#1
I'm currently mixing a song for some practice and I'm trying to get a feel similar to that of Mumford and Sons, particularly the track Thistle and Weeds. Its like a close, small bar, quiet feel that just gives you the chills. I'm thinking it has to do with the reverb, any help on how to attain it?
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#4
Small room size, a short pre-delay, and play with the wet volume level as needed.

That should get ya started.

EDIT:I have never heard the track you described though and need to catch a bus....but I assume thats what your describing.
Last edited by FireHawk at Oct 3, 2011,
#5
Don't know the song, and can't stand Mumford & Sons, but I think the easiest solution is one I used to use (and sometimes still do when stuck for inspiration), which is to get a good convolution reverb plug-in with well-recommended presets, and then go through them one by one (with soloed-vocals and then full mix and back) listening to how the different types of reverb change the sound, and once you begin to narrow down a shortlist of presets you like, start thinking about what you now want to alter about that preset to work even better.

It might be increasing the sustain/decay time; it might be increasing the pre-delay to give the impression of a larger space/being further back in the mix; it might even just be a case of putting some EQ after the reverb so nothing below 500Hz shimmers through, making the reverberation clearer and preventing extra muddy detail in the mix - something I often do, and it can also allow you to sit the reverb lower and still have it 'felt' and noticeable.


Other than that, try combining reverbs with delays as that can also get you to places you won't reach with a reverb alone. Try putting a delay before the 'verb, then try putting one after it instead, and note the changes in the output simply switching the signal chain about can have (in this case you go from the delay also being 'reverbed', to the reverb triggering further delays).


There are many possibilities and unless you're covering a song you're probably better off discovering your own reverbs and effects as you'll be closer to having your own 'sound' and that's far more desirable than being able to clone other people's!
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#6
That's exactly how I feel when listening to Mumford and Sons! haha. The magic is in the arrangement and performance. Reverb is just an effect.
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#7
I think use a plate setting
6 to 15 ms for pre-delay
1 to 1.5 decay time and push the top end on an eq of the reverb (that gives it that "live" sound)

This wouldn't be exact that should start you in the right direction.
#8
ok thanks for the ideas, il try some out. btw where do you reccomend the reverbs to be put? theres vocals, guitars, piano, drums, and bass all in the song. i was thinking vocals...

hopefully il put up a clip of the song in a bit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#9
also, time-based effects (reverb, delay) are processed as aux tracks and not instantiated directly on the track.
Audio Ecstasy Productions!

Guitar/Backline Tech in the Los Angeles area and on tour!
Custom guitar pedals and cabling for stage and studio!

I set up DAWs and tweak computers to record audio. Hit me up @ audioecstasyproductions[at}gmail.com
#10
It sounds hallish to me. Try a small hall verb and adjust the pre delay to be in time with the song but be at least 20ms. Another thing you could try is putting a short delay on the vocal track and putting reverb only on the delay. You'll probably have to put it on pretty heavy to get it noticeable, but that's ok as there will be enough space after the vocal to let it stand out.

That's just some tricks for vocals. For instruments, you may want different verbs or delays.