#1
So I want to connect my amp to my pc and record. The problem is i cant hear myself when I do this. I cant hear how well my bends echo out and stuff like that. I have one output on my amp. And I don't know how to make the sound come out of my PC while im recording. ( Using Audacity )

Help !
#2
1) dont use audacity :p google reaper

2) you have to turn monitoring on to hear what you are playing, however if you are just recording with the line in on your soundcard you'll have to much latency (in that case: buy a recording interface)



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#3
Thanks dude, got reaper, found the monitor mode and actualy... i got this Asio4all driver and it actualy made the latency go away.. so I actualy have real time sound now haha, thanks!
#5
REAPER is amazing! I've been using it since it came out and absolutely prefer it to PT. You need to enable record input monitoring. In audacity it's under preferences like "play track as it's being recorded"
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#6
May have a look at Reaper 4 briefly in the near future, more out of interest than anything else, but I downloaded Reaper 3 and used it twice (one of which was to find the exact way to fix something for someone, as Logic did it slightly differently/with different options) and I have to say that I didn't enjoy it too much - probably because I have been using Logic Pro 8 since 2008, and am quite attached to it, though I do concede that back when I was new to recording and discovered Audacity while trying to record guitar demos/ideas, I would have benefited greatly from Reaper!


I will add that I am considering finally upgrading soon, purely as Logic 8 has no Elastic Audio-style time-stretching edit function and I am finding my desire for that sort of tool is growing ever-rapidly after going back to some old projects for fun and realising how much they'd have been improved had I the ability to slightly tighten the timing of the drums etc. When I do decide to upgrade though, I'm pretty much set on either sticking with Logic (Logic 9 is cheap as an upgrade through Apple Store, but Logic X is probably just around the corner so I'll wait until that comes out first to make a decision) or, assuming Apple mess-about too much with (read: massacre) Logic like they did to Final Cut Pro with Final Cut X, I may well jump ship to Pro Tools 9 now that Avid have realised that a fully native, high-quality DAW is the way forward at consumer-level, and removed all the limitations it imposed with M-Powered/LE.
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Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Sep 30, 2011,
#7
I think thats the one of the important reasons for not getting suckered into something like Audacity early on - you become accustomed to certain workflow elements in sequencers so that when you change anything else can annoy you, if your sequencer is extremely lacking like Audacity then this may bug the shít out of you if you transition at a later date.
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