associated with the bridge repair.


At post #9, "rageandlove110", tells us the purchase is dead....
Quote by rageandlove110
I called Martin and talked to a guy, he said that stringing a left handed guitar right handed will affect how the lower frets sound eventually and gave me a quote on replacing the bridge. After I replace the bridge it's cheaper for me to find a used right handed D-15 so I guess I'll have to pass. Thanks for the input anyway guys
I don't really have a problem with continuing the discussion for the sake of academia, if the rest of you choose to perpetuate it also....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 30, 2011,