#1
Hey UG!

I'm 16 right now and I guess I should be deciding where I want to study. I already know I want to study audio engineering and be really successful (who doesn't want to be successful?)

Anyway, I was wondering what the best place to study Audio Engineering in London would be.

I know there's SAE and Alchemea but those are the 2 schools I know of.

Also, after I graduate, will it be easy to get a job in Audio Engineering? How do you get to be huge?

Thanks
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#2
First things first. If you study audio engineering, you won't be really successful. Sorry but it's a crazy competitive field and the odds are not in your favor if you're asking these questions.

How do you get to be huge? If you're one out of millions that gets a lucky break, takes the opportunity, and doesn't screw it up. Also if you make all the right connections. It really has nothing to do with where/what you study.

SAE is a good schoool, but even they'll admit that there's nothing they teach that you can't find on google. The only difference is you get a little bit of hands on experience with gear that you'd never be able to afford on your own. You also get handed all the info without you having to work for it, which is both a good and bad thing. If you're not willing to put in 10X the work that any school requires, you won't get past home recording. It's all in what you do on your own and how bad you want it really...

Expect a good chunk of time with little to no pay if you find any work after school.

It's lots of fun though, I recommend it.
#3
Quote by SupahStrat
Hey UG!

I'm 16 right now and I guess I should be deciding where I want to study. I already know I want to study audio engineering and be really successful (who doesn't want to be successful?)

Anyway, I was wondering what the best place to study Audio Engineering in London would be.

I know there's SAE and Alchemea but those are the 2 schools I know of.

Also, after I graduate, will it be easy to get a job in Audio Engineering? How do you get to be huge?

Thanks


I know a guy that went to SAE in Glasgow who is now paying me to record his band because he knows I can do a better job than he can, that's not to demean the guy personally; he's smart just SAE didn't teach him what was required to put out a recording at even the level that even I can achieve.

I myself went to a local college but the experience was the same, I learnt nearly all I know from the internet where there is basically an army of seasoned professionals pouring out information in comparison to the failed mixers at my college who I couldn't even find one production or engineering credit for anywhere.

If your experience is anything like mine then they won't teach you how best to mic a cab, they won't teach you how industry professionals prep their mixes - drum editing, vocal tuning, compression staging or mix automation.

They might let you play with some nice microphones and mixing desks but thats what they'll probably stop at, at best it's a good place for making connections, at worst its a waste of your cash.

To get the best at something you have to work your butt off and apply and scour information from anywhere as well as doing serious amounts of prep work - if the ingredients are shit so is the final product but most people at these places don't seem to realise that and you'll end up doing something rediculous like recording a Marshall MG with a Neumann or something because they don't have any better amps. If you think your going to get a job just walking out of a degree then your sadly wrong, these things are hyper competitive and only for the select few that are dedicated enough to carve a niche.
Owen - Sound Engineer - Mixing & Editing Available, PM for details.
#4
About music production and engineering....

My answer from another thread on the same question....

First, there are studios closing down daily because the market is just not there anymore to support many of them. Your potential number of employers is dwindling all the time, and those people who had jobs at those studios (and therefore experience) will be competing with you looking for work at the handful that are still standing.

Second, most real-world studios don't care that much if you have qualifications on paper. They look at what your track record is. What have you done? Can I hear your work? That sort of thing. Someone whose work speaks for itself without training will get the job pretty much every time over someone whose work is okay who has training.

By extension of both of those, most studios don't put out ads "wanted: studio engineer." They take advantage of their existing set of contacts and connections and fish from that pond. It is very much a business of who you know.

So.... given all that, the best way of getting a job at a major studio is:
1. Show up at their door and introduce yourself. Do this many times if necessary. Be a polite, cordial, eager and pleasant pain in the ass. You're not there for a job yet. You're volunteering to make coffee, vacuum carpets, be a gopher when someone in a band needs smokes, water plants, whatever. In return, all you ask is for the chance to watch a few sessions so you can start learning some stuff.
2. Once your foot is in the door, be the best coffee maker, carpet vacuumer, corner-store runner you can. It shows you're worth the effort for them to have you around. They'll start to like you and be more willing to let you watch. They'll even teach you the proper way to wind cables.
3. Eventually, you'll be given jobs like setting up mics and moving them around the room as the engineer tells you what to do - "closer... closer.... back it off a bit... now left... "

Little jobs at a time, and you'll be trained on site by the people who know what they are doing. It won't cost you anything but time.

As they get confidence in your knowledge, reliability, etc., there will come a time when the studio makes some concession to band where they'll give them a cut rate if they're willing to come in at 6:00am and work with one of their interns. That would be you. Maybe it will come up as one of the regular studio assistants is sick, or quits, or whatever, and you'll get called up to help out. Sure, you're last picked, but at least you're picked.

You'll start noticing that other people with genuine credentials are sending in their resumees. The studio, already with a full complement of staff, including interns, assistants, lackeys, etc. does not typically call those applicants back.

CT

PS. Just in case you're thinking that I'm one of those "anti-education.... school is no good for anything" kind of people, I have a degree in music and teach in a school... so no. I'm *very* pro-education. I'm also very practical, and that means taking the steps you *really* need to get there rather than assuming that a piece of paper will be your ticket.
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#5
just wanna let you know Audio Engineering opens the door to many jobs, not just recording music or shows. You could work in post-Production for tv or movies, go visit the studios in your city.

You could also work at a radio station or as audio-visual tech in a company or school, you could even work for video game studios.

If you wanna make it big, you're gonna have to be agresive and meet a lot of people, talk and learn about it all the time and seize opportunity.