#1
So my dads a Painting/Drywalling contractor, and I've been unofficially working with him for about a month.
Already, I'm starting to die physically; my (already) bad back is aching, my hands ache to the point of no guitar, and a powerdrill fell off a ladder and hit me in the face at
#2
I start a job in construction next week. I predict pain and misery as well, but it pays good.
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#4
def. didn't finish the thread, lol my bad.

Yeah its rough; def. pays good ( about $10/hr) I'm just wanting to see if anyone else is as miserable as me. My dads been doing this 20 years... have no idea how hes lasted this long lol
#7
Quote by turn_the_page93
def. didn't finish the thread, lol my bad.

Yeah its rough; def. pays good ( about $10/hr) I'm just wanting to see if anyone else is as miserable as me. My dads been doing this 20 years... have no idea how hes lasted this long lol

that's probably like asking someone how they still play guitar after playing for a week.
except not really
#8
Its easy to say man up when you're not the one doing it lol.

But really, this is the only job I can get at the moment. Kinda sucks, but its whatever; itll work until I become a rockstar
#9
Quote by turn_the_page93
Kinda sucks, but its whatever; itll work until I become a rockstar


Hope you get the knack for dry wall. It's gonna be a long 20 years.
#10
I've done drywalling, electrical work, renovating in general and yes it's hard the guys above me are right, man up. You've only been at it a month, you'll get used to it. It was tough as hell when I was doing it a few years back but after a few months it was nothing. Keep at it.
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#11
More painting, less drywalling? My dad owns a construction company (which I currently work for). He started out doing drywall, and yeah, it's definitely some hard work. It sucks, but hard work can always build character, too, along with paychecks. But anyways, he's told me how drywallers tend to have a good work ethic, but painters on the other hand are probably doing the (relatively) easiest part of construction, at least in the specific kind of construction he does (not so much ground-up work). Painters have one of the less physically demanding aspects of construction, and my dad says that painters are the ones most likely to be lazier and harder to deal with.

EDIT: Construction is a great place to work your way up, too. If you're very good at your job however. My dad is probably the most successful person I'll ever know in my life without a high school diploma.
Last edited by The Madcap at Oct 10, 2011,
#13
Try doing flat roofing in the burning hot sun, and for shit pay at that. Glad I quit.
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#14
Quote by The Madcap
More painting, less drywalling? My dad owns a construction company (which I currently work for). He started out doing drywall, and yeah, it's definitely some hard work. It sucks, but hard work can always build character, too, along with paychecks. But anyways, he's told me how drywallers tend to have a good work ethic, but painters on the other hand are probably doing the (relatively) easiest part of construction, at least in the specific kind of construction he does (not so much ground-up work). Painters have one of the less physically demanding aspects of construction, and my dad says that painters are the ones most likely to be lazier and harder to deal with.


I wouldn't want to paint for a living though, it's fucking boring.
#15
Quote by turn_the_page93
Its easy to say man up when you're not the one doing it lol.

But really, this is the only job I can get at the moment. Kinda sucks, but its whatever; itll work until I become a rockstar


And now we crush your dreams.
dirtbag ballet by the bins down the alley
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everything that you've come to expect


#16
try doing a little light stretching before you get started. it'll help with the soreness.
#17
Quote by rich1981
try doing a little light stretching before you get started. it'll help with the soreness.

+1 I work a physical labor job and this really helps.

Also just keep going at it, $10/hour isn't bad at all and after awhile of doing it your body will get used to it. As someone else said before it really builds character.
In my heart I'm with you

every night
#18
Quote by The Madcap
More painting, less drywalling? My dad owns a construction company (which I currently work for). He started out doing drywall, and yeah, it's definitely some hard work. It sucks, but hard work can always build character, too, along with paychecks. But anyways, he's told me how drywallers tend to have a good work ethic, but painters on the other hand are probably doing the (relatively) easiest part of construction, at least in the specific kind of construction he does (not so much ground-up work). Painters have one of the less physically demanding aspects of construction, and my dad says that painters are the ones most likely to be lazier and harder to deal with.

EDIT: Construction is a great place to work your way up, too. If you're very good at your job however. My dad is probably the most successful person I'll ever know in my life without a high school diploma.


Same, my dad makes over $120k a year and only has a high school diploma...but that was back in the day when nobody cared, if you could do the job well, you're hired, but now you have to have a college education to even be considered for most higher end jobs. Nobody is willing to take the risk to train someone up from the ground up, no, they have to already have a diploma in it saying that they might know a thing or two.

Construction is a good job, it'll get easier the longer you do it. It's not for the faint of heart either, so man up, or quit.
#19
I've been doing it with my dad about since I could walk, full time in the summers and full time year round as of maybe a month ago. You get used to the soreness and all that. The biggest job I've helped on, I did mostly framing and roofing, and a LOT of digging for the foundations of some additions we built...weeks of digging haha. Anyway man you get used to it, and you won't need to exercise much if you just work hard, and it's good money especially once you've got some specialized skills. Keep at it.
#20
Quote by rich1981
try doing a little light stretching before you get started. it'll help with the soreness.

Good thinking..
Last edited by BRIAN1986 at Oct 11, 2011,
#21
Quote by turn_the_page93
So my dads a Painting/Drywalling contractor, and I've been unofficially working with him for about a month.
Already, I'm starting to die physically; my (already) bad back is aching, my hands ache to the point of no guitar, and a powerdrill fell off a ladder and hit me in the face at
When you've been doing it for about 6 months, your hands will have toughened up (good for guitar playing) and so will your back (good for high energy performing on stage for a few hours with a guitar strapped to you)

You'll also be more aware of the dangers surrounding you in a workplace and be more careful. (good for avoiding tripping up over guitar leads while on stage)

The paycheque is also good for buying guitars, guitar straps, leads, strings, picks, amps, ect.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Oct 11, 2011,
#22
I remember to help out the construction company my mum works for, she asked me to do some manual work for them, I used to work in the office which was boring as **** but really easy then they took me out to a job and it was fucking hard waking up at 5:30 every morning, hard work gets easier if you know what you're doing so you don't get aches all the time.

I remember carrying timber the first few times hurt but after a while you feel how to carry it better then you can stack 3 or 4 planks on later on and get it done quicker.
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Last edited by Teh Traineez0rz at Oct 11, 2011,
#23
You think Benjamin Franklin complained when the British killed his wife? He didn't give a rat's ass. I think you can deal with some hand pains, Nancy.
Quote by Gabel
You are EXTREMELY WRONG! I have played it. I own an 18W and it would be an awful stereo amp, it's way too bright, breaks up too easily and so on. Secondly, why would a guitar store sell an hifi amp.
#24
Quote by ripple07
You think Benjamin Franklin complained when the British killed his wife? He didn't give a rat's ass.




He even held their little red coats for them while they killed her.
#25
Quote by ripple07
You think Benjamin Franklin complained when the British killed his wife? He didn't give a rat's ass. I think you can deal with some hand pains, Nancy.


I think you might complain when I kill your wife. But only to start with. Once you realise I am a better wife for you, you will learn to deal with the pain.

Last edited by devourke at Oct 11, 2011,
#26
I like what your selling, sonny boy.

Quote by SlackerBabbath


He even held their little red coats for them while they killed her.

Once a gentleman, always a gentleman
Quote by Gabel
You are EXTREMELY WRONG! I have played it. I own an 18W and it would be an awful stereo amp, it's way too bright, breaks up too easily and so on. Secondly, why would a guitar store sell an hifi amp.
Last edited by ripple07 at Oct 11, 2011,
#27
Quote by turn_the_page93
and a powerdrill fell off a ladder and hit me in the face at



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i went to the pub. the look on the bartenders faces when they realised theyd been serving me alcohol illegally for the past two years was priceless.

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DoGaLog, i think youv jst owned everyone on this thread and well done.
#28
Am I a bad person because i laughed when i read that the powerdrill hit you in the face?
#29
Quote by turn_the_page93
and a powerdrill fell off a ladder and hit me in the face at


LOL but Can you finish this sentence please?
#30
I worked for my dad for three straight months at the start of the year (every day for 8-12 hours, 5am starts). He's in the general construction business, a freelance builder/cementer/carpenter, etc. Hardest work I've ever done in my life. After three months, I seriously couldn't cut it any longer, my body actually gave up on me. Good luck, TS. Hopefully you'll do better than me.

Quote by The Madcap
My dad is probably the most successful person I'll ever know in my life without a high school diploma.


Ditto. Dad earns a shitload of cash, but it comes at a real cost. He's ALWAYS at work, so I rarely get to spend time with him, and he works very, very hard. Of all the ways I HAVE taken after my father, his work ethic is something I wish I had acquired.
Last edited by 'Leviathan' at Oct 11, 2011,