#1
What kind of character does the overdrive have on carvin bass amps e.g the bx500 or bx1500? is it ampeg like or more fuzzy?
Quote by Bass First
Rump, a P-bass delivers a rump in the sound such that, similar to the rump on an African American woman, it is the highlight of the tone.
#2
I think carvin has samples all over their website. I am not a bass player, but having owned and played quite a few carvin products they seem to like a bit of fizz and fuzz. It's not really a bad thing, it just makes them sound different.
#4
But the bx1500 has a tube driven preamp also????? I'm confused
Quote by Bass First
Rump, a P-bass delivers a rump in the sound such that, similar to the rump on an African American woman, it is the highlight of the tone.
#5
That famous Ampeg growl comes mostly from a tube power amp driven to hell and back. Most of the time a tube pre amp only adds a bit of warmth to the tone.
Quote by skater dan0
Damn you and your ninja-like modding
#6
I'm just interested in what the carvin overdrive sounds like. I have pretty much tested every amps overdrive that I played and so far like ampegs and acoustics (the acoustic was just by cranking the gain). carvins seem like they would be more versatile and more fun to have so i can play different styles.
Quote by Bass First
Rump, a P-bass delivers a rump in the sound such that, similar to the rump on an African American woman, it is the highlight of the tone.
#7
The BX and B Series Carvin amps have a single 12AX7 tube in the preamp. It doesn't add much, if anything, to the sound. It is a better arrangement than a lot of pedals that have a single tube in there, but in most cases it isn't much better. The BX and B Series are solid-state amplifiers and you should approach them as such. If you want a truly overdriven tube sound, you need a proper tube preamp section with more than one tube. Finding such a preamp - even a rackmount unit - is going to be difficult. The "One Tube Equals Tube Preamp" mentality has infected most of the manufacturers; even the good ones. That's not to say these are bad preamps. It is just that they are hardly true "Tube Preamps."

I have to disagree with the post that Ampeg's distortion comes from overdriving the power amp section. The SVT has six 6550 tubes in the power amp section. The thing is simply too loud. I've known a lot of people who owned the SVT over the years (including myself briefly) and nobody ever dimed the amp out. We all tried it, but it sounded like crap and made the notes sound like mush - when you could tell them apart. Overdriving the power amp section of a tube amp (unless it is one of those low-wattage lunchboxes that guitarists have become so enamored with recently) requires absolutely deafening volume levels. Want proof? Find a guitarist friend with a Marshall SLP 100-watt amplifier and see how loud you have to crank it before you begin to get any distortion. The police will be at your door before you get that classic Marshall overdrive. I speak from experience. Now remember that the Ampeg is 300 watts. Power amp overdrive isn't an option unless you're playing at the Rose Bowl.

Much has been made of bass overdrive, and most of it is rubbish. Most bass overdrives are poor attempts to replicate the growl of an Ampeg SVT through an 8x10 cabinet, and they fail miserably. I've been through more than a dozen bass overdrives over the years and almost all of them sound like muffled farts through a fuzz box. The SansAmp RPM and RBI (and their pedal versions) sound very good, but they're not trying to be distortion boxes. They're preamps/D.I. boxes. You can try a few pedals and see if any of them come close enough to what you want. Tech 21/SansAmp has a modeling pedal that is supposed to give you a passable SVT distortion.

I mention the pedals because from your posts, I'm not entirely sure what it is you're looking for with the Carvin. It sounds like you don't want a Carvin; you want an Ampeg SVT. I suggest you go for one of those if that's the sound you like.

Carvins don't sound like Ampegs. Ampegs don't sound like Carvins. If what you are saying is "I want an Ampeg SVT but I can't afford it, so how do I get that sound without that amp?", then you're pretty much out of luck. You might get close with a pedal, but you won't get what you're looking for. That's true of just about any good amp. They sound like themselves and if that's the sound you want, then that's the amp you're going to have to get.

Good luck!
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
Last edited by FatalGear41 at Oct 2, 2011,
#8
Well I do like the ampeg sound A LOT....... but i don't want to sound like just everyone else. I do want a slight touch of drive and when i want intense distortion I'll just use a pedal. All in all I'm looking a base tone from an amp. Metal will be the prominent style but i don't want a one trick pony (SVT is one IMO) because i like to play funk punk classic rock and others. Maybe I'm trying to hard and making things more complicated than it should be.
Quote by Bass First
Rump, a P-bass delivers a rump in the sound such that, similar to the rump on an African American woman, it is the highlight of the tone.
#9
Quote by FatalGear41
The BX and B Series Carvin amps have a single 12AX7 tube in the preamp. It doesn't add much, if anything, to the sound. It is a better arrangement than a lot of pedals that have a single tube in there, but in most cases it isn't much better. The BX and B Series are solid-state amplifiers and you should approach them as such. If you want a truly overdriven tube sound, you need a proper tube preamp section with more than one tube. Finding such a preamp - even a rackmount unit - is going to be difficult. The "One Tube Equals Tube Preamp" mentality has infected most of the manufacturers; even the good ones. That's not to say these are bad preamps. It is just that they are hardly true "Tube Preamps."

I have to disagree with the post that Ampeg's distortion comes from overdriving the power amp section. The SVT has six 6550 tubes in the power amp section. The thing is simply too loud. I've known a lot of people who owned the SVT over the years (including myself briefly) and nobody ever dimed the amp out. We all tried it, but it sounded like crap and made the notes sound like mush - when you could tell them apart. Overdriving the power amp section of a tube amp (unless it is one of those low-wattage lunchboxes that guitarists have become so enamored with recently) requires absolutely deafening volume levels. Want proof? Find a guitarist friend with a Marshall SLP 100-watt amplifier and see how loud you have to crank it before you begin to get any distortion. The police will be at your door before you get that classic Marshall overdrive. I speak from experience. Now remember that the Ampeg is 300 watts. Power amp overdrive isn't an option unless you're playing at the Rose Bowl.

Much has been made of bass overdrive, and most of it is rubbish. Most bass overdrives are poor attempts to replicate the growl of an Ampeg SVT through an 8x10 cabinet, and they fail miserably. I've been through more than a dozen bass overdrives over the years and almost all of them sound like muffled farts through a fuzz box. The SansAmp RPM and RBI (and their pedal versions) sound very good, but they're not trying to be distortion boxes. They're preamps/D.I. boxes. You can try a few pedals and see if any of them come close enough to what you want. Tech 21/SansAmp has a modeling pedal that is supposed to give you a passable SVT distortion.

I mention the pedals because from your posts, I'm not entirely sure what it is you're looking for with the Carvin. It sounds like you don't want a Carvin; you want an Ampeg SVT. I suggest you go for one of those if that's the sound you like.

Carvins don't sound like Ampegs. Ampegs don't sound like Carvins. If what you are saying is "I want an Ampeg SVT but I can't afford it, so how do I get that sound without that amp?", then you're pretty much out of luck. You might get close with a pedal, but you won't get what you're looking for. That's true of just about any good amp. They sound like themselves and if that's the sound you want, then that's the amp you're going to have to get.

Good luck!


Wow.

Also, to TS, I quite like Line 6's take on the SVT in the POD X3 Live. Quite a nice growl. Otherwise I also like the Catalinbread SFT, which can pretty much go from vintage wooliness, to ampeg-ish, to full on meltdown. Quite versatile.

I understand the desire for 'unique' tone, but don't go past good tone just because you think it's overused. If you can do something best, you don't necessarily have to be first. And seriously, I'm bassist, and I can name you like two dozen virtuoso bassists, but only a few that really have a tone that I would recognise out of context, and even then that's not always a good thing.

I think you're dead on with your closing line. Bass tone is a bitch, and an even bigger bitch to get right. If versatility is what you need, I would recommend looking at an amp (preferably a stack), with a fairly flat response (I use an Ashdown EVO II), and running a modeler into it. I don't find that you run into the same fidelity issues that you can when trying to emulate guitar tones, and it can make your life a lot easier. I've done the whole pedalboard thing, but I keep coming back to my pod.