#1
I've started recording at my house but I don't have a space for drums, so I've been writing drum tracks in Guitar Pro 5 and then exporting them to Sony Acid and recording my guitar.

The problem is I don't like the sound from GP5. I've fiddled around with Addictive Drums using Ableton Live and I can't get the hang of writing the drum parts with a piano roll.

Does anyone out there know of a program or software that I can use to write a drum track for a whole song and not use premade loops??


Thanks!

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#2
I';m a huge fan of Addictive Drums
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#3
Is there maybe a different DAW I can use that would have an easier drum writing interface? I'm sort of lost here.
#4
I've heard Drum kit from Hell is pretty good.
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#8
Just a tip, I find writing the drums in Guitar Pro a lot easier than using the piano roll or sequencers as well.

What I do is write out drum parts in Guitar Pro then export that to a midi and import it into a DAW with Addictive Drums. From there if you have the latest version of Addictive Drums you can set the mapping to a GM Map and it will play your Guitar Pro file without having to edit the mapping. If you don't have the latest AD you have to adjust your midi keys to the right sound (snare, toms, hihats, cymbals, etc.)

The cool thing about writing in Guitar Pro is it's just really easy to manage all your time signature changes and easier on the eyes. Plus I usually start out jotting down the things I write in Guitar Pro to begin with anyway.

I like the sounds from Addictive Drums for the most part but I'm still not happy with the toms it has.

Anyway good luck!
#9
I always use Rhythm Rascal. It doesn't have very good sounding drums, but it has a very simple layout that is easy to get used to. It's free, and you can export your projects to midi with no problem at all. Just ignore it when it says to register, there's no point.
#10
Quote by SideEffect
Just a tip, I find writing the drums in Guitar Pro a lot easier than using the piano roll or sequencers as well.

What I do is write out drum parts in Guitar Pro then export that to a midi and import it into a DAW with Addictive Drums. From there if you have the latest version of Addictive Drums you can set the mapping to a GM Map and it will play your Guitar Pro file without having to edit the mapping. If you don't have the latest AD you have to adjust your midi keys to the right sound (snare, toms, hihats, cymbals, etc.)


+1 to this. Addictive is the most natural sounding drums I've found so far, as it automatically puts in a lot of the nuances other programs require you to program in (velocity layering, random sampling), and with the adpaks I find I have more than enough choices in terms of sounds (still need to find the jazz brushes though). The expanded MIDI mapping takes some getting used to, but its nice to have the extra control over the snare and hi-hat.
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#11
What kind of music are you writing?

You could always go the free route like ethan has mentioned, by using a sequencer and free drum samples you find online (there are A LOT of great ones out there). If you're looking for a paid program, you're not going to find anything better than Steven Slate Drums EX for under $200. Not to mention, the samples in SSD are already pre-mixed, so if you're not very good at mixing, at least your drums will sound really good right off the bat, and with some minor tweaks, they can sound very professional. I'm honestly not a huge fan of Addictive Drums, and much prefer SSD and Superior 2.0, but they are twice the price of SSD EX, and if you're not in a huge hurry, you might be able to score EX on an AudioMIDI No-Brainer or off another site for $15 like I did
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#12
Quote by SideEffect
What I do is write out drum parts in Guitar Pro then export that to a midi and import it into a DAW with Addictive Drums.


I've been doing this for years, program in GP and import the MIDI into my DAW. I prefer EZ Drummer or BFD 1.5 for my sounds but the basic idea is the same. So MrGrimm101, you have all the tools at your disposal, you just have to use them properly. (Remember to remove the MIDI control data that GP tends to add and you'll be fine.)
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#13
Quote by ethan_hanus
DrumTrack, you can import your own sounds, and use it as a basic midi/self programmable drum machine...and it's free. It's very easy to use, just hard to get a humanistic sound out of it.


this.download some good samples and fiddle around with it and its great.it does take tinkering to get a good human sound but it is possible
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#14
Quote by ebon00
I've been doing this for years, program in GP and import the MIDI into my DAW. I prefer EZ Drummer or BFD 1.5 for my sounds but the basic idea is the same. So MrGrimm101, you have all the tools at your disposal, you just have to use them properly. (Remember to remove the MIDI control data that GP tends to add and you'll be fine.)

Yeah, I used to use GP for writing drums, but now I find it's much easier to use the MIDI editor in Reaper. You will get more comfortable with writing in your DAW as you get more familiar with it, but GP is a great tool to start with.
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#15
Nothing beats Battery 3. I have tried many different things, but I don't think they touch the amount of things Battery 3 can do. If you want something cheap or a simple interface that doesn't have a bunch of customization options though its not for you. I think I got it for $150?

Great thing about it is its also a great sampler.
#16
- Write your drum track in Guitar Pro
- Export as a MIDI file
- Load the MIDI file into an Addictive Drums instrument track in your DAW software.
- Go to to the MAP window in Addictive and select the General MIDI preset (under 'GM').

It should now work perfectly! If it's too fast/slow, just change the tempo in your DAW to match the GP5 tempo you wrote it in.


NOTE: You MUST update Addictive Drums to 1.5 if you haven't already, or this won't work.


Also, if you're getting stuck with the Piano Roll, try loading a few grooves from Addictive into it first so you can examine how they're put together and use em as a base. Addictive is a great bit of software and anything else would be a step backwards!
#17
Quote by SideEffect
I like the sounds from Addictive Drums for the most part but I'm still not happy with the toms it has.

Pick up the Retro expansion! The cymbals and toms sound far better than the stock ones, even for modern sounding kits.
#18
Quote by kyle62
Pick up the Retro expansion! The cymbals and toms sound far better than the stock ones, even for modern sounding kits.


will do the cymbals have always bothered me without some eqing
#19
I disagree, writing drum tracks on the piano roll is way easier, and you can control the velocity and rhythms so much easier. I use Logic Pro and plug-in Superior Drummer and I could write a great drum track out in less than an hour for a song. And the great thing about SD is that it mixes up the samples so even if it's all the same velocity it sounds real-er anyway, but I always use the "humanize" function in Logic that gives it that extra feel.