#1
Do you find yourselves overplaying your own songs? I know you've got to get them rehearsed and stuff for when you record them and play live and stuff but do you ever get kind of annoyed at the amount you end up playing them?

It's like whenever i pick up a guitar i always play my band's stuff automatically and it's starting to become boring to play, i almost have to force myself to play something else. I'm worried they won't sound fresh live but also want them to be tight and well rehersed.

What about you lot?
#2
Nope. I tend to think everything I write is shit about 30 seconds after I write it.
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#3
After i've through the process of writing a song and getting it performance ready I honestly can't stand it I guess you hear it so many times you get sick of it.
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#5
after writing and rehearsing a song until its played well live im usually sick of it

so i try to have a variety so im not playing the same thing every time
#7
Imagine people who write the music, write the lyrics, record it all and produce it all. They must hate their own stuff.

I know Dan Swano did that for Crimson II and his solo album. He wrote all the parts, performed all of them and produced it all. He must loathe his own stuff.
#8
i only get tired of them when recording take after take to get it just perfect
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#9
Definitely, I've written a ton of stuff but I've forgot most of all of them due to boredom.
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#11
Abit of improvving during the song helps to keep a fresh mind when playing it.

Plus, what really makes you re-love those songs is the reaction you can get from the crowd and (if you follow my improv advice) the randomness of playing live.

I know what you mean though, I hate having to practice songs too much, especially if you're only practising because one of the members doesn't know their parts
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#12
Quote by Crazyedd123
Abit of improvving during the song helps to keep a fresh mind when playing it.

Plus, what really makes you re-love those songs is the reaction you can get from the crowd and (if you follow my improv advice) the randomness of playing live.

I know what you mean though, I hate having to practice songs too much, especially if you're only practising because one of the members doesn't know their parts

Yeah definatly. I heard Hatebreed don't decide on setlists before they go onstage, instead the vocalist calls out a song he wants to do and they play it. Keeps it fresh and exciting.
#13
Quote by Afroboy267
Yeah definatly. I heard Hatebreed don't decide on setlists before they go onstage, instead the vocalist calls out a song he wants to do and they play it. Keeps it fresh and exciting.


Hah that's cool, although that must be a real chore for the engineers who have to frantically adjust the mix to suit the song

I like artists who have that 'looseness' to their music, it can range from all-round musicianship (Radiohead) to very skilled musicians (Primus, King Crimson), where the musicians don't overplay their parts, or they have alot of rests in their parts (especially applies to Radiohead and Primus' guitar parts).
Breakfast, Breakfast, it's great for us
We eat, we eat, we eat
That frozen meat
Oh boy, oh boy, oh boy, it can't be beat
#14
Quote by Crazyedd123
Hah that's cool, although that must be a real chore for the engineers who have to frantically adjust the mix to suit the song

I like artists who have that 'looseness' to their music, it can range from all-round musicianship (Radiohead) to very skilled musicians (Primus, King Crimson), where the musicians don't overplay their parts, or they have alot of rests in their parts (especially applies to Radiohead and Primus' guitar parts).

Engineers change the mix to suit songs live?



Edit: (Thats ment to be a picture of someone ready to take notes but it was the best I could find, meh).
#15
Quote by Afroboy267
Engineers change the mix to suit songs live?



Ye, in my college course we had a teacher who is/was a roadie/engineer and he said that setlists are basically a necessity.

For example (I'm using Radiohead as an example because they have a diverse catalogue): Radiohead have a setlist which consists of Creep, Karma Police, Everything in it's right place, and Fake Plastic Trees.

Every single song features very different instruments to each other, each of these instruments would have different timbres and EQ requirements
(To be fair, alot of mixing desks can accomodate a very large amount of channels/instruments (we used one which, theoretically has 48) so the different instruments could be on their own seperate channels).

Some instruments on the other hand (drum kit and vocals) are usually static and it's very unlikely that the performers would change their mics for these. This is why the engineers would have to make changes to them between songs/sets.
If you're doing an electronica song like 'Everything in it's right place' which features many effects on the vocals, followed by a soft song like 'Fake Plastic Trees' which has very soft, tough-of-reverb vocals you'd obviously have to change the settings for the mics.


This may not apply to all bands though, some bands have similar-sounding songs and don't really care about changing the EQ/mix between songs (Sex pistols springs to mind).


Sorry for the Tl;dr comment. It's nice to share information

EDIT: If the technicians/engineers don't know what song you're doing next then the song may sound like shit (bass too loud, vocals too harsh. etc.)
Breakfast, Breakfast, it's great for us
We eat, we eat, we eat
That frozen meat
Oh boy, oh boy, oh boy, it can't be beat
Last edited by Crazyedd123 at Oct 8, 2011,
#16
Quote by Crazyedd123
Hah that's cool, although that must be a real chore for the engineers who have to frantically adjust the mix to suit the song



If they have something like this it's no big deal--I'm sure they have a patch for each song. Easy to change on the fly...

#17
Quote by Crazyedd123
Ye, in my college course we had a teacher who is/was a roadie/engineer and he said that setlists are basically a necessity.

For example (I'm using Radiohead as an example because they have a diverse catalogue): Radiohead have a setlist which consists of Creep, Karma Police, Everything in it's right place, and Fake Plastic Trees.

Every single song features very different instruments to each other, each of these instruments would have different timbres and EQ requirements
(To be fair, alot of mixing desks can accomodate a very large amount of channels/instruments (we used one which, theoretically has 48) so the different instruments could be on their own seperate channels).

Some instruments on the other hand (drum kit and vocals) are usually static and it's very unlikely that the performers would change their mics for these. This is why the engineers would have to make changes to them between songs/sets.
If you're doing an electronica song like 'Everything in it's right place' which features many effects on the vocals, followed by a soft song like 'Fake Plastic Trees' which has very soft, tough-of-reverb vocals you'd obviously have to change the settings for the mics.


This may not apply to all bands though, some bands have similar-sounding songs and don't really care about changing the EQ/mix between songs (Sex pistols springs to mind).


Sorry for the Tl;dr comment. It's nice to share information

EDIT: If the technicians/engineers don't know what song you're doing next then the song may sound like shit (bass too loud, vocals too harsh. etc.)

Oh right, thats interesting. I'm actually studying Music Tech atm so any information I can get is very useful .
#18
I'm on like my 10th play of this in the past couple hours.

edit: Oh, my own songs. On guitar. Nope then.
#19
Quote by jetwash69
If they have something like this it's no big deal--I'm sure they have a patch for each song. Easy to change on the fly...


You have no idea how much that turns me on.

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#20
Quote by jetwash69
If they have something like this it's no big deal--I'm sure they have a patch for each song. Easy to change on the fly...



We used something similar to that. Our Monitor desk was an hefty analogue desk and we had a similar one to that as our front-of-house desk.
I didn't get to learn how to use it though, I would've liked to
Breakfast, Breakfast, it's great for us
We eat, we eat, we eat
That frozen meat
Oh boy, oh boy, oh boy, it can't be beat
#21
Every song my band plays is overplayed. Mostly because the other members never come practice. I need me a new band. lol Me and the guitarist are the only really dedicated members. Even when we play at our own church, we have another person that plays piano instead of our actual member.
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#22
Quote by Afroboy267
You have no idea how much that turns me on.

fapfapfapfapfapfapfapfapfap


She's a very expensive call girl. Sweetwater normally gets $91,000 for her outright, but they have some special deals going on right now if you call them.

Guess that's why even bands as big as Metallica and large venues like stadiums don't own their live mixing gear, but rather outsource the whole thing to production companies who can get enough use out of them to pay them off. It is the music business after all, so gotta keep it profitable.

Set lists are crucial if you have typical gear, but with the really high end consoles with motorized controls and driven by several computers are agile enough that they don't have to totally rely on setlists. Of course, it also depends on how much visual stuff is going on, too, and how much lead-in all that requires for songs.

But there are countless examples of national acts playing stadiums that don't use setlists. It's easier to get away with it in the garage rock genre, so it's no surpise that The White Stripes and Local H are famous for not using set lists. They probably don't have the fancy consoles either, but their stuff is simple enough it doesn't matter.

Chuck Berry is also known to never use set lists. That was an even bigger challenge because he rarely took his own band on the road; he usually hired local musicians and expected them to know his catalogue. He wouldn't rehearse with them and wouldn't tell them what was coming next; he'd just start playing and singing and expect them to recognize the song and join in. It didn't always produce the best results. I know a guy who was at a show with another band and ended up filling in on guitar when one of Mr. Berry's hired guns got fired in the middle of a song for playing a lead part instead of sticking to rhythm.
Last edited by jetwash69 at Oct 9, 2011,
#23
I get sick of them before they're even released.
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