#1
Here's my issue. I sweat a lot on stage (gross) and i have a painted/gloss neck on my Ibanez. It's becoming a problem because i'm missing frets. I want to take the paint off and have a unfinished neck. How would i go about doing it or should i just take it to a specialist?

Cheers!
#2
I don't really know how to go about doing that, but I bought a bass and the previous owner had painted the neck with flat black paint so your hand doesn't stick to the back when you sweat and it seems to work pretty well.
#3
Quote by Inversemetal
Here's my issue. I sweat a lot on stage (gross) and i have a painted/gloss neck on my Ibanez. It's becoming a problem because i'm missing frets. I want to take the paint off and have a unfinished neck. How would i go about doing it or should i just take it to a specialist?

Cheers!


If you sweat as much as you say, you will completely destroy a unfinished neck in months - maybe a year. All a luthier would do is what you could do yourself. Sand down the finish to bare wood. Either adopt your play-style to your condition, or plan on a revolving credit/savings plan for replacement necks. There may be other alternatives to a completely unfinished neck (perhaps True-Oil or a wax)... but I have no personal experience with those so I can't say...
#4
Dont take the paint off, make the gloss finish satin.

Rub the neck down with 0000 steel wire wool.




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#7
If you sweat a lot having an unfinished neck is the last thing you want. That thing will smell horrid in a month or two and have all sorts of nasties growing on it. How do I know this? We (the local luthier I worked under) had the privilege of 'correcting' a Jackson that the owner removed the finish from the neck. Once we were through the green/tan buildup the wood underneath had a black stain that leached further into the neck than he was comfortable with sanding. I'm not saying all unfinished necks do this (I have Stu Hamm's prototype Urge I with a raw neck and it's perfectly fine) but in your case I'd strongly advise against it.

Take Absent Mind's advice with the 0000 steel wool. It's the least invasive method and will probably give the results you want. If not then you can still explore other viable options since the finish still exists on the neck.
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#8
Quote by Flux'D
If you sweat a lot having an unfinished neck is the last thing you want. That thing will smell horrid in a month or two and have all sorts of nasties growing on it. How do I know this? We (the local luthier I worked under) had the privilege of 'correcting' a Jackson that the owner removed the finish from the neck. Once we were through the green/tan buildup the wood underneath had a black stain that leached further into the neck than he was comfortable with sanding. I'm not saying all unfinished necks do this (I have Stu Hamm's prototype Urge I with a raw neck and it's perfectly fine) but in your case I'd strongly advise against it.

Take Absent Mind's advice with the 0000 steel wool. It's the least invasive method and will probably give the results you want. If not then you can still explore other viable options since the finish still exists on the neck.

that's why people generally seal it with tung oil after they finish this
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