#1
Hey
New to the forums and brand new to guitar. I spent around 4 hours last night practicing and the route I'm trying to take is just practicing the hell outta songs til I get them down. So I asked a friend what song would he would suggest for me to start with and he said Badfish by Sublime might be good because most of the song is the same 3 barre chords and that if I practice barre chords from the start it might save me a headache later. So for the moment I'm constantly practicing the barre chord on the third fret (dont remember the name), the fifth fret (I think its an A. identical fingering as the first one), and the seventh fret ( dont remember the name of this one either, but its the same as the other two without the middle finger). As I do these I surprisingly feel like I'm progressing as where I think I could hit the note right 5% of the time at the start, I'm up to about 40% (the third fret one being alot better than my seventh fret one).
I basically have two questions about this:

1) Is there a reason barre chords seem alot easier towards the end of the neck (the third fret one) and its alot harder to get the one closer to the body (the seventh fret one)? EDIT: just wanted to add the guitar I got is an epiphone if that changes anything

2) And my fingertips are hella sore today. Having lurked the internet a little I see that its normal and that callouses are supposed to form making it more numb. Just wanted to ask if its safe to play through the pain.

I apologize for sounding like a complete noob but hopefully as I keep practicing this I'll eventually get it down.
Last edited by dukemasterska at Oct 7, 2011,
#2
1) The closer you are towards the neck of the guitar, the closer the strings are to the neck of the guitar (usually) which makes it easier to press them down. Also, the frets are bigger which, for new guitarists, helps them because it's easier to place their fingers. Later on you'll have the opposite problem, frets too big making it hard to do stretching chords ahah.

2)Just keep playing
#3
Quote by BloodReverence
1) The closer you are towards the neck of the guitar, the closer the strings are to the neck of the guitar (usually) which makes it easier to press them down. Also, the frets are bigger which, for new guitarists, helps them because it's easier to place their fingers. Later on you'll have the opposite problem, frets too big making it hard to do stretching chords ahah.

2)Just keep playing


Wrong. Anything in your human body needs rest after stress, in order to recover. You can push it further, but it will certainly not do any good. Best way is to increasingly practice more every day, but stop if you feel pain. In several months the pain will be unsignificant.
#4
I only played guitar for 1 and a half years or less. I'm doing okay for such a short period of time, but my playing is quite sloppy. Keep practicing bro. Now that I realise how important the my guitar is and how my future relies on my ability to play it, due to the fact that I wanna be in a band, I try to get lots of practice in.
#5
Quote by szekelymihai
Wrong. Anything in your human body needs rest after stress, in order to recover. You can push it further, but it will certainly not do any good. Best way is to increasingly practice more every day, but stop if you feel pain. In several months the pain will be unsignificant.


i believe he meant what you said, that you just supposed to regularly practice to grow the callouses. i started with the acoustic for 3 years and promised myself to play everyday until my fingers hurt (NOT bleed). after those 3 years, my fingertips were so hard i could hold a burning plate for 10 secs before feeling any pain. after i got an electric, i couldn't feel anything from the strings and i could play until i just got tired. same could work for this guy.
#6
i started with the acoustic for 4 years and promised myself to play everyday until my fingers hurt