#1
Alright, Googling doesn't give me a clear answer here, so I turn to the Musician Talk forum.

I have two questions here...

1) Can someone give me the run down of broken chords and arpeggios and the difference between them?

2) I have an aural theory test this week, and I've been told that we have a section on broken chords. The first note is given, then we have to write in the rest. Do I essentially listen for the notes and hope I recognise them, or what? Does anyone know what I would do?
#2
To quote George Van Eps

"Arpeggios are melted chords, and chords are frozen arpeggios."

Listen to the tonality of the notes that follow. Does it sound major, minor, dominant etc? Then relate that tonality back to your given note.

For example, if your note is D, and the broken chord/arpeggio that follows sounds like it has a dominant tonality, then you'll know what notes make up a D7 chord...won't you?
#3
1. Broken chords and arpeggios are the same thing. Notes of a chord being played individually rather than all at one time.

2. Surely they tell you this in class? They will probably play major/minor/augmented/diminished arpeggios and you just have to notate them. They might only use root position arpeggios or they could include inversions, I'm not in your class so I can't really tell you.
Last edited by Jesse Clarkson at Oct 4, 2011,
#4
Quote by mdc
To quote George Van Eps

"Arpeggios are melted chords, and chords are frozen arpeggios."

Listen to the tonality of the notes that follow. Does it sound major, minor, dominant etc? Then relate that tonality back to your given note.

For example, if your note is D, and the broken chord/arpeggio that follows sounds like it has a dominant tonality, then you'll know what notes make up a D7 chord...won't you?


So my understanding of an arpeggio is it's basically the notes of the chord played out individually?
Then what's a broken chord? Or are they the same? I've always heard them to be different...

Quote by Jesse Clarkson
1. Broken chords and arpeggios are the same thing. Notes of a chord being played individually rather than all at one time.

2. Surely they tell you this in class? They will probably play major/minor/augmented/diminished arpeggios and you just have to notate them. They might only use root position arpeggios or they could include inversions, I'm not in your class so I can't really tell you.



Ah thanks.

Alrighty, that's basically what I was looking for. There'll no doubt be inversions, so I need to be on the lookout for that.
Last edited by tyler_j at Oct 4, 2011,
#5
There are lots of ways of notating broken chords, dsepending on the rhythm you use and how many notes are used in each pattern.

For example you could have a 4-note pattern (like staright 16ths), or a 3-note pattern such as triplets, or 1 quarter note followed by two 8th notes.

I doubt they'll make it too complex in terms of rhythm though.
#6
There can be a difference between broken chords and arpeggios.

Generally the distinction is that arpeggios go in one direction (all up) C E G C and broken chords have a change in direction like C (up) G (down) E (down) C. If that's at all clear...
#7
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
There can be a difference between broken chords and arpeggios.

Generally the distinction is that arpeggios go in one direction (all up) C E G C and broken chords have a change in direction like C (up) G (down) E (down) C. If that's at all clear...


This.

Alberti bass - Broken chord

Left hand accompaniment in Chopin's nocturne in C# minor - Broken chord

Intro to Debussy's Ballade - Arpeggios

The distinction I'd make is that broken chords have their roots in accompaniment. Chopin's first etude goes C G C E C G C E etc, which I'd refer to as an arpeggio.
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Oct 4, 2011,
#8
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
There can be a difference between broken chords and arpeggios.

Generally the distinction is that arpeggios go in one direction (all up) C E G C and broken chords have a change in direction like C (up) G (down) E (down) C. If that's at all clear...


That makes sense.
I looked at the exercise on broken chords that we're doing, and say if it goes, say, 1, 5 and 3 in a major triad, that would be a broken chord? But if it went 1, 3 and then 5, that's an arpeggio?