#1
Hey everyone, I'm really getting into playing guitar after about 1 1/2 years of just playing, and I want to learn Music Theory, scales, patterns, the whole damn enchilada. I've skimmed through Music Theory For Dummies at the local bookstore and it seems to cover quite a bit. Price for the book is no option.

What I'm asking is, what books do you recommend (yes, I'll be buying more than just one) for getting the ultimate in Music Theory practice, as well as scales, patterns, circle of fifths, and everything else I know not of?



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#2
Music: In Theory and Practice V1-2 by Bruce Benward. It's the textbook set I used in college and they're pretty fantastic.
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#4
Quote by BlackNapkin
Music: In Theory and Practice V1-2 by Bruce Benward. It's the textbook set I used in college and they're pretty fantastic.


I stand corrected. I only planned on paying ~$20 per book. I will definitely save up the money for the two volumes ($77 for V.1, so probably same for V.2 [Need around $160 + S&H...])

Anyway, thanks for the suggestion. I'm getting the Guitar Workbook as we speak.



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#5
Not to hi-jack this thread, but since its practically the same question I'll post it here since it could help the OP too, but is this http://www.amazon.com/Harmony-Theory-Comprehensive-Musicians-Essential/dp/0793579910/ref=sr_1_23?ie=UTF8&qid=1317525127&sr=8-23 book any good for like intermediate stuff? I already know the basics of theory like major and minor scales and chords and the like and am looking to further my knowledge
#6
I don't consider it a hijacking. I consider it sharing. I got the book suggested above (Guitar Fretboard Workbook by Barrett Tagliarino) an hour or so ago and I like it very much.



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#7
Any other suggestions?



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#8
From Arnold Schoenberg:
Preliminary Exercises in Counterpoint (I hate species counterpoint, but he gets away with it).
Fundamentals of Music Composition

From Paul Hindemith:
A Concentrated Course in Music Composition
The Craft of Music Composition


These are written by guys who actually have a place in music history and are not fly-on-the-wall Ph.D's who will never see the real workings of music no matter how many years they study. Avoid textbooks. Traditional academic theory obscure and grossly dumb down real theory. Also avoid jazz/pop books. They might SEEM more relevant and easier to understand, but they are incredibly limiting and create a very inefficient way of thinking about music with their overemphasis on modes, scales, and vertical harmony.


That's just my point of view. If you want to "know" what everybody and their quasi-musical brother already knows, then take the jazz/pop approach. There's nothing wrong with that if you are trying to be absolutely pragmatic. But if you are genuinely more curious about it on a deeper level, then go with my recommendations.
Last edited by Xiaoxi at Oct 3, 2011,
#10
Quote by Sean0913
If you go with any of these books and become a student, you'll be way into over kill mode.

Best,

Sean

Wrong.
#12
Quote by Sean0913
If you go with any of these books and become a student, you'll be way into over kill mode.

Best,

Sean


Not true. I'm reading Music Theory for Dummies and I'm actually getting it. I'm still working on getting money for your lesson.



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#13
Quote by Xiaoxi
Wrong.


Not wrong. Redundant.

If I teach him to name any triad in under a second, do you think he needs a book that's going to tell him how to use major 3rds and minor 3rds, in forming them, if I've already covered it as part of his teaching, and he can use it in real time?

If I learn how to write the alphabet, and communicate effectively, do I also now need a book that has the outlines of every letter in dashes so I can practice?

I respect your knowledge and posts, but this one was ignorant. Unless you didn't catch the idea of his "becoming a student", meant a student of MINE. In which case, it's a matter of syntax, and I'll take the hit for the misunderstanding.

If not, then it's an expression of ignorance about what I teach, and how I teach it.

Since I have the benefit of knowing how I teach, AND am familiar with books on music theory, having played and studied for 26 years now, my perspective is worthy of a more valid response than "wrong". I've been talking with Skittles, for several weeks now, and my comments were taking all of his needs and questions shared through those conversations, into context.

Right now, he just wants to learn, but he doesn't know that what I teach will make everything else out there redundant at best. At least, he doesn't know that *yet*.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Oct 3, 2011,
#15
Sean, it wasnt made clear by your posts or TS's that he is considering becoming a student of your academy.
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#16
Quote by Sean0913
Not wrong. Redundant.

If I teach him to name any triad in under a second, do you think he needs a book that's going to tell him how to use major 3rds and minor 3rds, in forming them, if I've already covered it as part of his teaching, and he can use it in real time?

If I learn how to write the alphabet, and communicate effectively, do I also now need a book that has the outlines of every letter in dashes so I can practice?

I respect your knowledge and posts, but this one was ignorant. Unless you didn't catch the idea of his "becoming a student", meant a student of MINE. In which case, it's a matter of syntax, and I'll take the hit for the misunderstanding.

If not, then it's an expression of ignorance about what I teach, and how I teach it.

Since I have the benefit of knowing how I teach, AND am familiar with books on music theory, having played and studied for 26 years now, my perspective is worthy of a more valid response than "wrong". I've been talking with Skittles, for several weeks now, and my comments were taking all of his needs and questions shared through those conversations, into context.

Right now, he just wants to learn, but he doesn't know that what I teach will make everything else out there redundant at best. At least, he doesn't know that *yet*.

Best,

Sean

Then it is merely a misunderstanding. I completely agree with your sentiment that naming names does absolutely nothing. That is exactly why I recommended the books that I did, because they are written in the spirit that semantics hinder musical understanding. But you, posting after me, seems to make a blanket statement that all the books mentioned above are useless, which is just not true.
#17
Quote by Hydra150
Sean, it wasnt made clear by your posts or TS's that he is considering becoming a student of your academy.


Fair enough, and that's why I left room for that in my response to him. I definitely said the words "Becoming a student" but the clarity of context may not have been understood by anyone but the TS.

Best,

Sean
#18
I wouldn't see it as redundant anyhow, any additional view and wording on the same concepts is helpful.
#20
Ok, what's "TS" mean? ...

Also, to clear it up... I am considering becoming a student of Sean's to better my music knowledge. I want to become a student, but am not financially available to make such an engagement at this time due to my girlfriend being pregnant.



Dysania:
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#22
I'm used to OP. But, now I know to use TS as well.



Dysania:
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For that exact shirt, click here




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#26
You should have a look at some chorales ( Bach etc. ). I didn't really enjoy it to be honest, but it helped me a lot.
Understanding them will give a huge knowledge about harmony, scales, key-changes and most important: how to harmonize a melody.
I used to have a pretty good book, can't find it on the internet though, but if you're interested i'll have a closer look.
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#27
Quote by Metalface213
You should have a look at some chorales ( Bach etc. ). I didn't really enjoy it to be honest, but it helped me a lot.
Understanding them will give a huge knowledge about harmony, scales, key-changes and most important: how to harmonize a melody.
I used to have a pretty good book, can't find it on the internet though, but if you're interested i'll have a closer look.


Hey could you pass some of that information along to me? I am currently developing an online course on counterpoint, based around Fux's book, but aimed specifically towards guitarists who have a recently acquired knowledge of theory, using a number of step by step tutorials and in depth explanations as to what is going on in each step (Sorry, though I promised it in 2011 it will probably not be launched online till the first part of 2012, its been absolutely busy around the Academy, and online it's just exploded this year, which is why many of you haven't seen me around as much lately).

I have been interested in these sorts of things (Chorales) ever since an interview we had with Diminished Fifth last year for the Academy, and so the name of that book/sourcing of it would be incredibly helpful, especially for some of my advanced students in Counterpoint here locally.

Best,

Sean
#28
Quote by Sean0913
Hey could you pass some of that information along to me? I am currently developing an online course on counterpoint, based around Fux's book, but aimed specifically towards guitarists who have a recently acquired knowledge of theory, using a number of step by step tutorials and in depth explanations as to what is going on in each step (Sorry, though I promised it in 2011 it will probably not be launched online till the first part of 2012, its been absolutely busy around the Academy, and online it's just exploded this year, which is why many of you haven't seen me around as much lately).

I have been interested in these sorts of things (Chorales) ever since an interview we had with Diminished Fifth last year for the Academy, and so the name of that book/sourcing of it would be incredibly helpful, especially for some of my advanced students in Counterpoint here locally.

Best,

Sean


Hey,

After some time browsing through google and Amazon I managed to find it : It's called 'A Student's Guide to Harmony and Counterpoit' by Hugh Benham ISBN: 978-1-904226-31-3

Click

It contains quite a few excercises of increasing difficulty, which give the needed experience harmonising
Playing/Hearing the chorales is also very helpful, I used following book, which was recommended to me by my music-teacher http://www.amazon.com/Harmonized-Chorales-Chorale-Melodies-Figured/dp/0793525748 .
They are pretty easy, even if you don't play the piano.

Hope that helps

-Ray
To Live Is To Die...