#1
So I've been writing my own music for a while, just guitar and vocals and whatnot. I've gotten fairly good at writing lyrics, and can almost always come up with a nice guitar part to go along with it, but singing is kind of a hassle for me. I don't have a very high range, but I figure if I practice enough I can extend that a bit. But another issue is just the timbre of my voice. When I listen to recordings of myself, it just doesn't sound that great, even if I hit the note just fine. So is there any secret to finding the right way to sing, or am I just stuck with a crappy sounding voice?
"Love everything. Know nothing."

"What do you mean 'do you even know how to play bongo drums?'?! Do I not have hands?! And pot?!"
#2
Anything can be improved. Get the basics of singing down. Breathe right, use your diaphragm right etc. But don't be shy about kicking your vocals up a notch. Find a song thats challenging but you know the melody to and soar away. My range in decent, and thats how I got there, never took lessons.

Also, great singers like Chris Cornell and Axl Rose have whats considered a bad timbre, but they've worked around it and that gives them a unique and instantly recognizable sound. Don't lose hope XD
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#3
Don't take this the wrong way, but tone cannot be helped. We are born with the voice we have, it is learning to control it that makes someone a "good" singer. EVERYBODY can sing. Unless you are tone deaf (you are obviously not, hence playing guitar much?) and breathing is huge. The trick is to breathe from your gut and not your shoulders. You will look stupid but sound better. Try to sing/breathe without moving your shoulders, feeling your stomach move out and in. This type of breathing is move effective. Also, if you are looking for more sound, try opening your mouth wider. Some people are uncomfortable having their jaw open that wide (sex pun right?) but try it and you'll come to see that sound expels louder this way. It's like comparing mumbling to actually speaking in a sense.

The thing people seem to worry about the most is their vibrato. For some reason they think that nervously shaking their voice counts...? Vibrato is all about control, it is like hammering-on and pulling-off on a guitar but with your voice. Using vibrato at the right speed is where it gets tricky, seeing as how you have to time it in the nano second. Some people are born with brilliant tone/quality to their voice and naturally pick up on controlling vibrato. Then learning things like breathing and vocal exercises give them the professional edge.

Personally, I'd say if you cannot yet control your vibrato then leave it out. That is one less thing you need to worry about making sound good. Just focus on the correct note and breathing. The note obviously so that you are in key, etc. And the breathing so you can hold said note and keep it at an appropriate volume.

Last resort is to find a singer. There are plenty of people born with that natural ability, some too shy to admit it. Even if they are not people persons they can still enjoy the intimacy of making music!
#4
So then how do I learn how to control my voice? Or at least get the basics down? I've heard good things about the Bel Canto technique, but I'm pretty sure it isn't free, so I don't know if that'll be an option.
"Love everything. Know nothing."

"What do you mean 'do you even know how to play bongo drums?'?! Do I not have hands?! And pot?!"