#1
Hi guys,

I've had a little trouble with my microphone as of late. It seems to have a watery/muffled/annoying quality to it when recording.....Anything, whether it's an instrument plugged in, or me speaking.

First I tried recording with Audacity and it had this problem, then I tried a program called 'Debut Video Capture software'

But not avail.

Here is a sample I made. (You will have to listen for a bit to hear it)

http://www.mediafire.com/?68eypa3yuxwpsjq

I have been all over to find an answer. It even does it when I record with a good quality headset. So I'm thinking, possibly something to do with the configuration.

Thanks UG.

\m/
#3
Quote by Usernames sucks
Im not a professional, but noise gate?


I'm not sure. Maybe.
I don't think it will solve the problem entirely, seeing as just regular speaking, directly into the microphone (No wires or anything), as if I were talking to someone on skype or something, seems to muffle/water up as well.

It's bugging me, although I do have a different computer I could possibly use, I still want to know what's going on.

A quote from the TV show Scrubs

"It's so much easier to deal with, now that I know what it is"

I like it
#4
Erm... not to undermine your intelligence, but when you say microphone and then say 'no wires or anything' it gives me the impression you're talking about the built-in microphone of a laptop...

Are you seriously trying to record anything with that?

Then there's the fact you mentioned a 'good quality headset', which I doubt considerably (a good quality headset costs several hundred pounds, unless you're on about a computer/gaming headset, in which case they aren't useful for recording other than as a talkback mic... they're a long way off from professional recording quality), but why would you record with a headset anyway?

Finally, you also said with instruments plugged in - are you talking about the computer's mic input? That shouldn't be used for professional quality recordings in a million years for reasons I can't even be bothered to explain again, but seriously... if you are having trouble with the sound/soundcard on your laptop you need an audio interface (if you are serious about recording, anyway) and you will bypass the low-quality stock audio components of your laptop.

So what 'microphone' are you talking about? Built-in mic, headset mic, laptop mic input or all three?

As for your problem, it's most likely to do with the settings for your soundcard or computer's audio I/O if it occurs with all those methods equally, but it's hard to say without knowing your signal chain or hearing the problem.


Edit: And I'm not going to download the file just to hear the problem - upload it to somewhere we can actually hear it (UG profile, soundcloud, soundclick, dropbox etc.) or most people, myself included, won't bother to listen.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Oct 5, 2011,
#5
Quote by DisarmGoliath
Erm... not to undermine your intelligence, but when you say microphone and then say 'no wires or anything' it gives me the impression you're talking about the built-in microphone of a laptop...

Are you seriously trying to record anything with that?

Then there's the fact you mentioned a 'good quality headset', which I doubt considerably (a good quality headset costs several hundred pounds, unless you're on about a computer/gaming headset, in which case they aren't useful for recording other than as a talkback mic... they're a long way off from professional recording quality), but why would you record with a headset anyway?

Finally, you also said with instruments plugged in - are you talking about the computer's mic input? That shouldn't be used for professional quality recordings in a million years for reasons I can't even be bothered to explain again, but seriously... if you are having trouble with the sound/soundcard on your laptop you need an audio interface (if you are serious about recording, anyway) and you will bypass the low-quality stock audio components of your laptop.

So what 'microphone' are you talking about? Built-in mic, headset mic, laptop mic input or all three?

As for your problem, it's most likely to do with the settings for your soundcard or computer's audio I/O if it occurs with all those methods equally, but it's hard to say without knowing your signal chain or hearing the problem.


Edit: And I'm not going to download the file just to hear the problem - upload it to somewhere we can actually hear it (UG profile, soundcloud, soundclick, dropbox etc.) or most people, myself included, won't bother to listen.



Ok, here is the file uploaded to sound cloud http://soundcloud.com/evilpancakeman/the-annoying-mufflings-of-my#


I see where you are coming from, not the best quality equipment or anything. Although, even when I'm not recording instruments, with either piece of equipment, it still has this 'effect'.


So it's not just my guitar that muffles. It pretty much anything I record;

In my gaming headset (Speaking, and recording instruments)
In my built in microphone (Same thing^^)
And directly plugged in (Just instruments)


Edit:

It sounds alright on my other computer, using the 'In-line Jack', but It's only clean. So I took it down to my bedroom, plugged my guitar into my amp and my amp into the 'microphone' port.

I don't think that's the issue, because it sounds fine when I have this setup on my desktop, using the 'In-line' port.

But, thanks for your insight
Last edited by evilpancakeman at Oct 6, 2011,
#6
Could simply be the settings on the laptop of Sound > Recording settings > . Microphone boost could be crappy for quality. Turn the sound engancement off exept DC offset. I've only ever recorded guitar to laptop in FL studio via input and that was pretty clear, if a little lacking in the deep distorted sound I wanted.
#7
something is gained too high. gain staging matters at every point
Audio Ecstasy Productions!

Guitar/Backline Tech in the Los Angeles area and on tour!
Custom guitar pedals and cabling for stage and studio!

I set up DAWs and tweak computers to record audio. Hit me up @ audioecstasyproductions[at}gmail.com