#1
Hey everyone,

I was considering doing a 50's wiring mod on my PRS tremonti SE. I thought I would get some feedback on the mod first before I attempt it. I just wanted to know people opinions on it (Pros/cons/gripes).

If anyone has this mod can you tell me how it affects your volume swells, if it does?

Thanks!
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#4
Prolly nothing, all you're doing is changing the direction of the flow through your pots, they still function exactly the same. Anyone who says they actually notice a difference is a flat out liar. It's usually associated as a mental thing. The only way to change your treble bleed rate is to change your cap value, how you wire it has nothing to do with it.

Or something...idk, it's wayyy to late for me.
#5
I did it to my les paul and it made rolling off the volume way less muddy than it used to be. Probably the best 30 minutes of modding i've done to my guitar.
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Gold jacket, green jacket, who gives a shit?

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#6
King Baby duck, did it affect your ability to do volume swells on the guitar at all?
Good dealings with:
Vash_08
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creativlogic
#8
Quote by ethan_hanus
What are you talking about? PRS wasn't even around in the 50's. Link the mod, cause I doubt anyone knows what it is.

Gibson was, and I hear they used pots and capacitors to modify the tone of their guitars. No reason a PRS can't use the same wiring setup.
Quote by ethan_hanus
Prolly nothing, all you're doing is changing the direction of the flow through your pots, they still function exactly the same. Anyone who says they actually notice a difference is a flat out liar. It's usually associated as a mental thing. The only way to change your treble bleed rate is to change your cap value, how you wire it has nothing to do with it.

Or something...idk, it's wayyy to late for me.

It doesn't function exactly the same. You're filtering after the volume pot instead of before it. As with a lot of things involved with the signal path, order matters. 0 for 2, Ethan.

I did this on my Les Paul - the difference is not huge, but it does seem to make the tone controls more usable. What (I think) happens is, since you're changing the tone at the last possible stage before the cable, the tone controls don't have to deal with the admittedly minor interference from the volume pots, so they have a more predictable and smooth sweep. The more important change to me was that there's a lot less interaction between volume and tone pots, so you can alter the volume without it messing with the tone as much (this is probably the clarity effect the other poster mentioned) - basically, it reduces a lot of muddiness when you have the volume knob down. Adding treble bleed caps can further affect this balance, if you wish.

As for volume swells - some people say it makes volume swells stand out more. I haven't noticed that. If the effect exists, I'd say it's because there's more clarity with the volume knob way down, so that you can hear that note better and it doesn't get lost.

Basically -
If you want to do the mod, go for it. It costs nothing to do, and the worst that happens is you don't hear a difference. If you're the sort of person who doesn't have all the knobs parked at 10 all the time, chances are you're going to notice some improvement.
#9
I use my controls quite a bit, often adjusting them between passages or on the fly. I done the 50's wiring mod to my Flying V (2 volume 1 tone) when I had it apart last since it's become my workhorse, and I believe it was well worth the 5 minutes of time it took to do. The effect isn't as noticeable on the bridge pickup (Gibson 500T), however on the neck (SD '59) it made a big difference. The volume and tone control function more independently of each other and it actually makes the tone knob useful below 4 without getting muddy.

I'm not really sure why the 500T doesn't respond like the '59, maybe it's the difference in output. I don't have the best ears in the world and I'm not a tone freak by any means, but the effect is definitely there. If you actually use your controls you'll notice the difference, if you keep them all at 10 then it's not worth your time.

Also, this is the best explanation I've found for what's going on. Taken from http://www.dominocs.com/AshBassGuitar/Gibson50s.html
Stock: the tone cap is connected to the pickup itself before the output of the pickup passes through the volume pot. This means that the treble loss associated with the tone control is taken from the FULL OUTPUT of the pickup.

50's Wiring: the tone cap is connected to the output of the volume pot and the treble loss associated with the tone control is taken AFTER THE VOLUME POT has altered the output of the pickup.

So if we pick some arbitrary (and incorrect!) numbers just to paint a picture:
Before the volume control the pickup is at 100% output
After the volume control the pickup is at 90% output.
The tone control, even when on "10", reduces the treble by 5%.

So -5% of 90% output is less than -5% of 100% output.
That's one reason this mod works and seems to retain the treble.



EDIT: I also done this simple mod to my V, if it tells you how much I like the controls. Position indicators! These should be stock on every guitar

Endorsed by Dean Guitars 07-10
2003 Gibson Flying V w/ Moon Inlay
2006 Fender All-American Partscaster
SVK ELP-C500 Custom

1964 Fender Vibro Champ
1989 Peavey VTM60

[thread="1166208"]Gibsons Historic Designs[/thread]
Last edited by Flux'D at Oct 10, 2011,
#10
I do this to all my guitars.
I highly suggest it.
You WILL notice a difference, a difference in fact that I don't know why guitars come stock with it, it makes the volume and tone controls more responsive with each other.
You won't regret it, and if you do, then you can always change it back.
Cusp of Magic
#11
Thank you everyone! I appreciate the help and feedback!
Good dealings with:
Vash_08
Madsjc
jdr94
Delanoir
creativlogic