#1
Oh, I know I made another thread but this is a completely different topic.

I was changing strings on my acoustic Yahama, it hasn't been touched since the late '70's.
First time changing strings on an acoustic, seemed fairly simple, at the headstock's it's just like an electric, only difference is you have to pull the bridge pins out with a plier.
Did the 2 thickest strings perfectly fine, but when I got to the 4th (3rd thickest ahaha shit I'm getting trippy no doubt you guise are), I actually crushed the bridge pin with my plier and the bottom end is stuck inside the hole, still securing the string.

I've got plenty of spare bridge pins for some random reason, but my main problem guise and gurls, is getting the bloody broken one out so I can put the new one in and and start busking on the street singing Avril Lavinge songs for fart bomb and icecream money (lokjokes).

Thanks Guise and Gurls.
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#2
just push it out from the underside of the bridge?

also, so this doesn't happen again, you should use some kind of bridge pin puller.. like on the end of a string winder or even better, the dunlop one that it also a bottle opener.
#4
Try asking the Acoustic & Classical Guitar forum instead of the Electric Guitar forum.

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Last edited by Vampire 255 at Oct 1, 2011,
#5
(3rd thickest ahaha shit I'm getting trippy no doubt you guise are)


and start busking on the street singing Avril Lavinge songs for fart bomb and icecream money (lokjokes).


Guise and Gurls.



All these are parts of your post that are annoying, but OT try using some tweezers maybe? Or post pics so we can see (in the right forum).
#6
To get to the underside of the bridge you need to take off at least 3 strings, preferably the 1st, 2nd and 3rd. Go through the sound hole and get a coin or a pick (I use a thumb pick) and find the end of the right bridge pin (pushed the wrong one out once when it had a string tuned in it. Not good). Push the bottom of it up with the coin or whatever you're using.

'Cos its broken I suspect it shouldn't be too hard to get out. If you can't you may just have to get it drilled out.

As a helpful tip, you don't necessarily need to remove the bridge pin to change the strings. You can just slot the strings from the underneath of the bridge by going through the sound hole with the non-ball end. Slot it though the groove of the bridge pin from underneath and then pull it through from the top when you can. You may need to slightly bend the top of the string so it comes out the top. I would only do this if you can't budge the bridge pin from underneath what so ever. It probably isn't good to leave bridge pins in that tight, but hey.

Good luck
Fuck the system - Use non-standard tunings!

"Now the guitar is no more than a cowbell, so easy to play, that there is no stable lad who is not a musician on the guitar" Inquisitor Covarrubias 1611
#7
On top of sticking your hand in with a coin to push the pin out, I suggest loosening that D string completely from the headstock side and then pushing it into the guitar towards the pin. Generally, this helps the pin release as there is no more tension.
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#8
Hi I dont know if this will help but this is how I get out bridge pins & have never had a problem.
If you follow this method you cant go wrong.

It is about getting the string end ball to move back into the guitar so the pin is then free to come out with just finger pressure. Same goes for the broken pin,, push the string back into the guitar (with pliers carefully) then it will be easy to get the broken bit out.



Oh remember to do one string at a time. dont pull them all off then restring. There are reasons. lol
Richard

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Last edited by Dix_Fix at Oct 1, 2011,
#9
That is the method I try first, but for many guitars that have had their strings changed a long time ago they can get VERY stuck in. Like I said in my previous post, a guitar that hadn't had its strings changed in 10 years couldn't even get the pegs removed from it, so I had to come up with the method of just pushing the strings in from underneath.
Fuck the system - Use non-standard tunings!

"Now the guitar is no more than a cowbell, so easy to play, that there is no stable lad who is not a musician on the guitar" Inquisitor Covarrubias 1611
#10
Mate that is crap!! if you use the method i suggested you can remove the strings of 100year old guitar that has been hide glued in,,, I have done it!!
Richard

Veni Vidi Vici

Head Drug Tester of Australians FTWclub
PM the_random_hero for entry

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to join!
#11
Haha, really? So you re-string antique guitars quite a bit then?

That method works great, but sometimes it doesn't work. I had to get my fingerpick (and then just push the strings up from underneath) to get the bridge pins out of my dads guitar that hadn't been changed for a decade. I always try that method first, its a pretty well known one, because its the normal technique, but sometimes, they do get stuck fast. I only call a bridge pin "stuck" when that method doesn't work.
Fuck the system - Use non-standard tunings!

"Now the guitar is no more than a cowbell, so easy to play, that there is no stable lad who is not a musician on the guitar" Inquisitor Covarrubias 1611
#12
Quote by Dix_Fix
Hi I dont know if this will help but this is how I get out bridge pins & have never had a problem.
If you follow this method you cant go wrong.

It is about getting the string end ball to move back into the guitar so the pin is then free to come out with just finger pressure. Same goes for the broken pin,, push the string back into the guitar (with pliers carefully) then it will be easy to get the broken bit out.



Oh remember to do one string at a time. dont pull them all off then restring. There are reasons. lol


This method has only worked for me for the lower strings, once you start getting to the B and E, they are too thin to push down, or my guitar is just crap and digs into the bridge, so I can't push them down.
#13
Yes that is often the case with the smaller gauge strings.



Fuzzynotry I have restrung 5 antique guitars for the NSW police bands memrobilia section. How many have you done?? & personally own 3 guitars over 30 years old which is getting old. Also have 2 electrics older than 30.
Dont get me wrong it doesnt mean that I havent broken bridge pins (or worse much worse) it is just this method works if you have dramas it is because of you not the guitar.
Richard

Veni Vidi Vici

Head Drug Tester of Australians FTWclub
PM the_random_hero for entry

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Last edited by Dix_Fix at Oct 2, 2011,
#14
Quote by Ultraussie
^^ How do i acess the underside of the bridge?
It's like a flat peice...
If a bridge pin has actually snapped off below the level of the bridge face, I expect you'd have to throw a small mirror in the body and perhaps tap it out from the bottom with a very small modeler's hammer. (Used sideways, not much room to swing ya know).

For getting very tight, (but unbroken), bridge pins out, I find a pair of miniature end cutters works well.

Just remember NOT to squeeze very hard on the cutters, or you'll cut the pin in half. Just enough pressure to engage the pin, and roll the pliers face gently across the bridge to dislodge the pin.

I suppose if you're a purist, you might place some cardboard on the bridge under the pliers, to avoid putting any nicks in the bridge.

Quote by ethan_hanus
This method has only worked for me for the lower strings, once you start getting to the B and E, they are too thin to push down, or my guitar is just crap and digs into the bridge, so I can't push them down.
Here I expect the pliers themselves might be the problem. The needlenose pliers need to close completely and still have the cross grooves nice and sharp on the jaws. Anything less, and you won't get sufficient traction on the thinnest strings to hold them. In short, a pretty new, and not used very much, pair of pliers.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 2, 2011,
#15
I'd like to also remind everyone that to ease future removal of the pins, they do NOT need to be pressed down into the hole with such force that the head of the pin is flush with the surface of the bridge. That's just asking for trouble. After all, it's not how hard the pin is pressed into place that holds the strings tight, but rather the wedge action of the ball against the side of the pin that creates the lock. Only press them into place until they stop. Also, many plastic pins get dented and deformed from this wedge action, making them quite difficult to remove. Harder materials like Tusq, bone and ivory are less prone to this and are therefore easier to remove once the lock has been broken, which is what Dix Fix is showing in his diagrams.
The ball ends are held in place by the lateral force of them trying to back out of the hole and coming up against the side of the pin once tension is placed on them, not the linear force of the string trying to come back out of the hole. So knowing this, it stands to reason that in order to free the pin, the lock needs to be broken first so that the pin can come out. This is accomplished exactly as Mr. Dix has stated.
I understand that there are guitars out there that are neglected and haven't had their strings changed in years, but those are the exception to the rule. A daily played guitar will/should have it's strings changed quite often, monthly or so, which gives the owner the opportunity to install the pins correctly and avoid these troubles.

As for the tools needed for stubborn pin removal, the side cutters work fantastic. Frank Ford of frets.com fame went one step farther with his and ground down the sharp cutting edges of his so that they grip, but don't cut into the pins. He is then able to use them as a lever to pry the pins up and out. He also uses standard sized cutters, not those miniature ones designed for delicate/small work. An inspection mirror is helpful, but not necessary nor is the hammer. A small needle nose pliers inside the body of the guitar to grab the stuck ball and loosen it up would be much more helpful and safe than banging around with a hammer, albeit a small modelers one. The problem is there isn't much room in there for much more than one hand and a tool of some sort. I prefer to do the majority, if not all, of the work from the outside and the methods described above will allow for this.
#16
Dix_Fix Stuck bridge pins is a pretty common enough problem, so it isn't just me. Sometimes they get stuck, and sometimes, you're method doesn't work- unfortunately. I'm not insulting you or your method, which cannot be said about you, just saying that sometimes that method doesn't work, as you can see by the high number of responses with different methods to deal with the problem: if it wasn't a common problem there wouldn't be so many different methods to deal with it.

Nor is your method worth reposting the picture twice. We have something called the scroll bar and can see previous posts....amazing thing really....
Fuck the system - Use non-standard tunings!

"Now the guitar is no more than a cowbell, so easy to play, that there is no stable lad who is not a musician on the guitar" Inquisitor Covarrubias 1611
Last edited by Fuzzywhynotry at Oct 3, 2011,
#17
Quote by LeftyDave


As for the tools needed for stubborn pin removal, the side cutters work fantastic. Frank Ford of frets.com fame went one step farther with his and ground down the sharp cutting edges of his so that they grip, but don't cut into the pins. He is then able to use them as a lever to pry the pins up and out. He also uses standard sized cutters, not those miniature ones designed for delicate/small work..
Well Lefty, the next time you see "Frank Ford of Frets. com", you tell him I said this, "if you use end cutters, as opposed to side cutters, you'd be able to pull the bridge pin straight out, (at a 90 degree angle to the soundboard) instead of holding a pair of side cutters parallel with the soundboard". Moving along, a pair of miniature end cutters will allow you to negotiate the rather small space between bridge pins on a 12 string. Oh, and did I mention, end cutters can be "rolled" across the face of the bridge, instead of digging the points of a pair of side cutters into the wood. Take note, you could also modify the jaws of a pair of end cutters, as easily as a pair of dikes.

I don't mind having my posts rebutted. Nonetheless, having somebody quote another person to do it, lacks a certain amount of taste. Bear in mind, you don't have to know all about something to have a web site, you just need a host server.


@ "Dix_Fix: "How many more times are you planning to post the same picture?
If a, "picture is indeed worth a thousand words", then you've already inundated us with 3000 words telling us that which we already know, what the bridge, strings, and pins of an acoustic guitar look like, and how they interact..
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 3, 2011,
#18
Quote by Dix_Fix
Yes that is often the case with the smaller gauge strings.



Fuzzynotry I have restrung 5 antique guitars for the NSW police bands memrobilia section. How many have you done?? & personally own 3 guitars over 30 years old which is getting old. Also have 2 electrics older than 30.
Dont get me wrong it doesnt mean that I havent broken bridge pins (or worse much worse) it is just this method works if you have dramas it is because of you not the guitar.


Who the *puut* cares, ever heard of variables, you are not the reference for every person on the planet. Maybe his bridge is different, other kind of material, has corrosion or maybe he is not just as pro as you are. Anyways no reason to go prancing around like a pink little pony because of your bridge pin removal skills, djeez.
#19
Quote by eSdaze
Who the *puut* cares, ever heard of variables, you are not the reference for every person on the planet. Maybe his bridge is different, other kind of material, has corrosion or maybe he is not just as pro as you are. Anyways no reason to go prancing around like a pink little pony because of your bridge pin removal skills, djeez.
So you went ahead and saved him the trouble of reposting the picture.

If reposting the diagram were a crime, that would be "aiding and abetting", whatever you're accusing him off. "djeez" to that.....
#20
Ok. I think this topic has been answered enough times now. I'm closing this before it gets nasty.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.