#1
I've been considering the idea of having a pedal specifically for creating a kind of string-like slow-gear, swelling effect. I've played with sounds like this before on fx processors, but I don't want it as part of a patch on a processor, I want to be able to stomp on a box and kick it in.

I did look online a little bit, and all I could find was: there's a really cheap behringer pedal that's supposed to do it, there's a Guyatone SV-2 that is supposed to copy the old Boss pedals that did it, there's a sound like that as one out of many on a certain line6 pedal, and some claim that the EHX Microsynth can be set to produce such an effect.

So my questions are (1) does anyone know of alternative options to the ones I mentioned? (2) is that behringer a piece of shit? I'm given pause at the idea of a 28 dollar pedal. (3) can anyone confirm that the Guyatone pedal does the job ok? (4) does the Microsynth really have the ability to invoke a slow gear effect? I haven't seen any example of it doing so in any of the demo vids.

And no, don't tell me to use the volume knob on my guitar or to get a volume pedal. It's not the same thing as an automated slow gear effect that reacts to your dynamics.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Sep 29, 2011,
#2
Couldn't you use an ebow?

Nevermind.
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Last edited by Jack Off Jill at Sep 29, 2011,
#3
Boss or Guyatone have slow gears that should work.
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#4
Quote by bluestratplayer
Boss or Guyatone have slow gears that should work.


From what I've read, the Boss ones went out of production a while ago, so it'd be close to 400 bucks to get one. I could be wrong about this though.

I guess I'm wondering if the Guyatone works *well*.

This may also seem finicky, but I was really banking on keeping my pedalboard purely true bypass as well. I guess might not end up being able to do that once I have all the pedals I need on it, as there may very well just not be true bypass versions of a thing or two.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Sep 29, 2011,
#5
Quote by Brainpolice2

This may also seem finicky, but I was really banking on keeping my pedalboard purely true bypass as well. I guess might not end up being able to do that once I have all the pedals I need on it, as there may very well just not be true bypass versions of a thing or two.


All true-bypass pedals is somewhat of a bad idea, since it means that your signal path is that much longer and you'll have significant treble loss. Get at least one pedal with a good buffer.
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#6
The Guyatone is better than the Behringer, or so I found out when I was researching this.

Also, having all your pedals true bypass is not a good thing.
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#7
All true-bypass pedals is somewhat of a bad idea, since it means that your signal path is that much longer and you'll have significant treble loss. Get at least one pedal with a good buffer.


Yea, I know that are trade-offs here, although I don't really like a lot of treble in the first place. In either case, I would be willing to have a pedal or two that aren't true bypass as long as they do their job well.
#8
If you're willing to put a little effort, you can get a high-quality clone kit for the Boss Slow Gear from BYOC. http://buildyourownclone.com/lazysprocket.html

These kits are fairly easy to build, even if you don't know how to solder. I bought a BYOC kit (the triboost) despite never using a soldering iron and after practicing soldering a few dummy wires, everything was fine. They use quality components and the pedals are all true bypass. I started with one kit, now I can't stop
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#9
Quote by SimplyBen
The Guyatone is better than the Behringer, or so I found out when I was researching this.

Also, having all your pedals true bypass is not a good thing.


While it might seem kind of silly (since price doesn't inherently determine quality), I already assumed that based on price alone (and I've had nothing but negative experiences with anything that has the name "Behringer" on it). The Behringer is 24 bucks at the first link on google! That's the cheapest pedal I've ever seen, cheaper than the Boss Super Overdrive. The Guyatone is 86 bucks. It also looks better. I'm just wondering if it sounds better.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Sep 29, 2011,
#11
Quote by Oldmonkeys
I'll be honest here, I've never actually listened to clips of the slow gear.

You don't need to listen to clips of the slow gear; you just need to actually read the OP.

Guyatone sounded fine to my ear when I tried one a couple of years ago. I much prefer the volume pedal approach myself, but it'll work fine.
#12
VFE Bumblebee seems up your alley - it's a Slow Gear clone with compressor built in. Not sure if you can use the swell independently of the compressor, but all you'd have to do would be to turn sustain all the way down.

edit: just read that you can isolate either effect or mix them. there you go. decently priced as well.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLcBYbXS7ng
Last edited by NakedInTheRain at Sep 30, 2011,
#13
I have the Behringer and it is very very good for the money. I probably wouldn't gig it, but I would defiently recommend it as a test to see if you would use it enough to spend more. If so you should look into the Malekko Onicorm A.D, which is essentially the same as all the other slow gear clones mentioned.
#14
Quote by NakedInTheRain
VFE Bumblebee seems up your alley - it's a Slow Gear clone with compressor built in. Not sure if you can use the swell independently of the compressor, but all you'd have to do would be to turn sustain all the way down.

edit: just read that you can isolate either effect or mix them. there you go. decently priced as well.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLcBYbXS7ng


From looking a little further online, this was one of the more compelling ones that I found. The only problem is that none of the websites that stock VFE pedals seems to have this one (although maybe one will if I look more), so I'd have to order it straight from them - and based on what's said at their website, the company itself functions on a order-to-build basis and warns that it could be a long waiting time.
#17
Quote by Brainpolice2
From looking a little further online, this was one of the more compelling ones that I found. The only problem is that none of the websites that stock VFE pedals seems to have this one (although maybe one will if I look more), so I'd have to order it straight from them - and based on what's said at their website, the company itself functions on a order-to-build basis and warns that it could be a long waiting time.

here you go buddy - http://www.ebay.com/itm/VFE-Pedals-Bumble-Bee-Swell-pedal-optical-compressor-1-Boss-Slow-Gear-/390348614266?pt=Guitar_Accessories&hash=item5ae2972a7a#ht_2112wt_1272
#19
Quote by Oldmonkeys
I'll be honest here, I've never actually listened to clips of the slow gear. but couldnt you just use a volume pedal plus a verb or delay to do this sort of thing?

This is by far the best way to do it. You have complete control over the swell and can even just do partial swells. You could also even use your volume knob. Take some time to practice it. A pedal that just does swells is a bit silly.
#20
This is by far the best way to do it. You have complete control over the swell and can even just do partial swells. You could also even use your volume knob. Take some time to practice it. A pedal that just does swells is a bit silly.


It's not the same effect as an automated slow gear with sensitivity to your dynamics, and added compression that allows the sustain necessary for a really long and powerful swell. I explicitly want the effect to vary depending on how hard I attack the strings. Furthermore, I've experienced slow gear effects in which the original pick attack actually comes through, followed by a swell. This can't be replicated with volume knobs or a volume pedal.

I suppose then that my ideal slow gear pedal would therefore include the equivolent of a wet/dry mix knob if I want the option of blending the effect with the normal guitar sound, adjustable sensitivity to attack, and control of resonance/sustain. It's something a bit more than just a regular volume swell.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Oct 1, 2011,
#21
Actually it would be more sensitive to your dynamics bec you control the swell. And for more sustain, why not get a compression sustainer pedal? The part where the original picking comes through before the swell could also be done actually with a volume pedal.
#22
Quote by UGBugs
Actually it would be more sensitive to your dynamics bec you control the swell. And for more sustain, why not get a compression sustainer pedal? The part where the original picking comes through before the swell could also be done actually with a volume pedal.

i think that information would've been more useful to TS two years ago.