#1
Hey guys!

Been playing guitar for quite some time now, I don't really keep track anymore. Less than 5 years however. Anywho, I was making great progress in speed, until one day I woke up and my wrist, elbow, and ring and pinky finger had immense pain. Went to the doctor, all he did was give me a carpal tunnel brace (it no longer helps with the random pains).

And now I face another problem, I took a break from guitar for a few months to see if it got better. (it didnt.) Now the problem I face, is that at a certain speed (not sure what it is) my index, and ring fingers have no independence of one another. I've tried doing chromatic excercises, but it doesn't help. I really need some advice on what to do.

Being in a melodic death metal band, as both vocalist and rythym guitarist, this kinda well..limits me alot when it comes to my guitar parts.

So I really need some help on what I can try to gain some freaking dexterity in those two fingers.


Quote by Saint78
Jackal is like 90.

Quote by Jackal58
Buy stock in Viagra. Imma gonna fuck you in the ass.
#2
Well, the answer would be simply to practice it, but that's a very bland answer. Whenever i have a technique that needs refining, I choose a certain artist or just a song where the guitar technique is covered a lot (for example, Sylosis for down picking/galloping). I found by learning a song i enjoy makes practicing more rewarding and less of a chore.

In your case, considering you like metal I'd recommend doing some tech/progressive metal. The into for Swim to the Moon by Between the Buried and Me will really get all of your fingers going, and is also very intense on string skipping which you also might not get a lot out of from melo death.
#3
I presume you're already doing this about 10 mins a day? www.youtube.com/watch?v=CvhZ80OsuTQ

What you've really got is two problems - serious hand pain, and a speed barrier. I would rest and examine your technique till you solve the first. It's most likely bad posture or fretting too hard.

For the speed barrier, you just need to do lots of consistent practice.
#4
Take all of the power and speed out of your fretting hand and start from the very beginning.

Learn to control your finger pressure to such a fine point that you can purposely buzz your notes and then be able to apply pressure gradually until you can get a clean note.


Check out the way your wrist and finger are positioned, it's imperative that you keep your wrist straight when fretting and you don't bend it in any way because when it's bent, that's when the tendons are getting stressed.

You can work around this. Some guys at the Conservatorium I attend had RSI and tendonitis and the above worked for them.

EDIT:

Depending on how bad the damage is, it could take as little as 3 months to heal or it could take even longer. It all depends on how well you focus and practice the above mentioned advice. When I say all the speed and power, I mean all the speed and power.
Last edited by XianXiuHong at Sep 29, 2011,
#5
Quote by Freepower
I presume you're already doing this about 10 mins a day? www.youtube.com/watch?v=CvhZ80OsuTQ

What you've really got is two problems - serious hand pain, and a speed barrier. I would rest and examine your technique till you solve the first. It's most likely bad posture or fretting too hard.

For the speed barrier, you just need to do lots of consistent practice.



Basically yeah that's all of been doing lately but it doesnt seem to help. Maybe it's my wrist positioning, idk. It seems pretty straight to me... maybe I'm wrong, because occasionally I find my wrist bending and becoming almost parralell with the neck.


Quote by Saint78
Jackal is like 90.

Quote by Jackal58
Buy stock in Viagra. Imma gonna fuck you in the ass.
#6
Have you tried doing spiders for at least 2 hours a day?
if that doesnt get you results in around 1 month then there is somethign weird going on with your body..
#7
Basically yeah that's all of been doing lately but it doesnt seem to help. Maybe it's my wrist positioning, idk. It seems pretty straight to me... maybe I'm wrong, because occasionally I find my wrist bending and becoming almost parralell with the neck.


It could well be wrist position, if your hand is in a funny position, your fingers will find it hard to operate equally.
#8
Practice legato with the fingers you have problems with.

Start very slow so that your muscles can learn the new patterns.

Start with 60 bpm and do hamer on pull ofs anywhere you want to.

It will seem easy but think on long term.

You practice 5 minutes at 60, then 5 minutes at 70, then 5 minutes at 80.

You stop for that day. The second day you do the same thing.

The 3rd day you can start with 65 or 70 BPM and do a maximum of 30 bpm rais ( 10 bpm rause after 5 minutes).

It will take longer but this will help
#9
Quote by Scowmoo
Basically yeah that's all of been doing lately but it doesnt seem to help. Maybe it's my wrist positioning, idk. It seems pretty straight to me... maybe I'm wrong, because occasionally I find my wrist bending and becoming almost parralell with the neck.



You could try my advice too...just saying.
#10
Quote by XianXiuHong
Take all of the power and speed out of your fretting hand and start from the very beginning.

Learn to control your finger pressure to such a fine point that you can purposely buzz your notes and then be able to apply pressure gradually until you can get a clean note.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gr-ofdMrV-c What he says around 3:40 to 3:50 and 4:10 - 4:20
You could try my advice too...just saying.

+1

It's annoying, and fustrating when people, especially TS's just ignore probably the most useful post(s) in a thread.

Instead, they just suck up to the "Green" regardless. No offence meant, his posts are always helpful, but in general this is what happens ya know?
Last edited by mdc at Sep 30, 2011,
#11
Quote by XianXiuHong
Take all of the power and speed out of your fretting hand and start from the very beginning.

Learn to control your finger pressure to such a fine point that you can purposely buzz your notes and then be able to apply pressure gradually until you can get a clean note.


Check out the way your wrist and finger are positioned, it's imperative that you keep your wrist straight when fretting and you don't bend it in any way because when it's bent, that's when the tendons are getting stressed.

You can work around this. Some guys at the Conservatorium I attend had RSI and tendonitis and the above worked for them.

EDIT:

Depending on how bad the damage is, it could take as little as 3 months to heal or it could take even longer. It all depends on how well you focus and practice the above mentioned advice. When I say all the speed and power, I mean all the speed and power.


Sorry bro, didn't see your post. No hard feelings.

About keeping my wrist completely straight, does that even apply when switching strings?

Also, the doctor suspects it could be cubital tunnel syndrome. Soo..


Quote by Saint78
Jackal is like 90.

Quote by Jackal58
Buy stock in Viagra. Imma gonna fuck you in the ass.
#12
Quote by mdc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gr-ofdMrV-c What he says around 3:40 to 3:50 and 4:10 - 4:20

+1

It's annoying, and fustrating when people, especially TS's just ignore probably the most useful post(s) in a thread.

Instead, they just suck up to the "Green" regardless. No offence meant, his posts are always helpful, but in general this is what happens ya know?


You know it's very simple to not see a post. Just saying.

Sorry for the double post.


Quote by Saint78
Jackal is like 90.

Quote by Jackal58
Buy stock in Viagra. Imma gonna fuck you in the ass.
#13
Instead, they just suck up to the "Green" regardless. No offence meant, his posts are always helpful, but in general this is what happens ya know?




I don't know if he was sucking up but it's nice that you think I'm generally helpful. ^_^

Xian's post is bang on the money, if Scowmoo had any doubts about you "Blacks" then I'll put my big green weight behind it.
#14
Quote by Scowmoo
Sorry bro, didn't see your post. No hard feelings.

About keeping my wrist completely straight, does that even apply when switching strings?

Also, the doctor suspects it could be cubital tunnel syndrome. Soo..



Yes. You don't really ever have to bend your wrist for anything.

Review the way you sit and hold the guitar. You can drop your shoulder to compensate for your wrist to protect it.

It's how players like John Williams can keep playing so effortlessly and injury-free.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mysRRddARXk&feature=related

Watch that from 2 minutes in and you'll see his shoulder compensate for his wrist instead of having to bend it.

EDIT:

Quote by Freepower
Xian's post is bang on the money, if Scowmoo had any doubts about you "Blacks" then I'll put my big green weight behind it.



Thanks
Last edited by XianXiuHong at Sep 30, 2011,