#1
So i have this interval testing app called earforlife on my iphone. (same thing as goodear.com) It lets you decide if you want to hear a guitar or a piano playing the intervals. I choose all intervals (whitout the octave ,ofcourse). When i lisen to a guitar, and i do 40 turns (40 diffrent interval guesses) i get around 85-90% right. When i chose piano i get around 45-50% right. Why is it this way?? I have learned how each different interval sounds(i dont think about songs). When i hear a piano play it, i i struggle alot to hear what is being played. Its annoying because all interval tests done in my music school is done by a piano. Please help me.
#3
Quote by Zeletros
Play more piano?

Why do you think he plays the piano in the first place?

As for TS, I guess that's just the way it is. Piano and guitar have different kinds of timbre. I think the solution is to listen to more piano intervals.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#4
You're being thrown off by the different tonal characteristic. I'm guessing your main instrument is guitar, so you're used to hearing that more often, and you can kinda connect to the sound better. So, just playing more piano is all you can really do.
#5
Quote by Flibo
Why do you think he plays the piano in the first place?

As for TS, I guess that's just the way it is. Piano and guitar have different kinds of timbre. I think the solution is to listen to more piano intervals.



Then, my tip is to simply "play piano"
#6
Are the intervals you're learning melodic or harmonic? The latter is harder, so if you can split the intervals on a piano, when you go back to melodic ones it should be a bit easier.
#7
Quote by Zeletros
Then, my tip is to simply "play piano"
What happens if you're then asked to transcribe a flute part? "play flute"?

It takes practice, that's all it is.
#8
Quote by Jesse Clarkson
What happens if you're then asked to transcribe a flute part? "play flute"?

It takes practice, that's all it is.



He's not saying he has trouble transcribing music, he's saying that he can identify what is played by a guitar better than the piano.

Probably because he plays guitar, and not the piano.
#9
If he can't identify intervals on other instruments then he will have trouble transcribing, they're very much related.

When I learned how to do ear training, my teacher would play intervals and chords on all sorts of keyboard effects and instruments so that I would not become dependant on certain timbres. I figure it's a reasonable idea.
#10
Quote by Zeletros
He's not saying he has trouble transcribing music, he's saying that he can identify what is played by a guitar better than the piano.

Probably because he plays guitar, and not the piano.
You can learn to identify intervals regardless of instrument. In high school exams I had to transcribe all sorts of instruments. Learning each and every instrument wasn't an option.
#11
Quote by Jesse Clarkson
You can learn to identify intervals regardless of instrument. In high school exams I had to transcribe all sorts of instruments. Learning each and every instrument wasn't an option.


But it certainly does help
#12
I suspect if you spend more time with intervals on piano, your ability to do well with them will improve.

Don't stress about it, and experiment with different instruments sounds in your ear training.

The ear training book I'm constantly recommending (by Keith Wyatt) includes CD with a bunch of patterns for transcribing. They use different intstruments, but I've also noticed that they use different octaves, and that I have a much harder time transcribing stuff in the bass register or higher up on the guitar neck. But it's improving with practice, so, I guess ... that's my advice.

Practice.
#15
Quote by Usernames sucks
May it be that a guitar and a piano just sound diffrent? :/

Well of course. The timbre's are different and your ears are 'tuned' to the sound of a guitar.

But intervals are intervals.
#16
You're not listening properly. I'm not sure how you can recognize a fifth on a guitar but not on an oboe for instance...
#17
The difference in timbre between guitar and piano is very drastic (the difference in timbre between a piano and pretty much all other instruments is rather drastic, to be honest), so the only thing you can do is get more accustomed to the sound of a piano. I used to not be able to tell what octave on a piano matched the octave of my guitar notes, simply because I wasn't accustomed to the timbre. After listening to more piano music and playing a little piano, I got over this problem rather quickly. While it's true that you can't learn to play every instrument out there just to get accustomed to their timbres, I think it's also true that the piano is a more special case here than a cello or an oboe in that the sheer volume and presence of a piano is much greater than many other instruments. Furthermore, if you're going to have your dictation abilities tested, it's most likely going to take place using a piano. Case in point, play some piano. There's no way it could possibly do anything but help you as a musician, and you'll probably like it.