#1
Hello! I am wodering that the best way is to get out of the box shaped blues based solos and start moving across the fretboard and thus greating new melodys and licks.
Any tips, help out there?
#3
Well all scales connect across the fretboard, so learn how to play a scale and its modes across the fretboard. To do this, one must learn the modes first, though. And almost everything you can do outside a box can be done in a box, from my experience.
#5
Quote by RocknRoll7425
Hello! I am wodering that the best way is to get out of the box shaped blues based solos and start moving across the fretboard and thus greating new melodys and licks.
Any tips, help out there?


Well, box shaped based solos, blues solos, and moving across the fret-board are 3 issues, I would suggest dealing with them as such...

1) learn the Major and minor scales. Learn melodies and solos that utilize them

2) Learn solos from non-blues based music.

3) Learn solos that utilize more than one position on the guitar.

Learn and memorize the music. Play the hell out of it, and study it. (find out what key it's in, what scale it's using....ect).

Don't worry about "getting out" of anything, but rather just "get into" more things. When it comes to skills and knowledge on the guitar, you want to expand, not throw things away. The "dude those are only box shapes" attitude misses the point.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Oct 9, 2011,
#7
Quote by RocknRoll7425
Hello! I am wodering that the best way is to get out of the box shaped blues based solos and start moving across the fretboard and thus greating new melodys and licks.
Any tips, help out there?


Work on your ear.

Get to point where you're thinking in terms of SOUNDS, not SHAPES. You should be able to sing any lick before you play it.
#8
^ I always found that learning the shapes helps a persons hearing because it gives them something to associate the sounds with. For instance, after practicing the C major scale I can picture it's shape on the fret-board as well as imagine how it sounds.
shred is gaudy music
#9
If your just playing the blues try the same box but at a different root note, try starting on a different scale note, and add some slides. Just keep trying.
#10
just pick a random song, then choose ur scale (not the key, play to find that), then improv, play your mistakes until they sound good, learning to play your mistakes makes u much better, oh yea and dont stop playing when ya hit the wrong note. always keep pushing urself ferther, experiment with new ways to bend flick and tap on the string.
Last edited by j6ibs at Oct 10, 2011,
#11
Quote by RocknRoll7425
Hello! I am wodering that the best way is to get out of the box shaped blues based solos and start moving across the fretboard and thus greating new melodys and licks.
Any tips, help out there?

Try playing/thinking laterally rather than vertically.
Last edited by mdc at Oct 10, 2011,
#12
Quote by GuitarMunky
^ I always found that learning the shapes helps a persons hearing because it gives them something to associate the sounds with. For instance, after practicing the C major scale I can picture it's shape on the fret-board as well as imagine how it sounds.


Sure. I don't think these things are completely unconnected.

But doing ear-specific work helps someone to think in terms of sounds. Since he knows one box pattern, it's time to stop thinking in patterns for a while and to focus on sounds.
#13
Joe Satriani says to learn scales on each string, one at a time [e.g. Am on A string = 0 2 3 5 7 8 10 12 etc]
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#14
Quote by HotspurJr
Sure. I don't think these things are completely unconnected.

But doing ear-specific work helps someone to think in terms of sounds. Since he knows one box pattern, it's time to stop thinking in patterns for a while and to focus on sounds.


I would say that rather than it being time to "stop thinking in patterns", it's time to start "listening to what those patterns sound like". The visual pattern we see on the guitar represents what we are hearing aurally. Put the 2 together and you're in business.
shred is gaudy music
#16
Quote by GuitarMunky
I would say that rather than it being time to "stop thinking in patterns", it's time to start "listening to what those patterns sound like". The visual pattern we see on the guitar represents what we are hearing aurally. Put the 2 together and you're in business.


That's a very interesting point to bring up, especially so when you consider that some people are more apt to learning visually, whilst some are more aural. I'm all for it, moreso than the "ignore patterns" advice that usually comes along.
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