#1
For those learning the fretboard this diagram might be useful. It shows intervals from root notes on every string.

The root notes (marked as '1') can be at any fret position.

The most common interval names are shown. Those frets without named intervals are the less common intervals, which can be derived from the interval at the next fret e.g. b5, #4, etc.



It can be used to experiment with custom chord voicings and inversions. For instance, say I want to find a way to play G minor on the top 4 strings with the root note on the 4th string. I find the '1' on the 4th string. I look for 'm3' and '5' on the top three strings. I see they're two frets down from the root on the 4th, along with a doubling of the root. I then work out the fingering with the root at the 5th fret (G).
Last edited by Jehannum at Oct 7, 2011,
#2
That's pretty nifty imo, good job. As long as the user understands chord construction, this diagram will be a good aid.
#3
Stuck!
This is a great idea. The C-A-G-E-D system is great, but this will help me with making inversions etc thanks
#4
Can someone explain the different letters and symbols?
Gear:
Ibanez RGT6EX
Line 6 Spider 3 15
Hobner 265

Quote by Lost Dog
People absolutely love to see horrible accidents and murders, as well as any sort of fighting really. Just look at the news. We wouldn't watch it if it was boring.
#5
Great job! I'll be sure to save it on my hard drive

EDIT: They are intervals, 1 being the root note, 2 is the second, m3 is the minor third, M3 is the major third and so on. It's useful if you want to visualize chord construction on a fretboard. For example, for a major triad you would look for 1, M3 and 5.

EDIT2: Also, M7 is a major seventh and the triangle and seven is a minor seventh.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
Last edited by Flibo at Oct 5, 2011,
#6
There is something like a big 9 and a small 2 in the same fret,what do such numbers mean?
Gear:
Ibanez RGT6EX
Line 6 Spider 3 15
Hobner 265

Quote by Lost Dog
People absolutely love to see horrible accidents and murders, as well as any sort of fighting really. Just look at the news. We wouldn't watch it if it was boring.
#7
For example, C to D in the same octave would be a major 2nd. If the D is above one octave it will be labelled a major 9.

A-3-5


E-
B---3
G-7-
D-
A-3-3
E-


Intervals exceeding one octave are known as compound intervals.
Last edited by mdc at Oct 5, 2011,
#8
Damn, just noticed the stupid wobbly underline from Word's spellchecker on the image. Perhaps I can claim it means that that major third is special somehow.

Or perhaps I'll just fix it.
#10
Since when does a Delta 7 fall at the b7 level?

I don't think as much of the diagram as others do, I suppose. Its cumbersome.

Why not just learn a 1 octave Major scale, and learn to say all the intervals that way, and then understand how that relationship changes at the B string?

Of course, you'd have to be expert at instantly naming the notes on the neck. To make instant use of those intervals.

The other problem...is intuitively understanding that especially on the guitar, the chords and such are NOT found in order, For example a chord from the 6th string in an E Formation is a Root, 5th, Root, Major 3rd.

Its not R 3 5, *only* and if you tried that, you'd end up with a G Form chord. Point I am making is intervals and the knowledge of an R 3 5, only gets you so far. So you have to be able to intuitively know, where is it best to play the 3rd, where is it best to play that b7, should I eliminate the 5 in virtue of more important chord tones, etc. I am all for knowing the intervals, but they only go so far...you have to understand the neck of the guitar no matter what, or your gonna find yourself in a bind quickly.

Best,

Sean
#11
Isn't triangle-7 and M7 the same thing? Switching from triangle-7 to m7 or b7 in the diagram seems logic to me.
#12
Is there supposed to be an image attached? Cuz im not seeing one?
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#13
Looking at that makes me dizzy, even when I already know the information.
#14
I'll make corrections if any errors are pointed out. So would m7 be better instead of the delta 7?
#15
Yes. Delta 7 makes me think of a major7 chord. Or a gradient. Actually, just a delta even without a 7 makes me think of a major7 chord.
Last edited by Ulfe at Oct 5, 2011,
#16
I've changed it. Darn me misremembering the meaning of delta! I think I had "D for Dominant" in mind. Sorry about that.
#17
Quote by Sean0913
Since when does a Delta 7 fall at the b7 level?

I don't think as much of the diagram as others do, I suppose. Its cumbersome.

Why not just learn a 1 octave Major scale, and learn to say all the intervals that way, and then understand how that relationship changes at the B string?

Of course, you'd have to be expert at instantly naming the notes on the neck. To make instant use of those intervals.

The other problem...is intuitively understanding that especially on the guitar, the chords and such are NOT found in order, For example a chord from the 6th string in an E Formation is a Root, 5th, Root, Major 3rd.

Its not R 3 5, *only* and if you tried that, you'd end up with a G Form chord. Point I am making is intervals and the knowledge of an R 3 5, only gets you so far. So you have to be able to intuitively know, where is it best to play the 3rd, where is it best to play that b7, should I eliminate the 5 in virtue of more important chord tones, etc. I am all for knowing the intervals, but they only go so far...you have to understand the neck of the guitar no matter what, or your gonna find yourself in a bind quickly.

Best,

Sean



Sear, I believe you're bias towards your own methods should not under value an incredibly powerful diagram like the one above.


Kernel Chords or as others like to call them Shell Voicings are hidden in plain sight in this beautiful diagram.

This diagram is a gold mine for those getting into jazz harmony and have no idea wtf a dominant 7th or C6 chord is. And more importantly how to find one when you need to.


From the 6th string look at the root (1) and notice the m7 on the 4th (D) string. Also take note of the M3 on the 3rd (G) string. I'll tab it out what i want you to play.
----
----
-9-- <---M3
-8-- <---m7
----
-8-- <---Root

Hear that? That is your dominant 7th sound right there. THE jazz chord Mmmhmmm.

*Do note that we've left out the 5th(chord tone). This is a common practice in jazz and a topic of debate that is better left outside the scope of this post.


This shape can be moved up and down the entire length of the 6th string to form a Dominant 7th chord E.G By playing the above shape on the 5th fret (6th string) You form a A Dominant 7th chord.

We can also modify this shape to alter the chord itself.

To make this into a Minor 7th you would simply flatten the M3 thus the above shape becomes...

----
----
-8-- <---m3
-8-- <---m7
----
-8-- <---Root

To make the first shape a Major 7th

----
----
-9-- <--- M3
-9-- <-- M7
----
-8-- <---Root

I urge you to play these to really hear what I'm talking about.

Now as an exercise find the same 3 chords I just derived from the diagram and learn all the shell voicings with the root on each string.

I'll start off with giving you the Dominant 7th shape with the root on the 5th string.

---
---
-3- <--m7
-2- <--M3
-3- <--Root
---

This is also a C7 but notice how the timbre and tone is slightly different than the very first shape I tabbed. Hence "voicings".

Study basic chord theory (or chord harmony) to understand the nomenclature surrounding these "fancy" chords.

A simple google search for chord theory yielded these results.

http://www.museweb.com/ag/chord_form.html

http://www.scenicnewengland.net/guitar/chords/chords.htm

http://www.jazzguitar.be/jazz_guitar_chord_theory.html

Look at the 3rd link. It gets right to it.
#18
I always found charts like that to be overwhelming. it's hard to know what to focus on. it's kinda like one of those charts that show all the notes on the neck. It's like "yeah, they are there", but it's very difficult to actually learn them that way.


A good way to learn/memorize intervals IME is by 1st learning the intervals in the Major scale (from root to each scale step) as a reference point. From there it's easy to learn the others, for instance once you know a M7 it's easy to learn a m7. or from a P5 to a d5. (or A5)
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Oct 9, 2011,
#19
Cheers! I'm currently memorizing modes and needed something like this so I can hit over the fretboard with the patterns.
#21
Gmunk- yes. I learnt (to instant recognition etc) them afew at a time. Octave fifth fourth third sixth second seventh on to 10ths etc. There are only the seven basic intervals in a normal scale and they can be modified w/# and flats for the chromatic scales.
#22
Forget about intervals.

Draw another diagram with scale degrees.

Thank me later.
#23
Quote by plemberton
Cheers! I'm currently memorizing modes and needed something like this so I can hit over the fretboard with the patterns.


Youll be back.... Then you will see how mean we all are in here....

Edit (might as well make one useful post for the day): I think its super awesome that you took the time making the diagram, but.... Like someone said, its too much information. Ive never been able to use those charts, they always confuse me.

But your helping others, and thats what its all about right?
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
Last edited by vampirelazarus at Jan 20, 2012,
#24
Quote by bubbamc119
Forget about intervals.

Draw another diagram with scale degrees.

Thank me later.

modes are a social construct
#25
Quote by Rahguzar
Sear, I believe you're bias towards your own methods should not under value an incredibly powerful diagram like the one above.


Kernel Chords or as others like to call them Shell Voicings are hidden in plain sight in this beautiful diagram.

This diagram is a gold mine for those getting into jazz harmony and have no idea wtf a dominant 7th or C6 chord is. And more importantly how to find one when you need to.


From the 6th string look at the root (1) and notice the m7 on the 4th (D) string. Also take note of the M3 on the 3rd (G) string. I'll tab it out what i want you to play.
----
----
-9-- <---M3
-8-- <---m7
----
-8-- <---Root

Hear that? That is your dominant 7th sound right there. THE jazz chord Mmmhmmm.

*Do note that we've left out the 5th(chord tone). This is a common practice in jazz and a topic of debate that is better left outside the scope of this post.


This shape can be moved up and down the entire length of the 6th string to form a Dominant 7th chord E.G By playing the above shape on the 5th fret (6th string) You form a A Dominant 7th chord.

We can also modify this shape to alter the chord itself.

To make this into a Minor 7th you would simply flatten the M3 thus the above shape becomes...

----
----
-8-- <---m3
-8-- <---m7
----
-8-- <---Root

To make the first shape a Major 7th

----
----
-9-- <--- M3
-9-- <-- M7
----
-8-- <---Root

I urge you to play these to really hear what I'm talking about.

Now as an exercise find the same 3 chords I just derived from the diagram and learn all the shell voicings with the root on each string.

I'll start off with giving you the Dominant 7th shape with the root on the 5th string.

---
---
-3- <--m7
-2- <--M3
-3- <--Root
---

This is also a C7 but notice how the timbre and tone is slightly different than the very first shape I tabbed. Hence "voicings".

Study basic chord theory (or chord harmony) to understand the nomenclature surrounding these "fancy" chords.

A simple google search for chord theory yielded these results.

http://www.museweb.com/ag/chord_form.html

http://www.scenicnewengland.net/guitar/chords/chords.htm

http://www.jazzguitar.be/jazz_guitar_chord_theory.html

Look at the 3rd link. It gets right to it.



Since someone necroe'd this link I have gotten to see that someone "called me out" as biased.

Yes I am biased towards my own methods...till the day I die. Not because of them coming from me, as if I'm inherently some magical being called to bestow my great wisdom towards the rest of these people. I'm just a dude. But I am definitely biased towards the methods I teach and since day 1, I have never backed down - I'm the Ron Paul of guitar teachers, you might say!

But I digress...

I don't get this intellectual "double talk" lecture from you. The diagram was flawed and I pointed it out. Can I claim bias against it? Yes. I think its far better to know the notes on the neck, and then know the notes of any chord. And then to do that in real time. Need an E7#9? OK, some people learn the chord shape but do they know the intervals or the note names, like how many of these people knew that the #9 is an FX?

Please don't try to lecture me with drop voicing education. I am not a jazz player but I have studied a fair amount of it under Jimmy Bruno. I appreciate the guitar article, but that has nothing to do with the price of tea in China, and is not germane to the subject of why I find it unwieldy. Anything that I have to look at a diagram to understand is impractical compared to simply knowing the notes of any chord, "kernel", or triad with extensions and altered tones....whatever you wish to call it. If you make a chart, and I see a mistake, I'll point it out, just as I would hope others would do for me.

If you are getting into Jazz Harmony, then learn your triads and extensions, learn your chord formulae. You dont need the chart if you know your notes on the neck and the notes of a chord. I can name any interval, any chord and any note instantly...and I find that if I used this chart, I'd never be able to do that.

Best,

Sean