#1
Hey, so ive learnt a bit about modes and now im practicing them over chord progressions. lets say im playing in C Ionian in position 1. what im wondering is, what are the other positions. i know the 7 positions, Ionian, Dorian, etc. but this position 1 of C Ionian doesn't match any of those 7 positions and fit in, its just a major scale.

so what im asking is how do i find the other positions, or where are they?
im using : http://www.justinguitar.com/en/SC-111-IonianMode.php .(you can see the "position 1" there.

i hope im not posting something posts every day, but ive trolled and trolled and keep getting confused and cant make sense of this. i'd really appreciate help, ive been trying to figure this out for 3 days now
#2
May I suggest that you read a few of the crusades articles found on this website;

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/general_music/the_crusade_part_i.html

Those should give you a basic understanding of keys. It seems to me like you are lacking an understanding of what scales are and how they are formed.

The notes of the C major scale are CDEFGABC.

If you want to play that scale a position higher you could start on the D note (move your hand two frets higher than you would if you were starting on the C note) and from there play E, F, G, A, B, C and so on untill you run out of stings and have to play the notes descending.
If you wanna play that a position higher simply take those notes and move them either one fret or two frets higher, depending on the degree of the scale - the C will move up two, the E will move up one etc, in order to stay within the key - in C major there is CDEFGAB, so there is no C#, D#, F#, G# or A# (you need to know the chromatic scale and be able to work out the notes of the fretboard for this), playing three notes per string, except on the B string to follow the example of your diagram (which is a shape used in the CAGED system btw) - in truth you can change the string with only two notes depending on what is most comfortable for that position.

Note well that you are not now playing in D Dorian (as is the common misconception around here), but are simply playing the C major scale in a higher position, perhaps not starting on the root note (D instead of C). You can do the same starting on other scale notes, building a pattern that fits the notes of the scale. If you do read The Crusade articles as I suggested you should gain a good understanding of how to construct the major scale (in terms of whole and half steps from the root) which will make this much easier.


Now you may find what I said to be confusing - Ill admit its far from the best way to explain the idea but my reason for explaining it like that is to encourage you to work out different ways to create scale shapes for yourself and hopefully get you to think in terms of notes and scale degrees rather than patterns. Too many people learn scales as shapes and don't see them as a sequence of notes that can be played in many ways on the guitar's fretboard.
I made a massive leap in my playing a couple years ago when I spent a while working out for myself seven positions to play the major scale and it all suddenly clicked for me and really demystified the fretboard.

The shapes that I worked out happened to be the 3nps (notes per string) shapes that you will be aware of if you are a fan of Paul Gilbert. You could probably find some fretboard diagrams if you googled 'three notes per string major/minor/diatonic scale shapes' but I would strongly recommend working it out for yourself first, thinking in terms of notes on strings and not dots on a grid.
The other well known system of memorizing diatonic scale positions (as well as chords and arpeggios) is known as the CAGED system, I dont have too much experience with that but again Id recommend learning some major scale theory and try applying yourself first.


edit; Alan's diagram should illustrate what Im saying about there being plenty of ways to finger the C major scale all over the fretboard. Draw it or print it out (a bigger version, I think JustinGuitar has some blank fretboard diagrams somewhere) and study it. And yes, modes are a different thing. And no, Guitar Hero will not help, even on expert.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Oct 4, 2011,
#4
The C major scale already covers the fretboard:



Modes are different.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#5
^edited btw
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#6
Quote by Hydra150
And no, Guitar Hero will not help, even on expert.


Really?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#7
Quote by AlanHB
Really?



Really, I played that thing all throughout highschool and I was still lost when it came to connecting different areas of the fretboard mid solo. All those wasted evenings ...
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#8
Quote by Hydra150
Really, I played that thing all throughout highschool and I was still lost when it came to connecting different areas of the fretboard mid solo. All those wasted evenings ...


You'd think it would be pretty easy, considering it is the same as if you had a guitar with 5 frets and 1 string. Weird.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#9
Quote by AlanHB
You'd think it would be pretty easy, considering it is the same as if you had a guitar with 5 frets and 1 string. Weird.


Now that you mention it, I was quite worried the first time I plucked a note past the fifth fret on one of my 'real' guitars and found that it actually still produced a noise - the guy in the repair shop insisted that this was fairly common. The main problem that I have faced as an advancing guitarist is that you find very few non-plastic axes that are colour coded in the way that I am used to.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Oct 4, 2011,
#10
Quote by hallaatyaboi
Hey, so ive learnt a bit about modes and now im practicing them over chord progressions. lets say im playing in C Ionian in position 1. what im wondering is, what are the other positions. i know the 7 positions, Ionian, Dorian, etc. but this position 1 of C Ionian doesn't match any of those 7 positions and fit in, its just a major scale.

so what im asking is how do i find the other positions, or where are they?
im using : http://www.justinguitar.com/en/SC-111-IonianMode.php .(you can see the "position 1" there.

i hope im not posting something posts every day, but ive trolled and trolled and keep getting confused and cant make sense of this. i'd really appreciate help, ive been trying to figure this out for 3 days now


This should help...

http://www.discoverguitaronline.com/diagrams/view/33
shred is gaudy music
#11
Quote by Hydra150
Now that you mention it, I was quite worried the first time I plucked a note past the fifth fret on one of my 'real' guitars and found that it actually still produced a noise - the guy in the repair shop insisted that this was fairly common. The main problem that I have faced as an advancing guitarist is that you find very few non-plastic axes that are colour coded in the way that I am used to.


The way I got around it was by painting each string different colours and then wrapping the guitar in cling wrap. Try it out!
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud