#1
Hey everybody!
I'm a new entry here; my name's Rudy, 26 from Italy!

I've been playing guitar for 7-8 months and, after having established a good foundation in chord vocabulary and some licks/riffs, I've decided to go for Tagliarino's "Guitar Fretboard Workbook".

I have a question for those who are familiar with the patterns/shapes he teaches; in the 7th chapter he asks students to construct each of the 5 scales patterns (based on the respective octave shapes).

Now, I've discovered that, working on the guitar, I prefer to follow my intuition and tactile memory instead of a visual approach (for example I'm faster and more precise when I'm NOT looking at the fretboard).

Tagliarino says to memorize each pattern but he also says to always start playing a scale on the root till the octave. This confuses me a bit.

If you give me the roots I can play almost instantly the scales to the next octave, but I have a lot of difficulty in visualizing the 4 frets vertical pattern.
I kinda work by proximity, so I'm very fluid in building scales ALL around the fretboard, while I struggle to stick to a visual plan. The scales I build aren't enclosed in the vertical 4-frets pattern.

When I let my fingers/ears do their work, I can play scales all around the fretboard and when I miss a degree there's an almost instantaneous muscular correction. But that's not the goal of Tagliarino's book, since he wants you to stay in the 5 vertical positions, as I understand it.

My fingers are anarchists!

So I'm asking to you, guys, with more experience;

1 - What is wrong with my approach? Could I get some benefit from it?

2 - I can't play the vertical patterns because, at times, you gotta start a pattern on the 3rd or 4th degree of a scale and that's not musically-sensed to my ear/fingers! Should I force myself to memorize the 5 scales patterns someway? Is there a correct way to practice scales?


Thanks everybody for your attention
my best to you
rudy
#3
Quote by rodblue
Hey everybody!
I'm a new entry here; my name's Rudy, 26 from Italy!

I've been playing guitar for 7-8 months and, after having established a good foundation in chord vocabulary and some licks/riffs, I've decided to go for Tagliarino's "Guitar Fretboard Workbook".

I have a question for those who are familiar with the patterns/shapes he teaches; in the 7th chapter he asks students to construct each of the 5 scales patterns (based on the respective octave shapes).

Now, I've discovered that, working on the guitar, I prefer to follow my intuition and tactile memory instead of a visual approach (for example I'm faster and more precise when I'm NOT looking at the fretboard).

Tagliarino says to memorize each pattern but he also says to always start playing a scale on the root till the octave. This confuses me a bit.

If you give me the roots I can play almost instantly the scales to the next octave, but I have a lot of difficulty in visualizing the 4 frets vertical pattern.
I kinda work by proximity, so I'm very fluid in building scales ALL around the fretboard, while I struggle to stick to a visual plan. The scales I build aren't enclosed in the vertical 4-frets pattern.

When I let my fingers/ears do their work, I can play scales all around the fretboard and when I miss a degree there's an almost instantaneous muscular correction. But that's not the goal of Tagliarino's book, since he wants you to stay in the 5 vertical positions, as I understand it.

My fingers are anarchists!

So I'm asking to you, guys, with more experience;

1 - What is wrong with my approach? Could I get some benefit from it?

2 - I can't play the vertical patterns because, at times, you gotta start a pattern on the 3rd or 4th degree of a scale and that's not musically-sensed to my ear/fingers! Should I force myself to memorize the 5 scales patterns someway? Is there a correct way to practice scales?


Thanks everybody for your attention
my best to you
rudy


Well, he's trying to teach you the patterns, because they represent where the notes of a particular scale ARE. Once you know the patterns, you can play them any where and in any key. If you're actually playing scales by ear, then it's the same notes. learning to recognize them visually shouldn't give you any trouble. if anything it should reinforce what you are ready are doing.

To answer your 1st question, I believe the problem with your approach is that you're looking at material that you haven't the foundation to understand and/or utilize properly. You've been playing less than a year. I recommend focusing on music fundamentals, basic techniques, and songs.
come back to the scale pattern thing when you're ready for it. a lot of people get so focused on the endgame, that they forget about going through the stages that it takes to get there. The beginning stage is the most important and sadly the one most overlooked.

2 - yes you can play the vertical patterns. You just have to get rid of the hangup. for now though I recommend that you do not learn all of the patterns. I would suggest that you start by just learning the major scale in one pattern and one octave. learn to play it, learn to hear it.
then learn some simple melodies. From there you can take it further, but don't be in a hurry. The better foundation you have, the easier it will be to make sense of everything else.
shred is gaudy music
#4
Quote by Sean0913
I dont think much of his approach, to be honest. I like yours but you're left with some gaps, how will you fill them in in actual playing and application?

Best,

Sean


Hey guys

well I'm really just a super beginner so I'm still figuring out how to fit everything together.

I was feeling the need to explore the fretboard and to musically understand what's going on through all those frets.
I felt, also, the need to be able to express myself suddenly, without overthinking, even through small melodies.

Now that I've learnt the Major Scale Pattern sounds, my fingers are able to rapidly find melodies I hear/sing around the fretboard.
So whereas before it was just a random jumping around to find sounds, I see that now everything makes more sense (musically speaking).

I'm a big believer of learning licks, riffs and learning to see what works by ear (that's what works with me); for this reason the theory has to be practical and Tagliarino was helping me in this direction.

The style I'm aiming at is a Hendrix/Richards chordal-lick style. I love the sound of harmony blending continuosly into melody and viceversa.

Parallel to my theory approach I'm also working on licks/riffs and whole songs memorization (I study mainly blues-texas blues and classical guitar repertoire, which greatly helps with fingers )
#5
It sounds like you are on the right track for the needs that you have. That's all that matters. If it is getting you there and makes you happy, then it's the right move for you. I don't mean to imply that you're not getting anything out of it.

And to be fair, I have my own unique method for teaching the entire fret board, and navigation, that I teach at our Academy online, and as such, I am biased against the other means that are out there, so take what I say with a grain of salt, and realize I am approaching this with a big bias.


Best,

Sean