#1
I haven't been around for a while. Decided that I had had enough of being trolled and ganged up on, coupled with suddenly developing a life. But now I'm back again, at least to creep on occasion, and I must say I am disappoint.

When I left Cliff Burton was viewed as a God here, the greatest guitar player that ever roamed this crazy blue marble we call earth. But now, I don't see any love for the guy; what happened? Did you guys decide that guitar players no longer deserve our respect?

I've made this thread to show that good ole' Cliff is still and shall forever be idolized by so many of us.

The simple fact of the matter is that he completely changed the face of music, especially metal. Not only did he manage to play his bass like a guitar, he managed to make it SOUND like a guitar. In fact, his guitar playing is what got him into Metallica, the band that made it big because of Cliff's immense talent as a guitar player and as a composer. If making one of the most influential metal bands the band it was, wasn't enough; he made it acceptable for bass players to be crushed under the mix, ignored, used as a much less important guitar player, and of course, most importantly, the rise of 80% of bass player's tones sounding like guitars. He is responsible for such amazing musicians as: Jason James, Jeanne Sagan, John Holgado, and half of the people on this forum.

So come on people! Lets give this guy the respect he deserves!
#2
Quote by bass-boy-garith
Not only did he manage to play his bass like a guitar, he managed to make it SOUND like a guitar.

... most importantly, the rise of 80% of bass player's tones sounding like guitars.


Quite personally, I don't see why anyone would their bass to sound like a guitar... I love the thick and rich sounds I can make without the need for some mumbling distortion...
#3
This thread will die. Don't mean to be a douche, I mean I feel the same as you, but others here will murder you....
Quote by Stranglehold
That's it, you're all banned.

Quote by stevebomb
If I wanted to listen to something slow, I'd play some hippie music.
#4
Brilliant!
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<Jon> take the quote of me out your sig plx
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#6
Quote by CheesyRhino
Cliff rules but your rant is going to get a lot of hate

this too.
Quote by Stranglehold
That's it, you're all banned.

Quote by stevebomb
If I wanted to listen to something slow, I'd play some hippie music.
#7
Quote by JF0urnier
Quite personally, I don't see why anyone would their bass to sound like a guitar... I love the thick and rich sounds I can make without the need for some mumbling distortion...


Which makes him one of a kind.
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#8
I never found his bass to sound like a guitar, but more so he made his bass as versatile instrument as the guitar. He developed new ways to play like guitar players find new ways to play their guitars.

He never ever used a pick either, and I hear he was quite good with the keyboards asswell.
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#9
i love cliff, he inspired me to start playing metal and will always be my first bass idol, i can play all of pulling teeth (not all that much to brag aboiut it but i learnt it because i loved him so much)
i even sounded out his last solo live up til the national anthem part.
i was gonna get him tattooed but then decvided that would prolly be a dumb idea haha

when Moses brought down the plagues upon Egypt one of them involved Behringer amps


Dont be so humble, your not that great....
#10
Granted I hate thrash, and don't care for his style, as a musician I can respect what he's done, but at the same time, all he did was play melody lead lines with bass frequency killing distortion if I'm correct. And that's cool, but then again why didn't he just play guitar, with or without an octave pedal. Again it's cool, but it's kind of like putting a piezo pickup in an electric guitar to use as a percussion block with the strings removed? It's still an instrument being played as another.
#11
Quote by Vypor
he made his bass as versatile instrument as the guitar.


I'm sorry to double post, but that's just insulting to all bass players and newbish.
#12
Cliff certainly wasn't the first. Sure, the electric bass didn't seem like such a versatile instrument in it's early days, but both conservative players like James Jamerson and Geezer Butler and "shred" bassists like Entwistle showed it's potential, and were around before Cliff was well-known.

Hell, the bassist from Cream (forgot name) used a Fender Bass VI which is pretty much a guitar with bass strings - and he played it like both a guitar and a bass, depending on the situation.

However, Cliff did help popularize this kind of style and probably was one of the first to use bass effects (fuzz and wah-wah). He just wasn't the first, like I said
Professional lurker since 2009.
#13
Quote by technoguyx
Cliff certainly wasn't the first. Sure, the electric bass didn't seem like such a versatile instrument in it's early days, but both conservative players like James Jamerson and Geezer Butler and "shred" bassists like Entwistle showed it's potential, and were around before Cliff was well-known.

Hell, the bassist from Cream (forgot name) used a Fender Bass VI which is pretty much a guitar with bass strings - and he played it like both a guitar and a bass, depending on the situation.

However, Cliff did help popularize this kind of style and probably was one of the first to use bass effects (fuzz and wah-wah). He just wasn't the first, like I said


Cream - Jack Bruce

And Geezer Butler was at least a wah user
#14
^^ +1

not to sound like a jerk, but I already want to kill this thread with fire, lots and lots of fire.
Im not a cliff hater, he had a good outlook of how to play at a time that worked well for him. If we start an inspirational thread or appreciation thread for him... well where's the stanley clarke who I would say deserve it alot more. I'm actually a metal player not a jazz etc. guy but cliff never did interest me as a player. I honestly find him kind of boring.

But I guess this isnt a thread about my opinion but im bored and on my lunch break and the other threads wern't as entertaining at this point of time. <3
#15
He was certainly a fine bassist who died well before his time. And I wouldn't mind having an Aria CB Signature bass:

"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#16
Quote by FatalGear41
He... died well before his time.


Always seems to be the case with people smooshed by buses

Edit: I just think this thread proves people like him for playing like a guitarist, which is why most bassists don't like him hence no love. Also I think there's an artist appreciation forum for this kind of thing?
Last edited by askrere at Oct 6, 2011,
#17
didn't geezer butler do far more for metal bass than burton?

3/10 ts
modes are a social construct
#18
Quote by Hail
didn't geezer butler do far more for metal bass than burton?

3/10 ts


whats the 3/10?

I think Geezer has a great tone, and he did write a lot of the music, but he doesn't to me do anything huge people emulate.

His tone was great, but he used a guitar amp and cab and blew speakers left and right.

He's a lot like Paul McCartney if I am write saying he wrote a lot of Black Sabbath's songs lyrics and music, so he kind of in a way did more for doom and stoner metal as a musician than a bassist in general