#1
I intend to propose the college make a small recording studio cum practice pad for musicians sometime next year. I feel it can-
a) Ease up on sponsorship crunch for organizing events related to music (due to revenue, lower rates for faculty/students)
b) Promote music, and give students the ability to continue with music and studies without clashing with each other (sice it will be right on campus, it will be convenient in the extreme for students)
c) Provide experience in audio engineering to students and faculty alike
d) Boost college's rep since I dont think any other college in the whole country has a recording studio

Any other reasons I can add?

EDIT: Before people start telling me about their colleges, I live in India where most colleges dont even have music rooms
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Oct 2, 2011,
#2
get a petition and have as many students as possible sign it.

Reason E) It will help keep the students out of trouble by giving them a positive and creative pace to go.
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#4
Definitely do a petition with something about how it is academically a good thing for music majors to learn how to use a recording studio. Get enough faculty and students to sign it (depends on the size of your school of course) and you may see one at some point.

And just FYI, my college has a recording studio :P
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#5
Money talks. Get some figures together to show how profitable the studio can be (i.e. costs to start it up versus price of the service needed to offset costs and generate additional revenue) especially if one of your main reasons is alleviation from a sponsorship crunch
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#6
Quote by Robbgnarly
get a petition and have as many students as possible sign it.

Reason E) It will help keep the students out of trouble by giving them a positive and creative pace to go.


Thats a good one.

Quote by Fantum1337
Definitely do a petition with something about how it is academically a good thing for music majors to learn how to use a recording studio. Get enough faculty and students to sign it (depends on the size of your school of course) and you may see one at some point.

And just FYI, my college has a recording studio :P


We dont ahve a music course, but we do haev Mass Comm and Multimedia courses, they stand to gain a lot from it.

And I live in India, most colleges here dont even have a music room

Btw which college? Examples of colleges that have studios will come in handy

Quote by prsrulz91
Money talks. Get some figures together to show how profitable the studio can be (i.e. costs to start it up versus price of the service needed to offset costs and generate additional revenue) especially if one of your main reasons is alleviation from a sponsorship crunch


On a rough calculation, im gussing about 3-4 thousand dollars for a drumkit, mics, MFX units, monitors, mixer, interface, soundproofing etc. Basically everything except the guitars.

As to prices, im thinking of doing a college wide survey on whether students would be willing to use it, and for showing support.
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Oct 2, 2011,
#7
A decent sized studio/jam room would cost the college well in excess of $100,000 with the price of construction (specialized materials and methods for acoustic treatment/isolation), interior room treatment, equipment purchase and installation, as well as maintanence and upkeeping costs. Convincing them that it will pay for itself is going to be tough.

EDIT: I'm not even joking or exaggerating. A quality job is NOT cheap. Jump on some audio engineering forums and read some threads about DIY studio builds. If you've got a pre-existing building to convert into a studio, you could work with <$15,000. If you need to build a space, read above.
Last edited by Kikuta at Oct 2, 2011,
#8
Low budget land. Start out small and let it build itself.
Sponsors. Try working out deals with local music stores (equipment) and radio stations ( recording client commercials ) to get the cost of building and running it down. Get this in line before your proposal.

Find some Amoral SOB who could sell CDs to a deaf guy to make the proposal for you.
#9
Quote by Kikuta
A decent sized studio/jam room would cost the college well in excess of $100,000 with the price of construction (specialized materials and methods for acoustic treatment/isolation), interior room treatment, equipment purchase and installation, as well as maintanence and upkeeping costs. Convincing them that it will pay for itself is going to be tough.

EDIT: I'm not even joking or exaggerating. A quality job is NOT cheap. Jump on some audio engineering forums and read some threads about DIY studio builds. If you've got a pre-existing building to convert into a studio, you could work with <$15,000. If you need to build a space, read above.


Im not talking about a 100% pro studio, im talking about something a bit more basic than that. Even a basic studio here will be a cut above most studios/pads in Calcutta, the situation here is so bad.

EDIT: Saw your edit, yeah, we have lots of pre existing buildings to keep it in. Im thinking of grabbing some unused rooms from the BMM dept, there already sealed and air conditioned, il only have to get it properly soundproofed. Shouldnt be too hard, ive seen people work wonders with just blankets and mattresses, if i get the go ahead il be using a lot of foam and stuff. The biggest chunk of the budget is going to go on equipment. Computers can be sourced from the computer science dept, theyve got too many overpowered machines anyway.

15 grand is probably too much, but with a bit of luck raising 5-10 grand is just about possible. 1 grand will probably come from the dept itself, and sponsorships can hopefully get another 2-5. Bare minimum 2-3 grand, hopefull a bit more than 5. Assuming I get the go ahead in the first place.


Basically, equipment wise, I have this in mind-

Drumkit
Mics in case bands bring their own amps, 3x SM57, one vocal mic with pop filter, still undecided
Drum mic set
Two modelling processors, thinking one 11 Rack and a POD HD Pro
Monitors. 2 or 3 sets, one for the control room, one for the fellows playing in case they are using their MFX units/the units supplied
Mixer
Headphones
Stands

Keeping amps isnt a biggie, about 95% of people here use MFX units, and the other 5% use Spiders and MG's.

What else am I missing, purely on equipment?
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Oct 2, 2011,
#10
My college has a recording studio..

My band has recorded there multiple times thanks to my friend that's going to school for audio engineering.

It's legit too, everyone I talk to about it is jealous I got to record there
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#11
Quote by BeastModeEngage
My college has a recording studio..

My band has recorded there multiple times thanks to my friend that's going to school for audio engineering.

It's legit too, everyone I talk to about it is jealous I got to record there


You dont live in India

Anyway, am I missing something in equipment?
#12
Quote by GS LEAD 5
You dont live in India

Anyway, am I missing something in equipment?


Sounds like you've got everything listed that you'd need. I'm not a pro audio engineer or anything. But from my time spent in the studio, it sounds liek you've got everything listed that'd be necessary.
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#13
Studios are expensive, even if you try the budget route and cheap out on the desk, computer, after all the little things like mics, speakers, cables, stands it costs a fortune.

Its alot to ask from a college that doesnt even provide a music tech course... How are you even going to know how to use it?

Move to england, heres our (unfinished) studio after the desk got put in.


#14
I wouldn't just go for recording studio. I would maybe just push for a music department in general, if there isn't one already.
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#15
Quote by BeastModeEngage
Sounds like you've got everything listed that you'd need. I'm not a pro audio engineer or anything. But from my time spent in the studio, it sounds liek you've got everything listed that'd be necessary.


Just making sure I didnt miss anything, since im not exactly a pro at this

Quote by beckyjc
Studios are expensive, even if you try the budget route and cheap out on the desk, computer, after all the little things like mics, speakers, cables, stands it costs a fortune.

Its alot to ask from a college that doesnt even provide a music tech course... How are you even going to know how to use it?

Move to england, heres our (unfinished) studio after the desk got put in.





Well, they let out the auditorium for a fee......
The little things I can get for free
I forgot to mention, im on the finance committee for our colleges Fine Arts dept, the dept deals with everything to do with western music etc.

EDIT: One question, i know this sounds stupid, but when you use an analogue mixer you are effectively doing all the post eq before it actually gets recorded right? And the sound going into the DAW is just one (or two if stereo) track with everything mixed right? I know it sounds stupid, but all the recording I have done was either MFX>PC or Mic>Preamp>PC. Ive used a mixer only for setting levels and EQ at events in college, so am a little inexperienced as far as its work in recording is concerned. I always use the mixer in Reaper so

And what soundproofing did you do? That pic looks like just wood outside the control room.



This is actually for a garage, but classrooms here are like MASSIVE, you can prolly fite 5 or 6 cars in each, will a scheme like this be ok for a basic studio cum jam room?
The central part will be for jamming, and for recording guitars if its going to be MFX>Mixer. The small room at the right will be for miced guitars and vocals, and the bigger room for micing drums.

Quote by Natrone
I wouldn't just go for recording studio. I would maybe just push for a music department in general, if there isn't one already.



We have two, one for eastern and one for western. There is a diploma for performing arts, does that count? Thats done by the eastern dept (XADAM- Xaviers Academy of Dance abd Music). Fine Arts does western. All vents are organized by these two depts, and all inter college stuff is also done by these two.


EDIT: Are Behringers studio stuff as bad as their amps and pedals?

And one question. How do you double track using an analogue mixer into an interface?
With Reaper, I usually record it once, then on a second track record it pver again.

Is it possible to have a mixer that has a unique output line for each channel, with each going into an input of a multi channel interface?
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Oct 2, 2011,
#16
I wouldnt reccomend an analogue mixer if youre going to be using a computer, theres no point without an ADAT interface (with a digital desk) or making more complicated routing than it needs to be.

You can get a 8 channel firewire interface for not too much, (Focusrite Octopre, PreSonus FireStudio, M-audio profire, Mackie Onyx 1620). This includes the mic preamps, line ins/dis, monitor outs, and direct zero latency ad/da conversion.

Then you can use your software to record all the seperate tracks, and plugins to EQ and mix it visually with out having to record everything to a digital multitracker to put into the computer or mix it all down to 2 mono channels to be mastered.

Behringers equipment is shite all around really.

Double track as per usual, record, make a new track, record again and pan the tracks.

Edit: Dont forget good monitors are important, so is getting a good computer, vsts are hard on a computers CPU, you want at least a 3ghz dual core, probably a quad core just to be sure.
Last edited by beckyjc at Oct 2, 2011,
#17
Quote by beckyjc
I wouldnt reccomend an analogue mixer if youre going to be using a computer, theres no point without an ADAT interface (with a digital desk) or making more complicated routing than it needs to be.

You can get a 8 channel firewire interface for not too much, (Focusrite Octopre, PreSonus FireStudio, M-audio profire, Mackie Onyx 1620). This includes the mic preamps, line ins/dis, monitor outs, and direct zero latency ad/da conversion.

Then you can use your software to record all the seperate tracks, and plugins to EQ and mix it visually with out having to record everything to a digital multitracker to put into the computer or mix it all down to 2 mono channels to be mastered.

Behringers equipment is shite all around really.

Double track as per usual, record, make a new track, record again and pan the tracks.

Edit: Dont forget good monitors are important, so is getting a good computer, vsts are hard on a computers CPU, you want at least a 3ghz dual core, probably a quad core just to be sure.


So il bunk a mixer, go direct to a multi channel interface?
As for VST's, prolly be using an i5 or something, not too bothered about speed since my much slower Athlon II X4 manages VST's just fine.
So basically il go
Instrument>mic>interface>PC?
Or Insterument>modeller>interface>PC?

As for monitors, im thinking of AKG or Sennheiser phones for the guys who will play miced, and an FRFR multi channel PA style amp, like the Peavey KB5 for those who'll go modelling. Thing is, will typical monitors manage bass slap and pop? Slapping and popping on my KB4 causes the compressor to cut signal altogether.
If thats a bad idea, how about some M Audio monitors?
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Oct 2, 2011,
#18
The mackie onyx i was talking about is a mixer with a built in fw interface. Pretty sleek, the preamps are good too.


But you dont need it, since for the most part youll be doing the levels and mixing from your computer, it always looks prettier though.

An i5 should be more than enough, make sure it has firewire ports though .

Yeah, there should be hi-z or instrument inputs/a switch on the interface, thats what you'd use for running say into a pod then into the interface, or running a guitar straight in and using amplitube or something for amp/cab emulation and guitar effects. Bass is more often than not recorded in this way.
#19
Quote by beckyjc
The mackie onyx i was talking about is a mixer with a built in fw interface. Pretty sleek, the preamps are good too.


But you dont need it, since for the most part youll be doing the levels and mixing from your computer, it always looks prettier though.

An i5 should be more than enough, make sure it has firewire ports though .

Yeah, there should be hi-z or instrument inputs/a switch on the interface, thats what you'd use for running say into a pod then into the interface, or running a guitar straight in and using amplitube or something for amp/cab emulation and guitar effects. Bass is more often than not recorded in this way.


Basically the mixer you mentioned ha a separete out for each channel?
And id prefer to do as much mixing as possible before recording starts. Id rather get it right first time than start working on it after recording.

Could you link me? I spoke to our head, and my class CR, il need to draw up a rough plan with price estimates and revenue estimates by november. Its holidays till 1st, might as well use the time.

http://www.bajaao.com/shop/74-studiorecording/81-mixers/218-digital-mixers/6523-edirol-m-16dx-16-channel-digital-mixer--audio-interface

Can this thing record multiple tracks to a DAW? The Onyx is unavailable here

http://www.bajaao.com/shop/74-studiorecording/4558-m-audio-nrv10-analog-mixer--10x10-firewire-audio-interface

What about this?

And another thing, can something like this be done-


Instrument> Mixer > Monitors in control room, as well as monitors in playing area?
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Oct 2, 2011,
#20
Quote by GS LEAD 5
I intend to propose the college make a small recording studio cum practice pad for musicians sometime next year. I feel it can-
a) Ease up on sponsorship crunch for organizing events related to music (due to revenue, lower rates for faculty/students)
b) Promote music, and give students the ability to continue with music and studies without clashing with each other (sice it will be right on campus, it will be convenient in the extreme for students)
c) Provide experience in audio engineering to students and faculty alike
d) Boost college's rep since I dont think any other college in the whole country has a recording studio

Any other reasons I can add?

EDIT: Before people start telling me about their colleges, I live in India where most colleges dont even have music rooms



Looks like a good set of talking points for your proposal. Before you present it, make sure you

1) research costs more and give a comprehensive report on how much they'll have to pay any engineering instructor, etc, whatever blanket licensing they may have to pay and so forth.

2) Come up with and explain a clear, quantitative way you're going to measure the benefits this will bring. Part of your pilot year should include very tight evaluation of the studio's impact.

It is a great facility for any school to have and it lends itself naturally to other things like a college radio station, and can be useful for many non-music degrees like broadcasting, advertising, etc.
Last edited by dullsilver_mike at Oct 2, 2011,
#21
Quote by dullsilver_mike
Looks like a good set of talking points for your proposal. Before you present it, make sure you

1) research costs more and give a comprehensive report on how much they'll have to pay any engineering instructor, etc, whatever blanket licensing they may have to pay and so forth.

2) Come up with and explain a clear, quantitative way you're going to measure the benefits this will bring. Part of your pilot year should include very tight evaluation of the studio's impact.

It is a great facility for any school to have and it lends itself naturally to other things like a college radio station, and can be useful for many non-music degrees like broadcasting, advertising, etc.

Thanks man am right now in the cost analysis stage in fact
Any opinions on the mixers above?

And are peavey mixers any good?
#22
Ah, ok, I gotcha. I was getting the impression that there simply wasn't a music department in general, and that you were wanting to convince a school with no music program to build a recording studio.
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#23
If the college doesn't have enough money to build a recording studio, you should get some of your friends that go to the school to have a fundraiser to raise some money.
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#24
Quote by kutless999
If the college doesn't have enough money to build a recording studio, you should get some of your friends that go to the school to have a fundraiser to raise some money.

Funds not a problem, its getting the go ahead. Opinions on the mixers in my previous post?

Quote by Natrone
Ah, ok, I gotcha. I was getting the impression that there simply wasn't a music department in general, and that you were wanting to convince a school with no music program to build a recording studio.

Im just trying to make the music group get bigger
#25
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Funds not a problem, its getting the go ahead. Opinions on the mixers in my previous post?


Im just trying to make the music group get bigger

In what price range?
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#26
Quote by GS LEAD 5
On a rough calculation, im gussing about 3-4 thousand dollars for a drumkit, mics, MFX units, monitors, mixer, interface, soundproofing etc. Basically everything except the guitars.

You must be thinking about building a very small studio, out of an existing building, with little to no modifications, then.

My home studio cost more than that, and I'm no where near finished.


P.S. Don't buy modelers. Since you're thinking of doing this on an extremely low budget, just get the best interface you can and use software modelers if you need to. There are plenty of awesome, free, VST amp sims out there, and for the same price as either of the modelers you're considering, you can get POD Farm, ReValver and TH2, etc. for less than one of them.
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Last edited by MatrixClaw at Oct 2, 2011,
#27
Quote by kutless999
In what price range?


Mixer, about a grand.

Quote by MatrixClaw
You must be thinking about building a very small studio, out of an existing building, with little to no modifications, then.

My home studio cost more than that, and I'm no where near finished.


P.S. Don't buy modelers. Since you're thinking of doing this on an extremely low budget, just get the best interface you can and use software modelers if you need to. There are plenty of awesome, free, VST amp sims out there, and for the same price as either of the modelers you're considering, you can get POD Farm, ReValver and TH2, etc. for less than one of them.



I didnt include prices for the soundproofing, i still need to contact store and builders.
Imj expecting a budget (if i get te go ahead) at a minimum of about 3 grand. I intend to try pushing for about 5-6.
Advantages of VST's over something like an 11R? and if I go the VST, what do I spend the 1.5G or so on?
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Oct 2, 2011,
#29
Quote by kutless999

The PV20 is pretty much the cheapest mixer with USB that I can find. If it does decently, then its def gonna go into my plan.

Else, the Edirol I linked earlier looks good, it supports multi track recording to a DAW, which is exactly what I have in mind.


Anyone else have any ideas?
#30
When I was at Uni I started a musician's club. I just stuck posters everywhere announcing a meeting and waited. A plethora of people turned up and we ended up being the biggest club on campus in a very short time.
Armed with this demonstration of interest I approached the Uni and the Student Union asking for funding. Because it was obviously filling a need on campus they handed over enough money to buy a PA.
It would have been harder to get recording gear because part of my pitch was that we could put on shows for the student body. You need to show how the money will benefit the general student body, not just your little group.
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#31
A headphone amp or power amps? If you're going the budget route just get a nice audio interface and mix in the DAW. It's a huge waste of money on a budget under 4k to drop 1k on a mixer when you're not even running live sound.
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#32
Quote by Cathbard
When I was at Uni I started a musician's club. I just stuck posters everywhere announcing a meeting and waited. A plethora of people turned up and we ended up being the biggest club on campus in a very short time.
Armed with this demonstration of interest I approached the Uni and the Student Union asking for funding. Because it was obviously filling a need on campus they handed over enough money to buy a PA.
It would have been harder to get recording gear because part of my pitch was that we could put on shows for the student body. You need to show how the money will benefit the general student body, not just your little group.


It IS for the general student body, its just that our group has to be the one to get the work started. THe studio will be used for recording and or practicing, with reduced rates for students, faculty and alumni. Support wont be a problem- just about every fourth person has a band. Jam pads are few and far in between.
Also, I intend to carry out a survey once colelge re opens as to how much support I van get from the students regarding the plan.

Quote by mespinos
A headphone amp or power amps? If you're going the budget route just get a nice audio interface and mix in the DAW. It's a huge waste of money on a budget under 4k to drop 1k on a mixer when you're not even running live sound.


Its also a jam pad, so il be needing a mixer for practicing right? I mean, by default, the two modellers, the bass amps DI out will be connected to the mixer, and the mixer to the monitors and computer (i intend to get a mixer with a multi track interface attached like the aforementioned Edirol).

Or can I do this?
Use the modellers quarter inch out to connect to an FRFR amp like a keyboard amp? The bass amps speaker doesnt get muted when you use the DI out, so the bass wont be a problem. And keyboard amps have a vocals input.


EDIT: Either way, il be spending a grand x.x a keyboard amp loud enough for playing with a drummer will be at least 400 dollars, and an 8 track interface at least another 500 or so.....

EDIT: And Cath, sticking posters everywhere wont work. You need the VP's authorization to put up any notice. In other words, il have to get the project authorized before im allowed to put u[p posters


Also, what about maintenance costs?
All our equipment will be solid state if I get the go ahead for a full studio. If I end up just being allowed to make a music room, then il dump the modellers in favor of a pair of tube amps, say, a 6505 and a GH50L, or maybe an Egnator Rebel/Renegade and a pair of POD's or some other thing with 4CM for effects.
All work like cleaning up etc will be done by students, in return for credits like all other activities (the rule is 30 hours per credit). So that leaves tube changes (in case i only get the go ahead for a music room and I get the tube amps) and electricity bills. Electricity im guessing will be about 60-100 dollars a month, maybe a wee bit more. For practices, charges will be about 3-4 dollars an hour, 5 for outside people. Its higher than most other pads (1.5-2 an hour) but i'd say its justified since most other pads give you nothing more than a drumkit, a 100 dollar mixer, and another 100 dollar pair of locally made speakers. The equipment I listed so far might not be upto international stanadrds, but here its like manna
Assuming 15 hours a day (from 6 morning till 9 night, since the college has tree main depts, B Com and BBA Morning, BSc and BA day, and BCom and BBA Evening). This way students from the day depts can practice either before or after class, withvolunteers from the same depts helping out with setting up etc and the BCom guys can do their bit before or after classes again.
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Oct 3, 2011,
#33
Spoke to the seniors, im going to push for just a practice room first. The recording studio will come later if the practice room idea works out.
Basically this is my idea-
Grab one of the sealed air conditioned rooms manned by the Mass Comm dept, carpet it, use ltos of acoustic foam, more or less soundproof it.
Add a drumkit, an unpowered analogue mixer, an FRFR SS poweramp, PA speakers and mics, and a bass amp (unprocessed bass through a PA sounds shit and slap/pop usually makes them clip like crazy, and very few people here own bass modellers, looking at Ampeg BA112, the one model I tried sounded pretty sweet).
A couple of modellers/MFX units will be added later, once the main recording studio work starts.

Is it possible to wire Peavey's PR series speakers in series? Say a PR 110 and a 112 in series on each of the two channels on the poweramp? Or can you just use one speaker per channel?
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Oct 3, 2011,
#34
You don't want it to be soundproofed completely or else the room will sound "dead." It should have a good acoustic balance with just enough soundproofing that it doesn't annoy others in the building when someone is practicing.
Quote by necrosis1193
As usual Natrone's mouth spouts general win.

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plexi


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Rest In Peace Stevie Ray
#35
Quote by Natrone
You don't want it to be soundproofed completely or else the room will sound "dead." It should have a good acoustic balance with just enough soundproofing that it doesn't annoy others in the building when someone is practicing.

This is new. Ok, so how do I go about doing that?
And opinion on equipment?
EDIT: A quick google appears to suggest having a room who's length to breadth is in the golden ratio, with a soundproof roof.
Any merits to this?
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Oct 4, 2011,
#36
Quote by GS LEAD 5
This is new. Ok, so how do I go about doing that?
And opinion on equipment?
EDIT: A quick google appears to suggest having a room who's length to breadth is in the golden ratio, with a soundproof roof.
Any merits to this?


When looking into acoustically treating a room properly, there are a distressingly large number of things - both simple and complex - to consider. Room modes and room reverberance are the two biggest factors, each controlled through a variety of methods.

If you're serious about what you're doing, and don't want to pay someone hundreds, maybe even thousands of dollars for consultancy in acoustic treatment, I cannot recommend anything beyond buying a copy of The Master Handbook of Acoustics by Everrest and Pohlmann. It's long, it's complicated, but it is the best investment you can make if you want to get this done properly.

You might be able to find assistance for minimal fee - maybe even for free - from someone within your college that knows about this sort of thing. Ask around if anybody knows anyone that deals with this sort of thing. Find someone you know who already runs a studio that understands all this - hell, find someone that would be willing to work with you as a 'sponsor'. I'm sure if there is any sort of audio engineering college around, you'd be able to find someone there that would be willing to give a helping hand (on a slight tangeant, you might be able to find some audio engineering students willing to come and work in your upcoming studio).
#37
Quote by Kikuta
When looking into acoustically treating a room properly, there are a distressingly large number of things - both simple and complex - to consider. Room modes and room reverberance are the two biggest factors, each controlled through a variety of methods.

If you're serious about what you're doing, and don't want to pay someone hundreds, maybe even thousands of dollars for consultancy in acoustic treatment, I cannot recommend anything beyond buying a copy of The Master Handbook of Acoustics by Everrest and Pohlmann. It's long, it's complicated, but it is the best investment you can make if you want to get this done properly.

You might be able to find assistance for minimal fee - maybe even for free - from someone within your college that knows about this sort of thing. Ask around if anybody knows anyone that deals with this sort of thing. Find someone you know who already runs a studio that understands all this - hell, find someone that would be willing to work with you as a 'sponsor'. I'm sure if there is any sort of audio engineering college around, you'd be able to find someone there that would be willing to give a helping hand (on a slight tangeant, you might be able to find some audio engineering students willing to come and work in your upcoming studio).



Thanks man thats great advice there. Will definitely try getting hold of the book.
And yeah, the sponsor thing is a good idea too.

EDIT: The library has it as an online viewable PDF, w00t!
Gonna give it a read tonight.
Thanks man
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Oct 4, 2011,
#38
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Basically the mixer you mentioned ha a separete out for each channel?
And id prefer to do as much mixing as possible before recording starts. Id rather get it right first time than start working on it after recording.

Could you link me? I spoke to our head, and my class CR, il need to draw up a rough plan with price estimates and revenue estimates by november. Its holidays till 1st, might as well use the time.

http://www.bajaao.com/shop/74-studiorecording/81-mixers/218-digital-mixers/6523-edirol-m-16dx-16-channel-digital-mixer--audio-interface

Can this thing record multiple tracks to a DAW? The Onyx is unavailable here

http://www.bajaao.com/shop/74-studiorecording/4558-m-audio-nrv10-analog-mixer--10x10-firewire-audio-interface

What about this?

And another thing, can something like this be done-


Instrument> Mixer > Monitors in control room, as well as monitors in playing area?


Yeah that mixer in particular has line outs for each track. It also has 4 aux buses you can use to send various tracks through to different headphones.

There are 16 ins (so you can record 16 tracks at once) and edit pre recording, but it has 2 outs so you will only be able to mix 2 tracks post recording using the actual desk.

That edirol thing im unsure of. Mostly because its USB, im sketchy of anything USB that says it can record more than 2 tracks @ 24bit 96khz.. Id reccomend sticking with firewire, but do some research because i dont actually know the edirol.

The m-audio should do everything you need. I find the m-audio stuff a little plasticky, but the sound is fine. I notice that desk is missing a DI/instrument option, you'll have to buy a DI box for plugging in instruments directly.

Theres a multitude of ways to direct sound out of a mixer, you can do it through the DAW, usually desks will have a couple sets of outputs for the main mix and control room.
#39
I don't think you can make a petition to force a school to spend money, can you?

Our high school got a $6,000 grant. Started the studio last year. Going to go in thursday and record for free.
#40
Quote by beckyjc
Yeah that mixer in particular has line outs for each track. It also has 4 aux buses you can use to send various tracks through to different headphones.

There are 16 ins (so you can record 16 tracks at once) and edit pre recording, but it has 2 outs so you will only be able to mix 2 tracks post recording using the actual desk.

That edirol thing im unsure of. Mostly because its USB, im sketchy of anything USB that says it can record more than 2 tracks @ 24bit 96khz.. Id reccomend sticking with firewire, but do some research because i dont actually know the edirol.

The m-audio should do everything you need. I find the m-audio stuff a little plasticky, but the sound is fine. I notice that desk is missing a DI/instrument option, you'll have to buy a DI box for plugging in instruments directly.

Theres a multitude of ways to direct sound out of a mixer, you can do it through the DAW, usually desks will have a couple sets of outputs for the main mix and control room.


Ok, so basically youre saying the M Audio can record multiple tracks to a DAW?
And it usually can send two signals, one via USB / Firewire to the DAW and another to monitors in the practice room?

Quote by Dmaj7
I don't think you can make a petition to force a school to spend money, can you?

Our high school got a $6,000 grant. Started the studio last year. Going to go in thursday and record for free.


Not to spend money, to get authoprization cash is not a big problem, but getting the go ahead is