Poll: Vote
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It is digital or discrete
11 9%
It is analog or continuous
34 27%
It is digital, but can have analog characteristics (or vice versa)
10 8%
Other
8 6%
Nig, how the fuk I'm supposed to know?!
63 50%
Voters: 126.
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#1
Sorry about the lame title of this thread. It's hard to use words like Universe or Reality without it sounding like some introduction to stoner philosophy. But here's the topic of this thread.

Do you think the universe, reality, and all the good stuff, is digital or analog? Discrete or continuous?

Can't say I'm an expert on quantum mechanics or digital physics, but I'm interested to see debate this thread might stir up.

Wiki article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_physics
Last edited by The Madcap at Oct 2, 2011,
#4
It's all a computer simulation.
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#8
When I think of the minute details of the universe, I see it being very "digital".

Like you, I'm not well grounded in any topic on the matter (as much as I'd like to be), but when I think of evolution, or cosmic material forming/bonding, etc. I think of it as a very 1s and 0s kind of ordeal. At its simplest roots, everything is that simple, in my eyes. And, by simple, I mean complex to an ungodly level (ba dum pun).
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#9
I believe it is cotton candy.
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A SIGNATURE.
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#10
Does digital physics mean that it is being computed by a digital device, or can it just mean that the universe can be described and calculated as if it were digital?

I think it is digital in nature, but I can't know if it is actually digital or not. I don't know anything about this subject though.
#11
Quote by Wiki
Digital physics is grounded in one or more of the following hypotheses; the hypothesis are listed in order of increasing starkness. The universe, or reality, is:





            Bolded is what I believe. I mean it only makes sense.
            #12
            Quote by slipknot5678
            Does digital physics mean that it is being computed by a digital device, or can it just mean that the universe can be described and calculated as if it were digital?

            I think it is digital in nature, but I can't know if it is actually digital or not. I don't know anything about this subject though.

            This.


            I don't believe, at all, that universe is computed by machines (The Matrix would have imploded existence, then), but I do believe it can be calculated, etc.
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            #13
            well i believe at a small enough level youll get to a unit of the universe ehich can be calcultaed but its so tiny it seems all fuild and shit

            ^this is my replacement for religion
            #15
            Quote by due 07
            Bolded is what I believe. I mean it only makes sense.


            Pretty much this along with what I already said. None of us can know, but it does make sense (I don't mean to repeat what you said, but I originally typed a long thought out post out that made no sense, so I erased it and put this here instead).

            Edit: I'm completely serious, although I worded this wrong. I don't really believe that we are living in a simulated reality, but it would make sense if we do. I think it's a possibility.
            Last edited by slipknot5678 at Oct 2, 2011,
            #16
            I think calculation reaches a horrible, horrible little hell when it meets a black hole. Because no matter what you think it does, nobody is going to get even near to one to find out.
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            #17
            Quote by slipknot5678
            Does digital physics mean that it is being computed by a digital device, or can it just mean that the universe can be described and calculated as if it were digital?
            Some scientists would go further to say that it's being computed on a digital device (Konrad Zuse or Stephen Wolfram). Seems odd at first, as when people think of digital devices and computers, their minds are naturally gonna first associate it with what they know, which is PCs and computers sold in stores. It's not like that at all.

            Others would put it as the second alternative you described. So quantum physicists tend not to be very fond of the idea. Although my brother, who is a mathematician, explained to me how it can be digital with analog features, but I'll butcher what he said if I quote it here.
            #18
            Quote by Flagon
            I think calculation reaches a horrible, horrible little hell when it meets a black hole. Because no matter what you think it does, nobody is going to get even near to one to find out.

            Sounds like the quitter's way out, to me.

            Quitters never win, son. I didn't raise no quitter. Now you get out there, find that black hole, and make daddy proud!
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            #19
            Totally random. Accept the chaos.
            NOW PART OF THE

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            #20
            You could say it is digital, just with too many variables to accurately have the ability to duplicate do to it's analog tendencies (such as expansion and the theories/reality of space being infinite).

            Do we call it digital because we are just now gaining the capability to do similar things in our understanding of computation or have we just not been able to catch up to its advanced abilities. I just think parts of it can be explained with computations within reason, but to have the entire universe be confined to a single "computer" isn't very realistic; with all of the variables and possibilities it would have to be described as almost like A.I. rather than a computer.

            The computer required to make these calculations would be MASSIVE!
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            #21
            Quote by genghisgandhi
            Can't tell if serious. I'm leaning towards not, though.

            Not srs, but I don't have actually a goddamn fucking clue about this. (See post #28242759.) It'd be a trip if the universe was a computer, though. Nah mean?
            #22
            I love how you're using infinite mathematical concepts to explain the notions of something much more tangible.
            G(g)od was like: "Make you an ark of gopher wood; rooms shall you make in the ark, and shall pitch it within and without with pitch."

            And i was like: "What's gopher wood?"
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            #23
            Nooooo I voted wrong, I meant the third option. I think it's digital with analog characteristics.
            cat
            #24
            Quantum digital. Meaning that instead of being based in binary math like human digital constructs, it is based in (effectively) base-infinity math because of quantum superposition.



            Read this. It is also the same book that led to my self-discovery of why quantum superpositions must exist, at least in electrons.
            Last edited by Dirge Humani at Oct 2, 2011,
            #26
            The universe is shaped exactly like the earth; if you go straight long enough, you'll end up where you were.
            #27
            Quote by due 07
            Not srs, but I don't have actually a goddamn fucking clue about this. (See post #28242759.) It'd be a trip if the universe was a computer, though. Nah mean?

            Nobody does, that's what's so stupid about a lot of philosophy. It starts as a few bros talking, one of them says something interesting, they write a paper on it, and all of a sudden they have hordes of people defending the concept as if they have the ultimate answer.


            In my opinion, the concept is so far fetched, there's nearly no chance it can be true. But hey, I could be wrong.
            #28
            Quote by dullsilver_mike
            The universe is shaped exactly like the earth; if you go straight long enough, you'll end up where you were.

            If the universe is a sphere, what is above the universe?
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            #29
            Quote by Dirge Humani
            Quantum digital. Meaning that instead of being based in binary math like human digital constructs, it is based in (effectively) base-infinity math because of quantum superposition.


            *mindisfulloffuck.jpg*


            I'm honestly not intelligent enough to have any opinion on this, but it's an interesting discussion. Mind explaining that?
            #30
            Quote by penguinguy34
            If the universe is a sphere, what is above the universe?


            Well it helps to think of the universe as being planar. If it is, then there is no top. I think it's one of those 'center of the universes" thing. There is no center or rather, the center is everywhere.
            G(g)od was like: "Make you an ark of gopher wood; rooms shall you make in the ark, and shall pitch it within and without with pitch."

            And i was like: "What's gopher wood?"
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            #31
            Quote by dullsilver_mike
            The universe is shaped exactly like the earth; if you go straight long enough, you'll end up where you were.

            And that's how the world began.
            And that's how the world will end.
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            #32
            The universe is like a gigantic tube amp. None of that shitty digital modelling crap.
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            #33
            Quote by SlayingDragons
            *mindisfulloffuck.jpg*


            I'm honestly not intelligent enough to have any opinion on this, but it's an interesting discussion. Mind explaining that?

            In a binary operation, there can exist two states. 0 and 1, for simplicity. That means every bit of data will have one of two discrete, defined states.

            In a quantum operation, there can exist infinite states. A quantum bit (or qubit) can exist in a state of 0 (up spin, if we are talking electrons, which is easiest), 1 (sideways spin), or any of the infinite possible fractional states in between. Each of these states can hold one qubit of data, and can interact with any other quantum-state in a well-defined way (if we can create a quantum programming language).
            #34
            Quote by Dirge Humani
            In a binary operation, there can exist two states. 0 and 1, for simplicity. That means every bit of data will have one of two discrete, defined states.

            In a quantum operation, there can exist infinite states. A quantum bit (or qubit) can exist in a state of 0 (up spin, if we are talking electrons, which is easiest), 1 (sideways spin), or any of the infinite possible fractional states in between. Each of these states can hold one qubit of data, and can interact with any other quantum-state in a well-defined way (if we can create a quantum programming language).


            Oh, okay. Cool. How exactly would that be different from simply existing in a continuous analog state though?
            #36
            Quote by Dirge Humani
            Because it isn't exactly continuous. Each superposition is discrete, there just happen to be an infinite number of them.
            I think that's pretty much how my brother explained it to me.
            #37
            Quote by Lennon993
            Well it helps to think of the universe as being planar. If it is, then there is no top. I think it's one of those 'center of the universes" thing. There is no center or rather, the center is everywhere.

            I like that; I agree with the thought that there is no "other side if the Universe." We can go in any direction we want and not hit and end or a wall. The fact of eventually returning to your point of origin is something I find it hard to comment on there is just so many things that we don't know.

            Can we only see 13 billion light years out because nothing exists beyond there yet, or are we simply looking at the curvature of the universe and in relation to where we are and can only see to that point (like the edge of our earth). I would like to believe that we live where time and space is a planar sphere where we have the ability of time travel, but if this is true would we not once again arrive at the point were the universe was created, or has it always.

            Man, I hate these conversations I always end up with questions as apposed to answers.
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            #38
            Quote by penguinguy34
            Can we only see 13 billion light years out because nothing exists beyond there yet, or are we simply looking at the curvature of the universe and in relation to where we are and can only see to that point (like the edge of our earth).

            We can only see that far out because the universe is only (age of the universe) years old, and also expanding. Light that is any farther than we can see physically cannot reach us.

            If we happened to be a few hundred thousand light years in another direction, lets say "the right", we'd be able to see that much farther to the right, and that much less to the left.
            #39
            Quote by Dirge Humani
            We can only see that far out because the universe is only (age of the universe) years old, and also expanding. Light that is any farther than we can see physically cannot reach us.

            No, I know; i was just trying to find a possible answer to the thought of space and time being a curve which will end where we began, just speculating. I do know that there is no visible light past that point
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            #40
            Quote by Dirge Humani
            Because it isn't exactly continuous. Each superposition is discrete, there just happen to be an infinite number of them.


            But if there's an infinite number of superpositions, how can they be discrete? That would mean that they could exist in any state, in which case it might as well be analog... Unless I'm understanding this wrong. (Very possibly.)


            I'ma have to check out that book some time, "Programming the universe" sounds interesting.
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