#1
What are falsetto and false chords? I am new to singing. Is there any more terms/words I should know?


Thanks,
#2
I don't want to explain Falsetto cuz I don't know in depth besides that it is your "Head voice". But False Chord is a type of screaming vocal technique employed generally by death metal and other types of extreme metal. Considered one of the two "Correct" ways to scream besides Fry Vocals. I use False Chord for vocals myself.

Edit: Also, the False Chord is specifically a fold of flesh above the normal vocal chords. Some speculate that it evolved as a way to scare off predatory animals in primitive man, explaining why using it generally sounds like a growl. If it is surgically removed it will grow back in full.
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Last edited by VikingBradlev at Oct 11, 2011,
#3
I don't want to explain Falsetto cuz I don't know in depth besides that it is your "Head voice"


I totally don't mean this in a rude way, but you're right to not explain it because that isn't really what it is.

Falsetto is anytime you take a "fake" voice to hit a note. Be it trying to sound like a man to reach a low note (as I would have to) or sounding like a chipmunk to hit a high note.

It is what it says it is: False.
#4
Quote by Anexa
I totally don't mean this in a rude way, but you're right to not explain it because that isn't really what it is.

Falsetto is anytime you take a "fake" voice to hit a note. Be it trying to sound like a man to reach a low note (as I would have to) or sounding like a chipmunk to hit a high note.

It is what it says it is: False.


No offense taken. Exactly why I didn't try haha
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#6
Falsetto is a function of the vocal chords where they shorten to half their length, so only half your vocal chords are vibrating instead of the whole length.
#7
Quote by Anexa
I totally don't mean this in a rude way, but you're right to not explain it because that isn't really what it is.

Falsetto is anytime you take a "fake" voice to hit a note. Be it trying to sound like a man to reach a low note (as I would have to) or sounding like a chipmunk to hit a high note.

It is what it says it is: False.


wtf are you talking about? it is NOT trying to sound like man to reach a low note. you're far off. I wonder where some of you get their shit from?

falsetto is the vocal register just above the modal voice register like one octave above.

Females who do it alot? Think Mariah Carey, Leona Lewis, Whitney Houston.

Males who do it alot? Think Bee Gees
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#8
wtf are you talking about? it is NOT trying to sound like man to reach a low note. you're far off. I wonder where some of you get their shit from?


Um when I try to sound like a man to hit a low note, it isn't my real voice is my point. I was trying to explain that any fake voice we take isn't really our register.

That is "WTF I'm talkin' bout". Your choice of vocabulary doesn't make for the desire to have a civilized conversation about the topic, or that I MAY be a little incorrect in what I said.. but it is DEFINITELY not "head voice" only was my point (the term head voice is really misused).

I can go pretty high, D6 is the end of my range.. so I can't relate to what my "High" falsetto sounds like because by that point I believe it becomes more of a "whistle register" thing... which is also not really counted in our range and what you are probably referring to by mentioning Mariah Carey, Whitnet Houston and this other singer I don't know.

I'm all for being corrected if I am incorrect (which I believe your nearly copy/pasted definition from wikipedia is more correct), however I don't appreciate your choice of wording that looks to discredit you before even looking into the essence of your post.
#9
don't be so touchy, it's the internet. a place for trolls and insecure teenagers acting cool on forums.

The fact that falsetto derives from the word false, does Not mean every "fake" voice you make is a falsetto.

Here's the difference between the falsetto and the whistle register:

Falsetto: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GcWl3KIPO0 check out 1:20 for example

Whistle: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wS3cgGKDC6Y

Oh I got my definition from wiki alright, I wanted to make absolutely sure my reply wouldn't be coming out of my ass. I'm always open to corrections as well. I've been wrong twice before after all.
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#10
They are apart of your voice. But when you stop singing normal your true cords stop only your false vocal chords are vibrating.

I dont believe they vibrate the same, They are smaller and not the same as your vocal chords. But are somehow connected.

go look up mouth or vocal chord anatomy and youll see right where they are compared to your true vocal chords. or vocal folds.

Nothing about your voice seem "fake" to me. False fits the term much better
#11
False chords would be what you use to sing with grit, or to do death growls and screams.

Falsetto is singing with a very thin tone, and it allows you to sing much higher than you normally would be able to. Think of when you fake a girls voice, basically, thats falsetto.


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#12
With modal register, the vocal chords zip up along their length, making a smaller area have to vibrate and thus vibrate quicker (IE. higher pitch) with the same energy. Of course, you can cheat and use wrong technique to go up in pitch in modal register as well.

Falsetto, as I have come to understand it, is when your vocal chords do not zip up, but are kept close to each other, and the outer edge vibrates rapidly. This does not allow for the same variation in sine waves (yes, sound is either with a pitch, AKA sine waves, or white noise, AKA random stuffsies) as modal register does, but creates a rather unique sound which is typically higher than the modal register.

Both can be trained so as to exert greater control of pitch, timbre, etc.
False vocal chords are mainly used in "harsh metal vocals", or when someone is attempting to sing clean and uses rather damaging technique. WOOH.

Some people call falsetto 'head voice' because falsetto sounds so negative. This, of course, just causes confusion in academic pursuits.

Sources: I IS A COUNTERTENOR.
Last edited by zeyth at Dec 8, 2011,
#13
The more you deny your falsetto, or as I prefer to call it, head voice, the less range you have.

Think of the voice as a violin with two strings, one thick and one thin. Whilst playing on the thick string, as your finger slides up the fingerboard, it raises the pitch but also increases the tension. Consequently, there is more stress upon the string. But you can play the higher pitch on the thinner string at a much lower tension, with less stress upon the string. Relating this back to singing, if you sing high pitches with chest voice, it is a lot harder work to sustain those pitches than if you sang it with head voice. But, of course, you are afraid of singing it in head voice because it sounds too wimpy. But what if I said you could strengthen the head voice to a point where it doesn't sound wimpy and still sounds like you? I would be intrigued, and hopefully you would too, because it means we don't have to work so damn hard in singing the higher pitches because we would be singing in a way that allows us to hit the pitches we want without having to strain. When an opera singer like Jussi Bjorling or Pavarotti sings a high C, it definitely isn't chest voice and you wouldn't say those Cs are wimpy or unmanly. Myles Kennedy also does a similar thing, but in a lighter way than the previously mentioned tenors. All three singers did an immense amount of work to get their voices to behave in that way so don't expect to achieve the results quickly. But what they did is repeatable, and it is all based on the fact that they incorporated the head voice as part of their whole voice, and didn't reject it because it sounded weak, wimpy and feminine at first. And if you copy what they did, you'll have at least an extra octave to add to your voice. But of course, this takes time.
#14
Quote by saichoo
The more you deny your falsetto, or as I prefer to call it, head voice, the less range you have.

Think of the voice as a violin with two strings, one thick and one thin. Whilst playing on the thick string, as your finger slides up the fingerboard, it raises the pitch but also increases the tension. Consequently, there is more stress upon the string. But you can play the higher pitch on the thinner string at a much lower tension, with less stress upon the string. Relating this back to singing, if you sing high pitches with chest voice, it is a lot harder work to sustain those pitches than if you sang it with head voice. But, of course, you are afraid of singing it in head voice because it sounds too wimpy. But what if I said you could strengthen the head voice to a point where it doesn't sound wimpy and still sounds like you? I would be intrigued, and hopefully you would too, because it means we don't have to work so damn hard in singing the higher pitches because we would be singing in a way that allows us to hit the pitches we want without having to strain. When an opera singer like Jussi Bjorling or Pavarotti sings a high C, it definitely isn't chest voice and you wouldn't say those Cs are wimpy or unmanly. Myles Kennedy also does a similar thing, but in a lighter way than the previously mentioned tenors. All three singers did an immense amount of work to get their voices to behave in that way so don't expect to achieve the results quickly. But what they did is repeatable, and it is all based on the fact that they incorporated the head voice as part of their whole voice, and didn't reject it because it sounded weak, wimpy and feminine at first. And if you copy what they did, you'll have at least an extra octave to add to your voice. But of course, this takes time.


Too bad falsetto and head voice are different things. Also, I am fairly certain those opera tenors are using modal registers, aka, chest voice and head voice. The difference between those two is merely how zipped-up the vocal chords are - after zipping up (and wanting to enter head voice, thus changing the position of certain soft tissue, surmisably) the sound waves will simply resonate in the head instead of the chest. Same vocal mechanism.

Gawd.
#15
Quote by saichoo
The more you deny your falsetto, or as I prefer to call it, head voice, the less range you have.

Think of the voice as a violin with two strings, one thick and one thin. Whilst playing on the thick string, as your finger slides up the fingerboard, it raises the pitch but also increases the tension. Consequently, there is more stress upon the string. But you can play the higher pitch on the thinner string at a much lower tension, with less stress upon the string. Relating this back to singing, if you sing high pitches with chest voice, it is a lot harder work to sustain those pitches than if you sang it with head voice. But, of course, you are afraid of singing it in head voice because it sounds too wimpy. But what if I said you could strengthen the head voice to a point where it doesn't sound wimpy and still sounds like you? I would be intrigued, and hopefully you would too, because it means we don't have to work so damn hard in singing the higher pitches because we would be singing in a way that allows us to hit the pitches we want without having to strain. When an opera singer like Jussi Bjorling or Pavarotti sings a high C, it definitely isn't chest voice and you wouldn't say those Cs are wimpy or unmanly. Myles Kennedy also does a similar thing, but in a lighter way than the previously mentioned tenors. All three singers did an immense amount of work to get their voices to behave in that way so don't expect to achieve the results quickly. But what they did is repeatable, and it is all based on the fact that they incorporated the head voice as part of their whole voice, and didn't reject it because it sounded weak, wimpy and feminine at first. And if you copy what they did, you'll have at least an extra octave to add to your voice. But of course, this takes time.


Pavarotti was a user of BelCanto, thats why he could effortlessly hit pitches.


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#16
Quote by zeyth
Too bad falsetto and head voice are different things. Also, I am fairly certain those opera tenors are using modal registers, aka, chest voice and head voice. The difference between those two is merely how zipped-up the vocal chords are - after zipping up (and wanting to enter head voice, thus changing the position of certain soft tissue, surmisably) the sound waves will simply resonate in the head instead of the chest. Same vocal mechanism.

Gawd.


Depends how you define it. We could be talking about exactly the same thing with different words. In this case, I was using falsetto as classical teachers use it, which essentially amounts to male head voice. But you also make the (important) distinction with how Singing Success use it - falsetto being a weak, breathy condition and head voice being the ideal condition.
#17
*sigh*

Quote by zeyth
Too bad falsetto and head voice are different things. Also, I am fairly certain those opera tenors are using modal registers, aka, chest voice and head voice.


This is correct.

Few men (roughly one in ten) can hit a tenor C. Obviously, even fewer can hit it in the way that Pavarotti or Bjorling did. (or Bruce Dickenson can....) They OWN that note rather than simply getting it and looking surprised - "Hey! i got it that time! And it was pretty good!"

This discussion is why I find the terms head voice and chest voice problematic. They suggest an exclusivity between the two, which leads people to assume that chest voice is akin to their "actual" voice (aka modal voice, mixed voice, etc.) and head voice is falsetto, which is incorrect.

Head voice and chest voice do not happen exclusively, just like in a speaker, woofers and tweeters do not sound exclusively. Lower notes have more chest resonance (more woofer) and higher notes have more head resonance (they engage the tweeter more), but they are never exclusive. Both will always be engaged - only the proportion changes.

I prefer to call the whole shooting match "full voice" or "natural voice" to avoid confusion.

What IS exclusive is the difference between your natural voice and falsetto.

Falsetto can add notes to your "vocal toolbox", so to speak, but those notes are not counted as being part of your range. In other words, to say that falsetto extends your range is technically wrong-headed.

The best analogy I can think of is this. Let's say you have a guitar with 24 frets. Your instrument has a range of 4 octaves, from E - E - E - E.

Is that to say that producing notes beyond that very high E are impossible? No. If I play harmonics, I can hit notes much higher than that. Is it fair to say that I have extended the range of my guitar because I can play harmonics? No.

Falsetto is just that - an artificial means of producing the voice. Directly translated, it means "small, false voice." Some people can get a very strong falsetto with practice (god knows, not me... but I don't practice that.), but it still equates to that sound that people put on when they are trying to impersonate elves or talking lady-bugs or chipmunks.

Good example.... Listen to Run to the Hills by Iron Maiden. In the chorus, Bruce Dickenson goes up to the tenor C and even the D above that (SOOOO rare for a man to just hammer that note the way he does in full voice), when he goes "run... for... your... li--i--ife." But at the *very* end of the song, he goes up even higher than that - to the G above tenor C - where he sings the final "life". THAT is falsetto. No man on the planet that I have heard - living or otherwise - can hit that note in anything but falsetto.

I pick that example because we're comparing the same singer in the same song, singing some very high notes in full voice, and then going into falsetto, so it is comparing apples to apples.

Alternately, listen to Alanis Morisette or the guy from Our Lady Peace when they do their "vocal gymnastics". They go in and out of falsetto within a lot of those phrases, and you can really hear the difference.

If you just want to hear falsetto - yeah, Bee Gees "Stayin' Alive" for the win. (though I love Ozzy's version of that song...)

CT
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#18
Quote by saichoo
Depends how you define it. We could be talking about exactly the same thing with different words. In this case, I was using falsetto as classical teachers use it, which essentially amounts to male head voice. But you also make the (important) distinction with how Singing Success use it - falsetto being a weak, breathy condition and head voice being the ideal condition.


No. Falsetto, other than when it comes to countertenors, is not looked well upon in classical music. Modal voice - chest voice, mixed voice, head voice, which, as pointed out in above post, is gradual, is what is generally used in classical music. Falsetto is another way of producing notes, the above harmonics-anology is rather good.

Surprise, females also have falsetto. Yes, yes, this was scientifically investigated, and females could produce sound using the same physiological procedure. Here be pictures and good physiological descriptions:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falsetto

Here be two well-respected countertenors singing a duet by Henry Purcell:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DBs9PcvGTUQ&NR=1
#19
I stand corrected. My vocal knowledge seems to be out of date. From Allan Lindquest:

"We recognize that the larynx has the duality of having two vocal cords or vocal bands, and that they can function physiologically in two ways...One we call the pure chest register...The other we call the “little head” or flute register or in men’s voices, falsetto."

Or maybe I'm interpreting it wrong.
#20
^ I googled that quote and found it among a bunch of other quotes from Lamperti's "Vocal Wisdom."

Here is the full, and so-far-as-I-know unedited quote: "We recognize that the larynx has the duality of having two vocal cords or vocal bands, and that they can function physiologically in two ways. One we call the pure chest register, or the crico-thyroid mechanism, which operates in the full thickness and length of the cords. The other we call the “little head” or flute register or in men’s voices, falsetto. "

I have bolded the rest of the one sentence that you abridged with the ... and it seems that the abridged quote makes it a little misleading from the original.

Despite calling it pure chest register, he makes the further description of the voice being produced by the full length of the vocal cords, and then compares that to falsetto.

Also note that he calls falsetto "little head" register and not head register.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.