#1
For the college I'm interested in applying at, I am required to learn a few classical guitar pieces. The problem with this is that I've never played classical. I've played electric guitar for a few years now, however. My knowledge of reading music is minimal at best, and as I've said I haven't ever played a classical piece on guitar. Is there any way I can give myself a crash course of sorts in how to do this?
#4
I used to use this, if you really keep at it, it could help you improve

http://www.emusictheory.com/practice.html
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#5
Quote by PuddleJumper11
Yeah, that's actually the book I'm using now haha.

Are you going to be given a piece to play, or can you choose your own?

I ask because classical guitars are traditionally played with fingers, so a tailored arrangement would be problematic for a plectrum player.
#6
Prepare an etude of moderate difficulty by the following:

Sor
Giuliani
Carulli
Carcassi
Aguado
From the solo guitar literature, prepare one baroque piece and one romantic piece.

That's what the website says... To be perfectly honest, I'm not sure what that means.
#7
Quote by PuddleJumper11
Prepare an etude of moderate difficulty by the following:

Sor
Giuliani
Carulli
Carcassi
Aguado
From the solo guitar literature, prepare one baroque piece and one romantic piece.

That's what the website says... To be perfectly honest, I'm not sure what that means.

I think Delcamp.us might be helpful for this.
#8
The book Pumping Nylon will become your new bible. Get it. Read it. Practice the exercises. Don't freak out. Is it the music school of a college or an actual music school that doesn't let you in if you don't pass the audition? If it's the latter you have no hope and need to spend time practicing. If it's the first then don't freak out! If you don't pass the audition that just means that they'll put you in remedial music classes until you do pass your audition. You'll probably be given instruction by a grad student at first just to get you up to par.
#9
Quote by vjferrara
The book Pumping Nylon will become your new bible. Get it. Read it. Practice the exercises. Don't freak out. Is it the music school of a college or an actual music school that doesn't let you in if you don't pass the audition? If it's the latter you have no hope and need to spend time practicing. If it's the first then don't freak out! If you don't pass the audition that just means that they'll put you in remedial music classes until you do pass your audition. You'll probably be given instruction by a grad student at first just to get you up to par.


It's the music school within a college I believe. I assume that the latter is a place like Berklee?
#10
Trinity's grade exams are for both plectrum and classical guitar, so their set pieces should be possible for a plectrum player.

'moderate difficulty' is a little vague. You might assume it's equivalent to grade 3-5 the Trinity syllabus.

http://www.trinitycollege.co.uk/resource/?id=4194

EDIT.
I think hiring a guitar tutor to coach you thru might save you some trouble.

http://www.guitarfoundation.org/drupal/connections

http://www.melbay.com/findateacher.asp
Last edited by another_dave at Oct 4, 2011,
#11
Quote by PuddleJumper11
Prepare an etude of moderate difficulty by the following:

Sor
Giuliani
Carulli
Carcassi
Aguado
From the solo guitar literature, prepare one baroque piece and one romantic piece.

That's what the website says... To be perfectly honest, I'm not sure what that means.



So you'll want to look up etudes (or studies, estudios, they mean the same thing) by each of those composers.

Those composers all come from the 19th century so there's not going to be many overly interesting things going on in the music, just lots of tonic-dominant shifting and maybe a little bit of chromaticism.

In regards to the solo guitar literature, I'm not entirely sure why they worded it that way, but you'll be wanting to prepare some music from both the baroque and romantic period.

There's heaps of repertoire available from the baroque period that has been transcribed from lute, violin and harpsichord partitures.

If you're looking at a baroque piece of moderate difficulty, look at the Bach Prelude in D Minor BWV 999 (Originally in C Minor).

Considering Romantic repertoire, guitar music is a late bloomer in that regard due to the nature of the Romantic period of music and its way of thinking (guitars were too quiet, not resonant enough and wasn't considered sophisticated enough for it).

Check out Francisco Tarrega's stuff for an idea of Romantic guitar.