#1
I would like to start playing by ear and through regular notes and I figure the best way would be to know all the notes on the fretboard. Besides just constant practice, is there some exercise or tool I can use to help me memorize and quickly recall the note my finger is pressed on?

Thanks.
#2
what i did was first memorize what the dots are on the low e and a string after that you will start seeing a pattern on the d and g string. Just memorize all the dots, play just the dots while yelling out the correct notes. Then play all the non flat notes even if they dont fall on dots and before you know it u'll know your notes. learning the low e and a notes are key, esp the dots or play major chords using e major shape over the low e string and and all the major chords over the a string using the a major shape.
#3
Hey dude!

First and foremost... Your ear! It's your best tool!

However! I remember learning the notes by learning my barre chords! Basically, Once you learn your E shape Barrechords you should know all the notes from The Open E to the 12th fret on the same string, which is the note E too. You should also know your notes on the A string from your A and C shape barre chords.

Once you know these the rest is easy! It's just octaves (the same notes)

If you play the note F (first fret, E string) then the octave is on the 3rd fret of the D string (F!). The pattern follows on down the neck! ie: 3rd Fret E string = G, 5th fret D string = G!) etc etc etc. The same follows on the A string. Consider it a "2 fret rule".

Once you get to the D and G strings, it becomes a "3 fret rule"..

for example: 7th fret on the D string is an A note. so the 10th fret on the B string will be an A note.

The high e will be just the same as the heavy e.


I don't know if anyone else learnt it this way, it's just how i did it. Hope this helps man, after a while you'll know what note is what just by hearing it.

- Geee
#4
There are many different ways to memorize the fretboard. What worked best for me was a free program called Fretboard Warrior.
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#5
Quote by etcetc
I would like to start playing by ear and through regular notes and I figure the best way would be to know all the notes on the fretboard. Besides just constant practice, is there some exercise or tool I can use to help me memorize and quickly recall the note my finger is pressed on?

Thanks.

PM Andy_Mclaughlin he has put up a new vid.
#6
The thing you need is to learn major scales on fret board. And while doing that, loudly say the name of note you play. Lets say, learn all major scales places on fretboard of one note every week. Once you finish majors, start reading notes, solmization etc. Then finally comes minor scales, this would take 3 months or more, but just then you will be a lot better, you ears will be awesome, you wouldn't need tabs, also your talent will be enhanced with practise. So then you can start playing by ear. But do not forget one thing, which is the key,


LOUDLY SAY THE NAME OF NOTE YOU PLAY! This is key to everything.
Also add sharp/ flat to this. And, also ask your teacher about installation of chords.
#7
Quote by cemges
The thing you need is to learn major scales on fret board. And while doing that, loudly say the name of note you play. Lets say, learn all major scales places on fretboard of one note every week. Once you finish majors, start reading notes, solmization etc. Then finally comes minor scales, this would take 3 months or more, but just then you will be a lot better, you ears will be awesome, you wouldn't need tabs, also your talent will be enhanced with practise. So then you can start playing by ear. But do not forget one thing, which is the key,


LOUDLY SAY THE NAME OF NOTE YOU PLAY! This is key to everything.
Also add sharp/ flat to this. And, also ask your teacher about installation of chords.



++1 it helps to yell out the name of the note while playing different scales. I am not yet proficient with the notes either, takes me about half a sec to come up with the note but this is what i've been doing lately and its helping alot.
#8
you can do what GEE told you, calculating through octaves is definitely the easiest way.

You can also

- take a piece of paper
- start writing the notes on a piece of paper
- write it 3 times
- one time without sharps and flats
-one time with sharps
- one time with flats

Another thing you can do is just pick a random note and find it on all 6 strings up and down

I wrote 2 exercises in my FREE ebook, you may check it out if you want to .

But if you ask me it is more important to learn to actually learn to sing the notes rather then just to know them
#9
Quote by etcetc
I would like to start playing by ear and through regular notes and I figure the best way would be to know all the notes on the fretboard. Besides just constant practice, is there some exercise or tool I can use to help me memorize and quickly recall the note my finger is pressed on?

Thanks.

Learning the notes on the fretboard is important, but they won't be much use to you if you don't understand how to use them, in terms of intervals and chord construction.

Either way, this diagram will help in the future.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1485369
#10
If you yell out the notes...you'll freak your neighbours out.

I find http://www.musictheory.net/exercises to be pretty good. There is a fretboard identification (amongst other things), and you can customize it. So if you're working on just the first five frets, you can set the exercise so that it just does that, and not go all the way up. Makes it that much approachable, I think.

On an irrelevant note, the website I just linked also is a pretty good source for music theory. It's in no way comprehensive, but I think it's a great place to get started. It also has some interesting insights, such as using a mathematical approach to remembering key signatures.
#11
If you have a smartphone, theres many apps for it, this is especially cool since you can do it while away from your guitar.
#12
hey you don't have to yell, just saying it would do it. But don't tell them from inside our mind.
#13
Just learn your alphabet and which notes fall on the landmarks. After that, know where to find octaves/the same note on the other strings and you should know roughly every note. Octave stuff is simple if you know how to build a power chord, which mot of us do.
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#14
Start by playing C on the 6th string (8th fret) then on the 5th string (3rd fret) then on 4th string (10th fret) and so on up to the 1st string and back down to the 6th. Then go on to the next note (F) and do the same thing.

Rules
1. Don’t play any notes open
2. Use the same finger to play all the notes.
3. Do it with a metronome.
4. Slowly build up the speed.
5. Suggested order: C, G, D, A, E, B, F

A good starting speed would be 40-60 bpm (one note per click), and a target speed would be 160 bpm.

Be careful to follow the rules closely so you spend your time learning the best way that you can.

As well as learning the notes it will help you jump around the fingerboard. Hint: use the dots, they can really help.
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