#1
i've heard a lot of transposition ( key changing ) while playing solo or chorus in so many metal songs !! but this key changings sounds so normal to a normal humain ( not a musicien i mean ) ! how could i change the key while a song without making it sounds strange =D ??
#2
If the change is not meant to be noticed then what's the point of making a change? key changes within a song should have a purpose don't you think? what good is it otherwise?
#3
well you could do it subtly by changing to a nearby key such as G to C it wont be much of a change like one of two notes

but i think you shouldnt just change the key just for the sake of chanign a key usually a key chamge is meant to sound different but they way you lead to it will affect wether or not it sounds weird
#4
Quote by TrasherFromHell
If the change is not meant to be noticed then what's the point of making a change?

Well, there is a classical ideal that most modulations should be seamless and not abrupt. It is a more challenging and technical way of modulating and provide opportunity to come up with some cool solutions to common problems. Changes in tonality, even if not abrupt and apparent, provide contrast in more subtle ways and is also representative of other things.

But TS, there is no real way to answer your question because it's a pretty hard topic that requires a comfortable grasp on tonal harmony.
#5
Try using chord inversions. E.g. if you're in a minor key and want to modulate to a major [seventh scale degree], try using and inverted i chord and then VII. Try it.
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#6
Maybe this is a bit off-topic, but one thing I have noticed in my experience with music structure is that it is usually way more convienient and simpler to change modes instead of keys. For example, if you compose a whole song in one key (C for example) if you know what you're doing you can make all the little variants in different modes instead (effectively the same pattern you get from changing key, except you can do it all in the same key) Personally, I find it simpler to change modes within one key while composing rather than change key while composing. Sure, you can do both in any song too but do you really need to? With things like music, you generally want to find ways to do the exact same thing but simpler so you can get more done.

Also, one thing I just realized not long ago with this approach is that if you know that a given song is written for one key it is a way simpler matter to play the whole thing in a different key; you play it the same, just moving the whole thing up or down the fretboard a bit generally.

If anyone would like me to elaborate on this, I'll be glad to.
Quote by Jesus
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#7
Quote by JimDawson
Maybe this is a bit off-topic, but one thing I have noticed in my experience with music structure is that it is usually way more convienient and simpler to change modes instead of keys. For example, if you compose a whole song in one key (C for example) if you know what you're doing you can make all the little variants in different modes instead (effectively the same pattern you get from changing key, except you can do it all in the same key) Personally, I find it simpler to change modes within one key while composing rather than change key while composing. Sure, you can do both in any song too but do you really need to? With things like music, you generally want to find ways to do the exact same thing but simpler so you can get more done.

Also, one thing I just realized not long ago with this approach is that if you know that a given song is written for one key it is a way simpler matter to play the whole thing in a different key; you play it the same, just moving the whole thing up or down the fretboard a bit generally.

If anyone would like me to elaborate on this, I'll be glad to.

Well, when you change mode, you have actually changed the key. It's just that the music itself is modal. If you were playing some passage in C major/ionian but started to raise the 4th to become lydian, you're now in the key of G major. You just never tonally target G. And a little thing like raising the 4th is a common alteration of what further modulation starts out with.
#8
I'm still figuring this one out myself, but I guess I'd say this:

Start by identifying the notes the two keys have in common. Use that subset of notes as a bridge between your two keys.

So, for example, if I was transposing from G to F, the notes they have in common are G, A, C, D, and E. (G has sharp Fs, F has flat Bs). So the idea is you first stop playing B-naturals and F-sharps, play a few notes or develop a music idea ... and then come in with the Bb or F-naturals.

Another useful technique is to use a Dom7 chord. Say for example I'm trying to switch from E major to A major. I take an E, replace it with an E7 ... and then segue straight into A. The Dom7 chord really works wonders in smoothing out these transitions.

The nice thing about Dom7 chords is that they fit into a lot of progressions. You can often play a Dom7 where either a major or a minor would fit, diatonically. This gives you a lot of flexibility. What the Dom7 does is imply that it's a V chord. So, for example, if I want to transpose into C major, I have to find a G7 chord first ... and the G7-C transition sets my new key center.

I've written some modulations that work really well, and some don't, and I'm still figuring it out. But I start with that as my guideline.

edit: I know you asked about solo key changes, but you are soloing over chords, right? Never solo in a void - that's just empty technique.
Last edited by HotspurJr at Oct 3, 2011,
#9
Quote by Xiaoxi
Well, there is a classical ideal that most modulations should be seamless and not abrupt. It is a more challenging and technical way of modulating and provide opportunity to come up with some cool solutions to common problems. Changes in tonality, even if not abrupt and apparent, provide contrast in more subtle ways and is also representative of other things.

But TS, there is no real way to answer your question because it's a pretty hard topic that requires a comfortable grasp on tonal harmony.


Yeah, I understand that and see the reasoning behind it, however the composer has a musical purpose for doing that as opposed to doing it for the sake of doing it.

In order to accomplish what the TS is asking about, the topic does need to get deeper into harmony but don't think the TS is interested in doing this for any other reason besides the appeal (if there is any) to being able to hear that change in the music himself and for other ' abnormal humans/musicians' to hear it as well. (Maybe to boost his ego?) no offense TS (because really, I don't know you) but let's be honest, the apparent need to have a big ego is quite prevalent among some musicians, so based on how the TS is asking this question, it kind of comes off as if he/she just wants to appear knowledgeable to other musicians.

I notice I'm coming off like a bit of an a** but I don't intent to. If I'm wrong on this assumptions TS I apologize, ignore me.
#10
^ @ #7

Yeah! But the thing is (and this is just something I have noticed works for me) that I find it more convienient most of the time to simply think of the key as what root I am using as the base of everything and the mode as what shape you're playing. To me it's a neat little trick that someone could use if they want to because it just intuitively feels more organized to me. I wouldn't just solely write everything like that, but it seems to structure things nicely by thinking of it as key=root and mode=notes played. You know what I mean? As the song progresses the key could also change from time to time, but it is always kind of based around the starting key rather than thinking of the terms interchangeably (while they clearly are fundamentally).
Quote by Jesus
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#11
Regardless of TS's intentions, it is better for him to actually figure these things out and understand them himself. Learning more things and how to properly apply them should be encouraged!

I think it's ignorance that starts ego problems anyways...
Quote by Jesus
Gaza Strip- home. At least it was before I fucked ereythang up...
#12
Oh yea, I'm not saying that you have to think about it as a key change. I'm just pointing out that aspect.