#1
Yes, I saw the other thread but this is different. I also searchbarred and found nothing.

I am giving math rock a crack. However, the song I am writing has a tempo change: I tried several different methods on a simulator such as using double time, but that's too fast. I am going from 200bpm in 4/4 to 145bpm in 9/8. While it's fine if I can play along with the program, playing it with drums and a bass player would be somewhat problematic. The aforementioned is the only way I can figure to make it work with the program, but I doubt this is accurate.

So, my question is this: first of all, am I looking at the tempos and denominators wrong (I am not good with this sort of thing: I'm good with time signatures, but not tempos in this instance), or is what I'm trying to do simply not feasible? How I play it feels comfortable, but I'm pretty sure I'm going about this the wrong way. I usually only pay attention to the numerator, as I'm not great with the denominator and don't fully understand it.

tl;dr changing tempos with non equal divisions... is it possible or even used much/at all?

Thanks for any help you can give me
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Last edited by Banjocal at Oct 10, 2011,
#2
Even if the tempo change is intended to feel jarring to pull listeners in it needs to feel natural to the musicians or else you're just gonna have 3+ people on stage taking a wild stab at a new tempo and most likely failing. Is it absolutely necessary to from a solid 200 bpm to exactly 145?

There's no real trick for uneven changes like that. Either the guys you're playing with "feel it" or they don't.
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#3
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There's no real trick for uneven changes like that. Either the guys you're playing with "feel it" or they don't.


This, I'm sure most players would be able to get it regardless after you rehearsed it a few times anyway.

#4
Well, if it is just a case of feeling it, then that's not a problem: it flows quite smoothly (I didn't notice it myself till I started to analyze it) and the time signature changes do too. I doubt someone would have any issues playing with it or adapting to it. As for precision, it could be played maybe 5bpm give or take, but I have sort of "narrowed it down" to those by messing with the bpm's in the program, and those are what I'm playing in.

Thanks for the info guys. I usually try to count time signatures/tempos when composing. usually have no problem with it, but my issue here was that I couldn't, and it threw me off

many thanks
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
Last edited by Banjocal at Oct 10, 2011,
#5
I, personally, say that you should look at a time signature as a whole and how it feels rather than the numbers that really go into it. thats how I think when I conduct an ensemble any way...