#1
hello!

I'm not the most knowledgeable about keys and all of that stuff, so I have a question that will greatly help me out if answered.

I'm playing in Cminor. I'm at the point where I'm putting lead to the song. I have the notes C, G#, Eb, Bb and G in the piece. Hoping that I still remember my minor scale correctly these notes are all in Cm. So with that being said, irrespective of where I play these notes on the neck I will still be in key, right?

The thing is, I'm playing from the 16th fret which to me is G# land. & I've noticed that all the notes above are in G# major too.

Soooo.. do I get to pick what key I'm in?

I hope someone can see my problem. Any helpful advice would be welcome as it will help me in the long run. Thanks very much guys.

- Gee.
#2
Thanks, bro! I'll be sure to check it out after I cut my wrists and drink orphan tears.
#3
Quote by Geeee
hello!

I'm not the most knowledgeable about keys and all of that stuff, so I have a question that will greatly help me out if answered.

I'm playing in Cminor. I'm at the point where I'm putting lead to the song. I have the notes C, G#, Eb, Bb and G in the piece. Hoping that I still remember my minor scale correctly these notes are all in Cm. So with that being said, irrespective of where I play these notes on the neck I will still be in key, right?


If you play those notes (Ab not G# just so you know, unless you want it to function differently) then yes, you'll be in key.

However, you have to take into account what progression you have, or more specifically how your hamony works; you can't just play any of those notes in any harmonic combination and expect it to sound like you want.

The thing is, I'm playing from the 16th fret which to me is G# land. & I've noticed that all the notes above are in G# major too.

Soooo.. do I get to pick what key I'm in?

I hope someone can see my problem. Any helpful advice would be welcome as it will help me in the long run. Thanks very much guys.

- Gee.


What is G# land?


The key you pick is defined by who each note functions in terms of it. Or if you want to know which key you are in, you have to find what notes fulfill the function of dominant, subdominant and tonic (and their substitutes which have the same function).
How do you know what "function" is? Is basicly tension and resolution in different quantities.
The tonic is the resolution note, it's what your key is "in".
The dominant is the note that produces tension and tends to resolve to the tonic.
The subdominant also tends to resolve to the tonic, but not that much and is considered more of a "preparation" or intermediate function.

So if you find out which notes are these, you find out your key (if you are playing in one).
#4
Quote by gonzaw
If you play those notes (Ab not G# just so you know, unless you want it to function differently) then yes, you'll be in key.

However, you have to take into account what progression you have, or more specifically how your hamony works; you can't just play any of those notes in any harmonic combination and expect it to sound like you want.


What is G# land?


The key you pick is defined by who each note functions in terms of it. Or if you want to know which key you are in, you have to find what notes fulfill the function of dominant, subdominant and tonic (and their substitutes which have the same function).
How do you know what "function" is? Is basicly tension and resolution in different quantities.
The tonic is the resolution note, it's what your key is "in".
The dominant is the note that produces tension and tends to resolve to the tonic.
The subdominant also tends to resolve to the tonic, but not that much and is considered more of a "preparation" or intermediate function.

So if you find out which notes are these, you find out your key (if you are playing in one).


Isn't G# the same thing as Ab? The notes listed aren't in order, I'm not going from C to G#/Ab.

G# (or any note) land is a reference to the root note of a scale. ie:16th fret of the e is G# so it's where a scale in G# would begin to me. I'm not long out of the "scale boxes" so please, be easy lol.. you've said alot of stuff that is new to me there man so i'll have a looksie and try to get my head around it.


I'll just say this. so can those notes can work with Cm? regardless of where they are on the neck?

ill tab it.


e 20-16 20-16-18-16 20-16
b 16 16 18

if thats any help. maybe you can see why i consider it g# land.


thanks for the reply.
#5
Quote by Geeee
Isn't G# the same thing as Ab? The notes listed aren't in order, I'm not going from C to G#/Ab.

G# (or any note) land is a reference to the root note of a scale. ie:16th fret of the e is G# so it's where a scale in G# would begin to me. I'm not long out of the "scale boxes" so please, be easy lol.. you've said alot of stuff that is new to me there man so i'll have a looksie and try to get my head around it.


I'll just say this. so can those notes can work with Cm? regardless of where they are on the neck?

ill tab it.


e 20-16 20-16-18-16 20-16
b 16 16 18

if thats any help. maybe you can see why i consider it g# land.


thanks for the reply.



For one, Ab major and C minor don't share the same notes.

Yes, the pitches of the notes Ab and G# are the same, but the notes are not the same; namely one has the degree A and the other G.
They also form different intervals.
In C minor, a G# represents an augmented 5th, while an Ab represents a minor 6th. Those 2 intervals are used differently in different chords (for instance), and they work differently too.
#6
Quote by gonzaw
For one, Ab major and C minor don't share the same notes.

Yes, the pitches of the notes Ab and G# are the same, but the notes are not the same; namely one has the degree A and the other G.
They also form different intervals.
In C minor, a G# represents an augmented 5th, while an Ab represents a minor 6th. Those 2 intervals are used differently in different chords (for instance), and they work differently too.


lol.

That's.. interesting. Thanks for the help, but I'm not familiar with all the terminology you're using. I'm a casual player, I play for fun. I don't study it. The notes I listed earlier are in both G#/Ab and Cm. I just wanted to know that if I played these notes elsewhere on the neck (out of the main boxed position) would they still be considered to be in Cm. It's something that would help me tremendously throughout all of my days of playing. If anything I'm more confused now than before. Thanks for the time, though.
#7
Quote by Geeee
lol.

That's.. interesting. Thanks for the help, but I'm not familiar with all the terminology you're using. I'm a casual player, I play for fun. I don't study it. The notes I listed earlier are in both G#/Ab and Cm. I just wanted to know that if I played these notes elsewhere on the neck (out of the main boxed position) would they still be considered to be in Cm. It's something that would help me tremendously throughout all of my days of playing. If anything I'm more confused now than before. Thanks for the time, though.



As long as you're playing those notes in those scales it'll be in key.

Playing the same notes higher or lower won't change anything.
BLANKBLANK
#9
Technically, that G# is actually Ab...

EDIT: Didn't read all the posts...
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