#1
I was just wondering if anyone has any experience with how to get a sponsorship of any kind as a guitarist. I'm in a band, and we haven't started playing gigs yet, but plan to around the beginning of next year. I'm in severe need of a new amp, and would LOVE a Jet City sponsorship, but I realize that's probably out of the question. An amp sponsorship in general would be awesome, but again, I realize that it's not likely at this point. I've thought about a Monster (energy drink) sponsorship, and an Ernie Ball string sponsorship would be awesome, as well as a Dunlop pick sponsorship. My band has a demo that we recently did of originals, and we want to get some of our covers recorded for Youtube. Our demo is already on Youtube, but there is no actual video to it.

Does anyone have any ideas for me? The stuff we've recorded so far is basically modern Thrash Metal, if that matters at all.

Here is a list of current brands i own (in case this helps):

Amp: Marshall
Cables: Monster
Guitar: Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Pickups: Seymour Duncan (Pearly Gates and AlNiCo II Pro)
Strings: Ernie Ball Power Slinkies
Picks: Dunlop Gator Grip 2mm or Tortex 1.14mm (I prefer the gator grips)
Tuning Machines: Grover
Straplocks: Schaller
Pedals: Dunlop Wah, DigiTech Hardwire TL-2

That's all I can think of at the moment. Thanks for any help you can give me

Edit:
Amp Brands I'm interested in:
Marshall
Fender
Peavey
Bugera
Jet City
Blackstar
Egnater
Mesa
Splawn
ENGL
Bogner
(Let me know if you want specific models)
Last edited by Blktiger0 at Oct 11, 2011,
#2
Usually you have to do a certain number of paid gigs a year to qualify to even be looked at for an endorsement.

At least, that's how dunlop do it
ProTone Pedals: Attack Overdrive
Fractal Audio: AxeFX 2
Engl: Fireball 60
Zilla: Fatboy 2x12
Carvin: DC700
Carvin: Vader 7
Schecter: KM-7 MKii
Schecter: Banshee 8 Passive
Jackson: DK2M
#3
To be extremely blunt, there is no-way you can get an endorsement from a major brand anytime soon, that's just how it is. At the level you are on, there is no benefit for a company to endorse you.

An endorsed artist is more or less a sales rep for the company, i.e. they believe that particular artist can sell more stuff for them. All out "give stuff for free"-endorsements are very rare as well, and reserved for guys like Metallica (who can just snap their fingers at the ESP custom shop and get a guitar, bastards....) or Jeff Loomis (who has Schecter at the palm of his hand), most endorsements are in the nature that you can buy their stuff at a very, very reduced price.

So, how to get one?
-Get exposure, show companies that:
1. You are loyal to their product, and shares the values of the company.
2. That you have a loyal audience that can be persuaded to buy the company's stuff because you play it.
3. That they benefit from having you as a face outwards (closely tied with point two).

-Preferably doing something new musically is beneficial for endorsements, look at the emerging djent-scene, the companies are falling over each other to accomodate (sic) the djenters, especially Ibanez, Bareknuckle, and DiMarzio. Misha Mansoor is like 25 and has already endorsements with Mayones, DiMarzio and Fractal Audio. I'm not advicing you to sell your music, but being innovative helps

-I would recommend smaller and newer brands for endorsements, they are generally more generous, Jet City and Blackstar are two that you mentioned that seems like possible candidates, they are resonably new, and they usually have an eye for the up and coming.

-Check for small luthiers that can be persuaded to endorse you, perhaps even a local one. The larger brands are almost impossible to get from as a new musician, so I advice you to start small.

Hope this helped, and remember, it's all about never giving up
Last edited by Blargaha at Oct 11, 2011,
#4
I'm assuming you pretty much have to have released some CD and be able to play gigs regularly, and it'll probably be a lot easier to get the contacts needed through a label, so you better get workin'
#5
Quote by Blargaha
To be extremely blunt, there is no-way you can get an endorsement from a major brand anytime soon, that's just how it is. At the level you are on, there is no benefit for a company to endorse you.

An endorsed artist is more or less a sales rep for the company, i.e. they believe that particular artist can sell more stuff for them. All out "give stuff for free"-endorsements are very rare as well, and reserved for guys like Metallica (who can just snap their fingers at the ESP custom shop and get a guitar, bastards....) or Jeff Loomis (who has Schecter at the palm of his hand), most endorsements are in the nature that you can buy their stuff at a very, very reduced price.

So, how to get one?
-Get exposure, show companies that:
1. You are loyal to their product, and shares the values of the company.
2. That you have a loyal audience that can be persuaded to buy the company's stuff because you play it.
3. That they benefit from having you as a face outwards (closely tied with point two).
4. Preferably doing something new musically is beneficial for endorsements, look at the emerging djent-scene, the companies are falling over each other to accomodate (sic) the djenters, especially Ibanez, Bareknuckle, and DiMarzio. Misha Mansoor is like 25 and has already endorsements with Mayones, DiMarzio and Fractal Audio. I'm not advicing you to sell your music, but being innovative helps

-I would recommend smaller and newer brands for endorsements, they are generally more generous, Jet City and Blackstar are two that you mentioned that seems like possible candidates, they are resonably new, and they usually have an eye for the up and coming.
-Check for small luthiers that can be persuaded to endorse you, perhaps even a local one. The larger brands are almost impossible to get from as a new musician, so I advice you to start small.

Hope this helped, and remember, it's all about never giving up


I knew the bigger brands were out of the question, I was just giving examples of stuff I'm interested in. I've read in older posts that it's best to start with non-music brands (such as Monster, Redbull, Beer, Clothing, etc.) and to build from there. I also realize that music brands just giving me free shit is out of the question at this point, but even a discount would be outstanding. I really want the Jet City JCA100HDM, but can't afford it at the moment. I'm hoping that playing gigs can generate me some funds to help with this purchase, but until then I'm stuck with much shittier options. I also thought that it might be possible to get an Avatar cabinet sponsorship, since they seem to be not very well known, but they make great products. Most of my gigs starting out will be here at my college campus (Ohio University in Athens, Ohio, if that helps), but we're hoping to play other nearby areas as well. We are waiting until after Christmas break to start gigging, and the student-run Record Label is supposed to be signing us soon as well. I personally am a Graphic Design student, and have already designed our Logo, and will be doing all of our shirts, album covers, etc., so we already have our own "brand", which will hopefully help us to look more professional. I was also thinking we might be able to get a sponsorship from a local shirt business that would make our shirts at a discount.

If you have any other ideas, please keep 'em flowing. One that a friend of mine mentioned is to try and get one of our songs on a video game commercial. Apparently some nobody band got their song on an Assassin's Creed commercial and now half the gaming community knows their band.
#6
just a thought about bigger brands being impossible... I always thought if you wanted sponsorship the best way would be through teaching.

Are Justin Guitar or Marty Schwartz (gutiarjamz?) sponsored?

If I was was guitar manufacturer I would go after signing up those guys, because musician types already have brand bias are are locked into a sound. I bet Justin Guitar as well over a million you tube hits, and tons of beginner videos.

If I was saw a Fender rep I would be looking to make sure every one of that guy's videos was done with the sweetest Fender rig possible. the guy sounds great arent most guitars bought by people who want to learn?
he of tranquil mind
#7
I think you're probably dreaming if you think that Jet City or another boutique amp maker is going to be eager to sponsor you just because they're "small." Jet City is some serious high end gear. If you want an idea of the level of success you need to be sponsored by them, click on the "artists" page on their web site.

Not huge names. But people who are gigging all the time, have established fan bases or residencies. They're all people who, at the very least, past the "we're planning to start playing gigs next year," stage years ago.

I actually think it's probably easier to get a sponsorship from some of the big guys. They put out so much product that they can afford it. What's giving away one more amp head mean to Marshall?

And I mean this in the nicest possible way, but reading your list of amp brands, it sounds a lot like you're just saying "give me free stuff!" Is there any amp brand you've heard that you're NOT interested in?

In any event, stop putting the cart before the horse. I know of bands that have gotten sponsorships relatively quickly (although I don't know the details, for example, I know that Of Verona got some gear sponsorships before their EP came out, and before they had played two dozen gigs. They had some early buzz because the singer had previous had a major label deal, but even still) but ultimately, it's going to come down to you convincing somebody that you're offering something unique, compelling, and powerful, or that you've got a fanbase they want to get in front of.

So get out there and start playing gigs. Develop a fan base. And then figure it out from a sponsorship point of view.
#8
Get your name out there, start playing, and get your fan base as large as you can. As said above, companies will only sponsor you if they think they can make money off of you.

And I mean this in the nicest possible way, but reading your list of amp brands, it sounds a lot like you're just saying "give me free stuff!" Is there any amp brand you've heard that you're NOT interested in?


Yeah, I thought that too.
#9
you could always get a job and buy new equipment like everybody else

and endorsements don't mean 'lol free stuff' most of the time it's just a hefty discount.
modes are a social construct
#10
Nice insight guys, 10x.

I am from Romania and being sponsored is a big dream for everyone here especially that we don;t have a big fan base for the stuff that i play (metalcore, deathcore, hardcore).

I don;t if it helps but i read a book about pimps once (was interested to see their lifestyle)

And the music industry is basically the same.

Although many don;t realise it, the major labels are the pimps and the bands and artists are basically their hoes .

The labels know that they can always get something new anytime so i guess their the ones who make the rulez )
#11
Ask yourself how you can add VALUE to the company(s). Remember they are running/building a business and the number 1 goal for them is to make money. So how can you, as an artist, offer them more sales and exposure of their product. How can YOU attract more people to buy the gear that you are using for them.
Basically they want to know what's in it for them. You have to know what YOU can do for them. In a nutshell you have to lower the risk for them by investing their time and money into you and you have to provide MASSIVE value! For THEM!
Commit to Mastery!


Allen Hopgood
#12
Why would anyone endorse you if you're not even gigging?
I'd probably stop thinking about endorsement for a while yet, but quite simply the best way to do it is build a relationship with a company.
The bigger the company, the harder it is to have that relationship.
If/After you get a reasonable following, and say you get invited to play a big regional festival - ring up some energy drink companies/clothing companies and small musical brands and ask if they're interested in going to watch you or sponsor a stage or ask if they'd let you run a monster refreshment area or a tent to sell merch or something.
Couple of things like that and you will be on their list of interests, and you might even start getting discounts for thier stuff.
Once they start coming to you with offers to do something for them, then you're on the way to getting endorsed.


The thing that strikes me most is people always seem to think these things just happen. It comes down to how much work you put into things. Good luck.
Always waiting for that bit of inspiration.
#14
Just to add my bit, even though everything seems to be covered now.

Don't think "my band's getting a demo together, time to contact companies", the only way that thought will work is if you're famous and creating a new project.

You have the wrong mindset about this, you don't have to think "I want endorsement deals with companies" you have to think "I want to get a fanbase and popularity as a musician". Endorsement deals essentially mean **** all until you're really doing the brand a service. At the start it'll be something along the lines of a 10% discount. What it really means at the start is you get a bit of free promotion in that you can say "I'm a [company] artist" which makes you look good.

You get almost no benefit from being an endorsee of any company until you rake in the fans. Mainly as you'll be paying for your first bit of gear of there's pretty much full price (if you buy it after being endorsed it won't be far off full price) and you won't be getting anything for free off them (aside from t-shirts and stuff) for a long while.

Generally, what I'm trying to say, is completely forget about endorsements, you don't need them right now. What you need is a fanbase. Work as hard as you can to get a fanbase. Meaning get gigging. Gig as much as you can, have a good attitude and make friends (that is to say, don't say "hey guys, give us your fans, now we're going, bye" you need to genuinely be friendly) with other bands.

When you get to be a well known name around your local area (being your town/city and surrounding towns/cities) and it can always help to build a bit of a fanbase online and in any other places you can get to, that is the time to seek mild endorsements (strings, picks or cables, stuff like that).

If you ever get to the stage where you can get endorsements (by this I mean companies that help you, promotion and whatnot, or one that can benefit you with their products, like string endorsements which can get you strings for like £1 a pack or something), make sure you keep your attitude in check.
I've seen people with the weakest endorsements who think they're famous because they have an endorsement deal with companies that no one's heard of.


Hmm, I've written way too much, I don't think this all makes coherent sense either!
#15
Usually the first endorsements you recieve will come from local music shops and the like, not massive companies that just happened to find you. Even those non-music brands are ridiculous for a band that hasn't played any gigs.

If you want a new amp, do what I did. Get a job and save up for one
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#16
Quote by HotspurJr
I think you're probably dreaming if you think that Jet City or another boutique amp maker is going to be eager to sponsor you just because they're "small." Jet City is some serious high end gear. If you want an idea of the level of success you need to be sponsored by them, click on the "artists" page on their web site.

Not huge names. But people who are gigging all the time, have established fan bases or residencies. They're all people who, at the very least, past the "we're planning to start playing gigs next year," stage years ago.

I actually think it's probably easier to get a sponsorship from some of the big guys. They put out so much product that they can afford it. What's giving away one more amp head mean to Marshall?

And I mean this in the nicest possible way, but reading your list of amp brands, it sounds a lot like you're just saying "give me free stuff!" Is there any amp brand you've heard that you're NOT interested in?

In any event, stop putting the cart before the horse. I know of bands that have gotten sponsorships relatively quickly (although I don't know the details, for example, I know that Of Verona got some gear sponsorships before their EP came out, and before they had played two dozen gigs. They had some early buzz because the singer had previous had a major label deal, but even still) but ultimately, it's going to come down to you convincing somebody that you're offering something unique, compelling, and powerful, or that you've got a fanbase they want to get in front of.

So get out there and start playing gigs. Develop a fan base. And then figure it out from a sponsorship point of view.


The point was, I wanted to start getting on this whole endorsement deal now, so by the time we're playing gigs, I'm ready to start talking to these people. I don't want them to just give me free stuff, and there are specific AMPS i'm not interested in, but I don't bias against brands. Obviously, when i say Peavey, I'm much more interested in a 6505 or 6534 than I am a Peavey Windsor. The only reason Fender is even on there is a used one of their amps for my demo and liked how it reacted with my DigiTech Pedal. A Jet City PicoValve isn't going to cut it, but their JCA50, 100, and 100HDM are all great options. Yes, free stuff would be cool as shit, but who wouldn't want free stuff? I was looking more towards a discount, but I would just like to have a Company I like behind me. I'm not really sure what the "Artists" proves, considering I've only heard of Avenged Sevenfold and Mike Soldano (who's part of the company) We already are developing a fan base among our friends, their friends and whatnot using the internet and word of mouth. Luckily, not all of the band members are from the same area, so we can hit more areas at once...e just go to college together, which brings me to my second point.

Quote by Hail
you could always get a job and buy new equipment like everybody else

and endorsements don't mean 'lol free stuff' most of the time it's just a hefty discount.


I have a job, but there's this thing called College that is quite expensive, and my parents don't foot the bill for me like most jack offs. I don't have loaded parents that can just fork out $30,000 a year to pay for my education, and in the long run, it's more important than a new amp considering my chances of getting a normal job are much higher than becoming a big rock star. I'm not trying to just get free shit, but like i've said before here:

Quote by Blktiger0
I knew the bigger brands were out of the question, I was just giving examples of stuff I'm interested in. I've read in older posts that it's best to start with non-music brands (such as Monster, Redbull, Beer, Clothing, etc.) and to build from there. I also realize that music brands just giving me free shit is out of the question at this point, but even a discount would be outstanding. I really want the Jet City JCA100HDM, but can't afford it at the moment. I'm hoping that playing gigs can generate me some funds to help with this purchase, but until then I'm stuck with much shittier options. I also thought that it might be possible to get an Avatar cabinet sponsorship, since they seem to be not very well known, but they make great products. Most of my gigs starting out will be here at my college campus (Ohio University in Athens, Ohio, if that helps), but we're hoping to play other nearby areas as well. We are waiting until after Christmas break to start gigging, and the student-run Record Label is supposed to be signing us soon as well. I personally am a Graphic Design student, and have already designed our Logo, and will be doing all of our shirts, album covers, etc., so we already have our own "brand", which will hopefully help us to look more professional. I was also thinking we might be able to get a sponsorship from a local shirt business that would make our shirts at a discount.


I would be stoked if I could even get a discount. Also, I have already mentioned that playing gigs is one of the ways I hope to help pay for a new amp.

So back to the question at hand, what ARE good companies/places to start looking for sponsorships ONCE WE ARE GIGGING? So far, I've consistently got Local Music Shops, but that's about it. You may think it's too early to start looking, but I don't, so if you'll just help with the question I'm actually asking, that would be appreciated.
Last edited by Blktiger0 at Oct 15, 2011,
#17
I'd hit up the local bakery. Perhaps a local counsellor too.

You're under the impression you deserve far more than you're getting. You say you're building up a fanbase without playing a gig. Wrong. You day that you NEED certain models/brands of amps to play guitar. Wrong. And you go to college AND have a job? Wow stop the presses mate, you must be the first person to have ever done that.

Surely a smart college boy like you can figure out that you have zero chance of getting sponsership anytime soon.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#18
Ok, if you would listen to what we are saying, you would see that major brands are out of the question. Check with like local music stores and stuff like that, but even if you have started to gig you still are not big enough for a major brand. Is it safe to say you have a fanbase of 100-200? Something like that? 2000 would not be enough.

Two of the usual criteria is:
1. Having released at least one record (a demo is usually not good enough)
and
2. Having a stabile amount of paid gigs every month
#19
First off, ask yourself why a company would sponsor you at all. Companies give out sponsorships to get attention; attention is the main thing they want, and if you can't provide that to them... well, your chances don't look good.
You know, even the most famous artists didn't start out with endorsements. They earned them as a perk that came with their success. If you make it big one day (and I'm not saying you won't), you can come back to this question again, and maybe you'll have better luck.
Last edited by Cavalcade at Oct 15, 2011,
#20
It seems as if the TS is focused on the cherry, and not the rest of the cake??

Seriously, sponserships mean feck all until you're big, and by the time you are that big, the difference it will make to your life is minimal..

My take on it, use this energy and make your band better.... Band first, brand second.
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Glory glory Man Utd
#21
Quote by Blktiger0
The point was, I wanted to start getting on this whole endorsement deal now, so by the time we're playing gigs, I'm ready to start talking to these people.


Just because you want to start talking to these people doesn't mean they want to start talking to you.

I can pretty much guarantee you that any response you would get from any of these companies would be, "Um, okay, get back to us once you have a fan base." There's nothing you can do now to make them more willing to endorse you later. They don't care about you right now. You're nobody to them.


I was looking more towards a discount, but I would just like to have a Company I like behind me. I'm not really sure what the "Artists" proves, considering I've only heard of Avenged Sevenfold and Mike Soldano (who's part of the company) We already are developing a fan base among our friends, their friends and whatnot using the internet and word of mouth. Luckily, not all of the band members are from the same area, so we can hit more areas at once...e just go to college together, which brings me to my second point.


Wow. Just wow.

There are hundreds if not thousands of groups of guys who go to college together who are planning to start playing gigs and would "like to have a company [they] like behind [them]." Until you can convince these companies you are worth it to them you are wasting your time.

Your friends are pushing you to their friends? That means nothing to these people. Every band has friends. Every band has friends of friends.

Horse first. Then cart.

First start playing gigs where you gets lots of people showing up excited about listening to your music. You'll probably need an e.p. and/or a good-quality demo, too.

But really, until you have a fanbase of people who are happily paying you money to consume your music, sponsorships are a pipe dream.

I don't have loaded parents that can just fork out $30,000 a year to pay for my education, and in the long run, it's more important than a new amp considering my chances of getting a normal job are much higher than becoming a big rock star.


In other words, music isn't your #1 priority. That might be smart (it's not my #1 priority either) but it's not the sort of thing that makes companies jump up to give you discounts.

So back to the question at hand, what ARE good companies/places to start looking for sponsorships ONCE WE ARE GIGGING? So far, I've consistently got Local Music Shops, but that's about it. You may think it's too early to start looking, but I don't, so if you'll just help with the question I'm actually asking, that would be appreciated.


I don't think there's anything you can do right now to help you get sponsorships with those companies down the line that isn't directly related to becoming the best band you can become with the biggest fanbase you can.

I think you're helping you ability to get sponsorships if you stop thinking so much about how to get sponsorships, and every time you find yourself thinking about it you pick up your guitar and go practice instead.

If you are in college and have a job, then you don't have a lot of free time. Stop wasting it trying to get trivial amounts of money months and months from now. Use it, instead, to become a better musician, performer, and songwriter.

Lastly:

I find your name calling about people who's parents buy them gear remarkably ironic. The only thing I can gather is that you have a problem people who have gear that other people paid for. I'll allow you to make the connection on your own.
Last edited by HotspurJr at Oct 17, 2011,
#22
First things first, I live like 45 minutes from Athens and went there for a year a few years back. It's a nice place. What's your band's name? I'd like to check things out.

Onto your question, you're thinking too far ahead of things. Endorsements, even from small companies, aren't going to come along anytime soon. For a company to want to give you an endorsement you're going to need to have a decent amount of recognition for either your band or yourself on at minimum a regional level, if not a small scale national level. Playing gigs at the Union in Athens on a monthly basis isn't going to entice a company into throwing out an endorsement.

About your current gear situation: Look used. You can find absolute steals out there on used equipment.
Quote by Zeppelin71
Umm. . .uh. . .your mom touched sjones' dick. YOUR MOM TOUCHED OUR GUITARISTS GENITALS IN A CAMPER AT A BIKER FESTIVAL! truth.
Last edited by sjones at Oct 17, 2011,
#23
I haven't read all of the posts in here, so excuse me if I cover some things that are already said. I can guarantee that you will not be getting an amp endorsement at this point regardless of the size of the company. Big companies usually have a check list of requirements and your discount is according to how many things you can check off(major or indie label, how many tour dates, internet exposure, etc.). Small companies really have to pick and chose who they work with, since it's money out of their pockets. But there's no use in beating a dead horse, since everyone else covered that basically.

I can give you some pointers if you want to get things lined up for yourself to be in the position to talk to companies in 1-2 years. Obviously a solid touring/gigging schedule is great. We work with artists all the time who don't "tour", but they do play 200 shows a year in the area they live in. They may not get the same deal as a headlining artist that's touring the world and talks up our gear, but companies know that everyone is not a rock star, and will still work with you. A release on a label, or a self released album with a strong following will be a big check mark. Work on your social network marketing as well. if a company goes to check out your Facebook page, and you've got 500 fans, it doesn't look as good as having 50,000 obviously. Try to book tour schedules as far out as you can as well. If you just say "trust me, we're going to book a bunch of shows", then that obviously isn't as good as going to a company and showing them a solid booked schedule for the next 3-4 months. Getting endorsements from drink companies and things like that are cool, but don't expect it to mean anything to an amp company honestly. This is for the reason that everyone has basically said. What moderately popular local band can't get some free stickers and drinks from Monster these days? Another huge thing for us at least, is when a band comes to us and already has been using one of our amps out there, and they just want to hook up for future purchases and the support of being an official artist. This happens all the time, and it definitely is a major plus in our book, since you obviously aren't just out shopping every brand to see who gives you free stuff(I can't count how many e-mails I've gotten where they forgot to put our name, and it still says Orange, Jet City, Fender, etc. in the e-mail). Any e-mail like that pretty much just gets deleted. All of these things will make you look good, but the main thing is that a company sees you out there working hard at building your own brand. A company will work hard to help you out, but they expect the same back.

Just figured I'd give some input from the inside view of a company.
#24
Quote by sjones
First things first, I live like 45 minutes from Athens and went there for a year a few years back. It's a nice place. What's your band's name? I'd like to check things out.

Onto your question, you're thinking too far ahead of things. Endorsements, even from small companies, aren't going to come along anytime soon. For a company to want to give you an endorsement you're going to need to have a decent amount of recognition for either your band or yourself on at minimum a regional level, if not a small scale national level. Playing gigs at the Union in Athens on a monthly basis isn't going to entice a company into throwing out an endorsement.

About your current gear situation: Look used. You can find absolute steals out there on used equipment.



The band is called Shadow Cell, and we're going through quite the bumpy road at the moment. Our bassist hasn't been enrolled this quarter, but is coming back Winter quarter, but the singer and myself especially are probably not returning next quarter, although we will still be down for the band. Look for us around the beginning of 2012 in the Smiling Skull and The Union, although we might be gigging in other local areas, those two are almost guaranteed. We also are planning a gig in the Cincinnati area before December 18th, when we should be playing the Columbus Metal Festival at the Alrosa. We were invited to play there, but we want to get a few gigs under our belt before tackling a festival. Our second guitarist is very new to gigging and has told us he's likely to choke on stage, so we're trying to build up some confidence before playing too large of an audience. Luckily, not coming back here means a performance amp will be my Christmas present to myself ;D


Quote by Ian Egnater
I haven't read all of the posts in here, so excuse me if I cover some things that are already said. I can guarantee that you will not be getting an amp endorsement at this point regardless of the size of the company. Big companies usually have a check list of requirements and your discount is according to how many things you can check off(major or indie label, how many tour dates, internet exposure, etc.). Small companies really have to pick and chose who they work with, since it's money out of their pockets. But there's no use in beating a dead horse, since everyone else covered that basically.

I can give you some pointers if you want to get things lined up for yourself to be in the position to talk to companies in 1-2 years. Obviously a solid touring/gigging schedule is great. We work with artists all the time who don't "tour", but they do play 200 shows a year in the area they live in. They may not get the same deal as a headlining artist that's touring the world and talks up our gear, but companies know that everyone is not a rock star, and will still work with you. A release on a label, or a self released album with a strong following will be a big check mark. Work on your social network marketing as well. if a company goes to check out your Facebook page, and you've got 500 fans, it doesn't look as good as having 50,000 obviously. Try to book tour schedules as far out as you can as well. If you just say "trust me, we're going to book a bunch of shows", then that obviously isn't as good as going to a company and showing them a solid booked schedule for the next 3-4 months. Getting endorsements from drink companies and things like that are cool, but don't expect it to mean anything to an amp company honestly. This is for the reason that everyone has basically said. What moderately popular local band can't get some free stickers and drinks from Monster these days? Another huge thing for us at least, is when a band comes to us and already has been using one of our amps out there, and they just want to hook up for future purchases and the support of being an official artist. This happens all the time, and it definitely is a major plus in our book, since you obviously aren't just out shopping every brand to see who gives you free stuff(I can't count how many e-mails I've gotten where they forgot to put our name, and it still says Orange, Jet City, Fender, etc. in the e-mail). Any e-mail like that pretty much just gets deleted. All of these things will make you look good, but the main thing is that a company sees you out there working hard at building your own brand. A company will work hard to help you out, but they expect the same back.

Just figured I'd give some input from the inside view of a company.



Thanks for the insight! Honestly, I wasn't planning on actually asking ANYONE for endorsements for a good while, I just wanted to scout some places out, know what I should look for, and know how to go about it before I actually did. I'm not trying to "put the cart before the horse" like stated by another UGer, I'm simply trying to make sure I know the workings of the cart before I try and attach it to the horse.

I do appreciate the insight, though, and hopefully will be on either Egnater or another company's Artists page some time in the next couple years That new Armageddon looks QUITE amazing...
#25
Let's put it this way. I make guitars (let's say....) and they sell for $1000. Great.

Now, if I give you a 30% discount, that means that I will be essentially "giving" you $300.

What do *I* get for MY $300? You'll tell your friends? That's nice. Thanks. Is that worth $300 to me? No, probably not. I could pay one of my reps to go do a couple of in-stores for that - clinics and such - for less than that, which will probably lead more directly to more sales that I can track.

Now, on the other side of things.... consider this:
What kind of guitar does Angus play?
What kind of guitar did Hendrix play?
What kind of guitar does Vai play?

We readily associate those names with a company. For decades, kids around the world have wanted a Strat because Hendrix played one. For decades, kids around the world have picked up the guitar and dreamed of a Gibson because Angus or Page played one. People went ape-sh!t buying up every Ibanez on the market because Vai played them.

That kind of endorsement is worth millions to a company.

Who is going to see YOU playing such-and-such an amp, or chewing some brand of bubble-gum, or drinking some energy drink and say to themselves, "Hey! I want to buy one of those because Blktiger0 is the bomb and that's what he uses!" Really. How many?

Stop the average person in your town. How many of them have heard of you, or your band?

Endorsement is about image with respect to recognition and acclaim. You might not know Kenny Aronoff's name, but Vic Firth and Zildjian can fall all over themselves because their products are endorsed by "the guy who has played drums for the likes of John cougar Mellencamp, Rod Stewart, Smashing Pumpkins, and many others."

Hey, if it's good enough for the Pumpkins, it's good enough for me, yes?

Can the same be said for you?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.