#1
Hey, gang. Hopefully this question has a simple answer.

I record by mic'ing my cabinet with an SM58, which I also use for vocals. Is it worth me getting a 57 just for guitar? I've heard they're functionally the same mic, but I'm fuzzy on such things.

Yes, I am aware I have other options than a 57 if I were to get a second mic. Please don't turn this into a "you should use this kind of mic instead" thread.

Thanks,
CS
#2
The capsules are identical, but I would recommend having both a 57 and a 58. If you place them beside each other but one of them about an inch further from the amp than the other you get two tones that are phase correctly to each other that you can blend later on in the mixdown.
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#3
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#4
I don't know if it's just me but the 57 sounds far superior to the 58. The 58 sounds scooped and really fizzy, where the 57 still sounds scooped but also quite clear. I tried recording with a 58 but it never sounded good no matter what. And no they aren't fakes, both 58's i used are identical, from completely different years (one's 30+ years old and the other 3-5) and i checked to see if they were fake and they aren't. Same with the 57 which i rented.
Last edited by maowcat at Oct 6, 2011,
#6
Quote by Eggmond
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As someone who gets annoyed at the multitude of "how do I record drums" threads that pop up every other day from people too lazy to do a search, I'm totally facepalming right now. I didn't get much sleep last night. Yeah, that's it.

Move along, people. Nothing more to see, here.
#7
Quote by Arch1119
The capsules are identical, but I would recommend having both a 57 and a 58.

Starting your post off fairly well - nothing too wrong here, and having a '57 saves unscrewing the windshield from a '58 for the same sound...


If you place them beside each other but one of them about an inch further from the amp than the other you get two tones that are phase correctly to each other that you can blend later on in the mixdown.

Absolute nonsense, I'm afraid. How can two signals that are taken from different distances possibly be 'phase correct'? Wavelength of a waveform is frequency dependent (simple physics), dictating that the lower the frequency you have, the longer the waveform it creates. Therefore, the lower you go, the more distance between two sources you need in order for them to remain at the right distance to 'lock together', except one will still be out of phase - it will just be approx. 360 degrees/720 degrees/1080 degrees/etc. out of phase (or one complete 'phasor'/oscillation of the sinusoidal wave).

Guitar amps put out some pretty low frequencies (especially without an EQ on-board to HPF the low rumble from palm mutes), and the wavelength of many of these will be greater than 1 inch, therefore at that frequency the waveforms of the two mics will be out of phase with one another at a point where they are cancelling out part of the waveform to a degree.

If you can't get the mics at as close to identical distances when close miking, you need to either time-allign the signals in-the-box in post-production, or move one far enough back to remove the noticeable effects of phase (more of a room mic in that case, and will give more ambience than you may wish to achieve). In the latter case, you would probably be better off just using one mic, particularly if this is live work where you can't time-allign the signals without working out a delay time to apply to one of the mic signals.


Anyway, to answer TS (even though you're satisfied now you're awake ) I have a '57, and a fake '57 (was conned on eBay a while back) and a Sennheiser e906. Live, I often use all three on bands as they'll not know which is the real '57 if I told them one was fake, and noone else will notice anyway due to the rest of the signal chain. For studio work I typically use the e906 and the real '57 together, close-miking with the e906 slightly off-axis but over the cap, and the '57 45 degrees off axis and slightly off-centre.

I wouldn't personally consider buying a '58 myself, for studio work, though they're always useful for live work as a "need a mic for _____, got a spare '58 that will do fine" problem solver.

'58 is more tailored to vocals, hence the larger windshield and better handling noise isolation, but I'd much rather use a nice LDC on vocals or at least a better dynamic like the SM7B or Beyerdynamic M99.
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Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Oct 6, 2011,
#8
Go audix, The I-5 is in some cases better, and a little cheaper I believe, Its the same style as the sm57, that way you wouldnt feel bad buying the same mic, I personally love audix.