#1
Basically I'm new to the solo guitar stuff, so far i've only played rhythm guitar and acoustic with either chords or reading off tabs. im looking into more complicated stuff than that, my question is:

if a song is in C and the rhythm guitar plays just the simple 4/4 with four bars of chords lets say C, Am, G, D; would the solo guitar just play solo's from (lets say) major scale in C key and in no other keys?

thanks.
#2
Over the classic C-Am-G-D key you could play the C major scale all the way or you can switch scale each time you change the chord. You can also use modes. There are endless possibilities.
#3
C major is all you need for that chord progression.
However, you don't need to reveal all notes in the scale at first, so you can use major pentatonic too.
If you dont mind learning some music theory, you could check out something called "modes".
A guy called Walliman on YouTube explains it pretty well.
If you know already what it is, then you could change between using C ionian, C lydian, C Mixolydian. It can make a solo a bit more intresting.
Not feeling limited to scales is a good thing. Just play what you think sound good.
#4
Quote by Adriatic
Basically I'm new to the solo guitar stuff, so far i've only played rhythm guitar and acoustic with either chords or reading off tabs. im looking into more complicated stuff than that, my question is:

if a song is in C and the rhythm guitar plays just the simple 4/4 with four bars of chords lets say C, Am, G, D; would the solo guitar just play solo's from (lets say) major scale in C key and in no other keys?

thanks.



The given example is a bit clumsy because you have a D, which contains tones D, A and F#. C major scale contains tones D and A, but it has an F instead of F#, so you could play solo in C major over that progression but you'd have to be careful of note selection over D chord. You can just play as if it's a C major scale, but use F# instead of F (that would be the tones of G major then).

I suggest that you learn notes on the fretboard, and then look at the chord shapes you learned and think about which notes each chord uses. Then it will be easier for you to know which scale to use for solos.
#5
You can play in whatever key you want. Music theory 'rules' recommend C. But don't let that stop you from trying something different.

If you dont mind learning some music theory, you could check out something called "modes".


+1. I definitely recommend learning some modes.
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#6
Another alternative is to use the scale shape of G major, and focus your playing around the C notes.
#7
Quote by thrashdeth

+1. I definitely recommend learning some modes.


Don't learn modes, these people don't know what they're talking about. You'll be in for a nasty trap in your theoretical understanding of music if you're told that modes even exist in tonal music (which this is).

Learn to use accidentals instead, though those are best touched upon when you have a reasonable understanding of tension and resolution and need a way to manipulate either of those two factors in a melody or progression.

TS, as above, learn to highlight your chord tones. You'll typically play in C major, but will need to use an accidental (F# instead of F) over the D to avoid dissonance in the major 3rd (unless you were to play a D minor instead, which would be diatonically accurate in this progression, though a II chord is perfectly acceptable as long as you highlight it correctly).
modes are a social construct