#1
edited 10/07/11:

with the help of georgetd over at guitarattack, i figured out how to make it work. it was just a matter of capacitor value for the most part.
the following will work as a low pass, a hi pass, and if used both together you create a bandpass. pretty neat tones!
note - placing the hi pass capacitor on the opposing side as shown is important to keeping "full sound" when spun clockwise

Last edited by xadioriderx at Oct 7, 2011,
#5
It may have something to do with the value of the capacitor you chose. Did you use a .022uF? Maybe try a .01uF and see what that gives you. Also, try experimenting with the ground connected to the unused side of the pot in the first example.

Edit: For grins, if we assume an output impedance of 10k ohms on the guitar, a value of .01uF should give us a -3dB point of 1600 Hz, while a .022uF should give you a -3dB point around 700 Hz.

Did you not have any sound at all? What was the result?
Last edited by KG6_Steven at Sep 30, 2011,
#6
with a .022uf in line, there was full output (seemingly). with a 20pf, there was very veryyyyy little output. resistors dont really do anything lol

but yea ive been playing with it for the last hour or two, cant get it to do much. sad day!
i have .022uf, .047uf, and 20pf, and a selection of different random resistors, thats it lol

nothing i have works to make it happen. oh well =(

i dont have the right numbers to do this:
http://www.metalguitarist.org/forum/guitar-tech-electronics-diy/773-tight-control-simple-passive-bass-cut.html
Last edited by xadioriderx at Sep 30, 2011,
#7
you're just using the wrong values! You need one around .003uf or a bit less. The treble add in idea is extremely cool, and a similar thing could work with an inductor for bass. Also, higher value pots will exaggerate the effect better. It'll be really cool if you can get a bass cut and treble cut going because then you can do funky mid peaky sounds.
#9
Quote by xadioriderx
really, so my original diagrams will work with .003 caps? i need more caps!



You can never have enough caps. If you do get caps, get film caps with a J tolerance, tend to work the best in almost everything.

Doesn't the Fender Grease bucket tone circuit do something similar to this?
#11
Quote by LeviMan_2001
You could also use an inductor wired as a normal tone cap and it will behave as a hi pass. If you have an inductor laying around.


Those really aren't that cheap man. But that does seem like a cool idea...I should try it.
#12
this little power pack might have one. how do i identify one though?

oh got it, labelled with an L, ill have to look

no wonder this power pack was cheap, all the things labelled L are just jumper wires, no inductors!
Last edited by xadioriderx at Oct 1, 2011,
#13
edited first post so it works now. using the volume as the resistor, and a .001uf capacitor, it works as a hi pass. when combined with a low pass, you can choose high pass, low pass, or band pass (both down). pretty neat!