#1
Alrighty, now this has troubled me for a little while, but I can never determine which inversion is which sometimes.
I understand that the 3rd on the bottom is a 1st inversion and the 5th on the bottom is the 2nd inversion, however I've come upon a chord that stumped me.

I posted a thread in the pit recently and got help from Xiaoxi, who helped me determine chords in a score.
However, once chord I have has F, Eb and F in the treble clef, then a high C followed by a lower A in the bass clef in the next two beats.
Now, basic chord building tells me this would be an F dominant 7th chord. That I have no trouble with.

But the chord is clearly an inversion due to the bass notes. But my question is, which inversion do I use?
I was under the impression you use the first 'root' note, which would be C.
So that would mean the 5th is on the bottom, making it a 2nd inversion.
But Xiaoxi told me it was more likely a 1st inversion.
I don't doubt him, but I need to know why.

Is it because you use the lowest note in the chord?
#2
Quote by tyler_j
Alrighty, now this has troubled me for a little while, but I can never determine which inversion is which sometimes.
I understand that the 3rd on the bottom is a 1st inversion and the 5th on the bottom is the 2nd inversion, however I've come upon a chord that stumped me.

Is it because you use the lowest note in the chord?

You answered your own question man.
#3
Quote by DiminishedFifth
You answered your own question man.


Yeah, I get that, but if I'm looking at a score of music and I've got both the 3rd and 5th in the bass clef, which do I use?
Do I use the lowest, or the first note to come along?
#4
Quote by tyler_j
Yeah, I get that, but if I'm looking at a score of music and I've got both the 3rd and 5th in the bass clef, which do I use?
Do I use the lowest, or the first note to come along?

Oh ok, I see what you're saying now.

When someone is saying that the inversion is the note in the bass they don't mean the bass clef (though that could happen). The bass note is the lowest note. So yes, it would be in 1st inversion (assuming the A is the lowest note).
#5
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Oh ok, I see what you're saying now.

When someone is saying that the inversion is the note in the bass they don't mean the bass clef (though that could happen). The bass note is the lowest note. So yes, it would be in 1st inversion (assuming the A is the lowest note).



Gotcha, yeah, for example, I'm determining the chords in a bar for piano peice that uses both the bass and treble clef.
There's three beats per bar, first beat is F, Eb and F in the treble, then the second beat is a C in the bass, then the last beat is then a lower A in the bass. Which would make A the root note, then?
Last edited by tyler_j at Oct 4, 2011,
#6
Quote by tyler_j
Gotcha, yeah, for example, I'm determining the chords in a bar for piano peice that uses both the bass and treble clef.
There's three beats per bar, first beat is F, Eb and F in the treble, then the second beat is a C in the bass, then the last beat is then a lower A in the bass. Which would make A the root note, then?

If we assume that the whole bar is one chord, which it probably is, then the A is the 3rd whereas F is the root. A is the bass.
#7
Quote by DiminishedFifth
If we assume that the whole bar is one chord, which it probably is, then the A is the 3rd whereas F is the root. A is the bass.


Admittedly, this test I'm doing is written rather strangely, so I'm assuming they're wanting both the treble and the bass clefs used together to make the chord.
I only say that due to the fact that an F7 with a first inversion makes more sense than the other possibilities.
#8
Quote by tyler_j
Admittedly, this test I'm doing is written rather strangely, so I'm assuming they're wanting both the treble and the bass clefs used together to make the chord.
I only say that due to the fact that an F7 with a first inversion makes more sense than the other possibilities.



If the staff looks like this then that's not strange at all... that's how you read that. Every note playing at the same time creates some sort of chord.

But yes, that's the chord.
#9
Quote by DiminishedFifth


If the staff looks like this then that's not strange at all... that's how you read that. Every note playing at the same time creates some sort of chord.

But yes, that's the chord.



Fantastic, thanks for the help, buddy