#1
I had no idea where to post this.
So im looking for a recording program. I always hear "buy protools", "protools is the best" etc... Is this true? What programs would you recomend? I play mostly prog metal. This is just me recording in my bedroom, nothing professional. Thanks.
#2
Well considering pro tools is PRO tools... and you're asking for nothing PROfessional...
Is the answer clear yet?


But anyway, pro tools is great - it certainly will be more than capable of bedroom recording and mixing. Cubase is another good option, so easy to manipulate and use could probably get it free...
Always waiting for that bit of inspiration.
Last edited by W4T3V3R at Sep 28, 2011,
#3
Protools is the industry standard, but right now I'm using StudioOne Pro from Presonus. It's a powerful program, but very very easy to use which is great for starting out. Presonus hired the people who made Cubase 5, handed them a very large budget and that is the program that came out of it. The only difference between StudioOne Artist and Pro is that with Pro you can run third party VST's and the price
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#4
I always recommend a multitracker as they are a purpose built DAW. Contrary to what some of the more vocal people on UG believe, they are capable of doing everything for the home recording artist that the equivalent software packages can do.

I currently use a Tascam, but in the past I've also owned multitrackers made by Fostex and Yamaha, each of them served me well during the time I owned them.
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#5
tbh its all about the user and how capable you are, i've heard "professional" EP's that sound worse than what i make at college using direct input and VST's.
If you know how to use a great bit of software, then definitely make the most of high end products. If you're a basic user, there are more user-friendly packages out there.
Always waiting for that bit of inspiration.
#6
I went straight to Pro Tools after a few attempts and fails at going direct into my sound card. It is the industry standard so it is the one that is most wide spread. Cubase and Logic are ones that pop up quite a bit, I also hear that you can assign your own shortcuts in Logic which could be handy.
But yeah, Pro Tools is a great investment with the 3rd party plugins (Oxford and Sonnox among others are some of the best quality plugins around) and when I started using it I found that I could actually make a whole band with drum and bass plugins, so creatively it opens up a lot of doors.
#7
Quote by GaryBillington
I always recommend a multitracker as they are a purpose built DAW. Contrary to what some of the more vocal people on UG believe, they are capable of doing everything for the home recording artist that the equivalent software packages can do.

I currently use a Tascam, but in the past I've also owned multitrackers made by Fostex and Yamaha, each of them served me well during the time I owned them.


i agree. i use a Zoom digital 8-track and get great results. it's nice to use dedicated equipment instead of having to hope your PC can handle everything. has a uilt in drum machine and can do a programmable digital bass line as well (never used this function as i play bass on my own stuff). i run a Line 6 POD into it for my guitar and bass sounds and have had some good results (i'm still kinda new to recording in this manor). see my profile for some of my results.
#9
Lol, Hope your PC can handle everything?
You 2 talking about multi-trackers are funny.
You still using y2k proof computers?

If you're just getting into recording, get Reaper. Pro tools might be a little much for someone just starting out.


Make sure you get a proper interface.
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Last edited by Kyleisthename at Sep 28, 2011,
#11
I don't really like Pro Tools much because it just makes it sound too processed and perfect. That's just me, I listen to classic rock and like the raw sound.
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#13
Quote by ethan_hanus
Your DAW is only as powerful as the user, I know professionals that use Reaper and get professional results. Just cause people say it's the best doesn't mean it is the best.

I'd just get Reaper, you'll thank me later.

This. It's not like your sound will be any better because of the program, it just adds more features and compatibilties and whatnot, Reaper and audacity are both free, Audacity get's a lot of shit, but it's actually pretty robust, one of the easiest programs there is, and you can download plug-in's too if you use a lot of them. Like you said, it's all about the person using it.

I'd say Logic, Pro-Tools, Cubase, reaper, and audacity are the most popular, it's really down to preference.
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#14
Quote by Kyleisthename
You 2 talking about multi-trackers are funny.

Not sure why you'd find it amusing that someone would use the equipment built to do the job instead of using a software simulation of it.

I've had the for & against discussion a few times in these forums, so far the only thing anyone has said in favour of software which is a genuine advantage over multitrackers is unlimited tracks.

Unlike what some people will tell you, multitrackers have evolved since the old cassette based systems and are a genuine rival to the equivalent software packages.
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#15
I bought a microphone and a Saffire 6 interface that came with Ableton Live 8 Lite. It does the job for me, but I need to upgrade it for the music I want to make.
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#16
Every song on my profile was recorded in Audacity. The program is only as good as the user. I use a lot of shit and ill-purposed equipment on my UG recordings only to show people that their stereotypes towards equipment are only as strong as the users want them to be.
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#17
Quote by JustRooster
Every song on my profile was recorded in Audacity. The program is only as good as the user. I use a lot of shit and ill-purposed equipment on my UG recordings only to show people that their stereotypes towards equipment are only as strong as the users want them to be.

I like your attitude.
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Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#18
Logic.

But its mac only.

I like pro tools, its excellent software. And much more powerfull than your ghetto multitrackers. You're more than welcome to join the rest of us in the 21st century any time.

Avid are assholes though, at least you dont have to buy hardware for PT9. But £400 is asking a bit ****ing much...

Reaper is good, its free (well you can chose wether to pay for it or not), and it should be fine just for some home recording. If you want to get into recording engineering professionaly, you might want to try something higher end, as pretty much all digital studios are running pro tools/logic.