#1
Howdy,

As of recent, I've been teaching myself a lot more theory. I'm 15 and self taught for 5 years, so forgive my arrogance.

Anyways, my question regards modes. Basically, I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around them.

If I'm messing around in C Major, I could move up the neck and play the same scale off the 5th (G). Since the 5th scale degree is Mixolydian, and I'm playing the same notes, am I playing a G Mixolydian mode? And could I also play a D Dorian off the C Major scale?

My reasoning here is that a G Mixolydian has the same notes as a C Major, just using G as the root.

Again, I'm not sure I understand the whole modes thing, but any help is appreciated.

Cheers,
Sleepyhead <3
#3
Guy above is idiot.
C Ionian (Major) = G Mixolydian.
C ionian = A Aeolian etc.
The only difference is the root.
By the way, doing mode changes in a song where all the notes are same is retarded.
A Aeolian to A Mixolydian can sound cool.
#5
Basically if you're in C major, the scale ranges from C to C. The modes in C major are:
Dorian - D to D
Phrygian - E to E
Lydian - F to F
Mixolydian - G to G
Aeolian - A to A
Locrian - B to B

Modes are just starting on different notes in a scale and open you up to new ways of approaching solos in the key.
Does this make sence?
#6
Quote by Keth
No.

If you're 'messing' around in C major, you're messing around in C major, no modes, *period*.

Only good response. Sigh.

If you're playing in the key of C major, you're already denying any idea of you playing modes. A key depends on where the progression resolves.

Just think about it. If you play G Mixolydian over a progression in C major, how does it differ from the C major scale? You start from a different note? That is irrelevant. You can start from any note even if you're playing C major. Playing G Mixolydian in this case is playing C major.

For modal playing you need a modal vamp or progression.

Modes aren't the holy grail you're looking for. You should rather learn tonal theory and concepts related to it. Modes won't give you much benefit before you have a firm understanding of tonal theory.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1042392
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#7
Please do not listen to anybody above (except Keth and Flibo). They do not know what they're talking about.

If you're playing tonal music (which you are) there will be an inherent resolution in the chord progression. You're playing in that scale. You might be using accidentals, but you're still playing in that scale. If you're highlighting the chord tones of a V chord in a C major progression, you're still playing in C major.

Modal playing is extremely limiting and can be rather boring if you're not a god of theory. Learn to highlight your chord tones and learn your scales (notes, not shapes) and arpeggios inside and out. You'll be set for life.
modes are a social construct
#8
You can't just play scales starting on different notes. Modal music must have a sense of resolution to the tonic of the mode. You have to establish a particular tonic by the way you compose the music.

With your method of just shifting the scale patterns you'll just be playing different major scales, not modes.

To hear the sound of the modes try ringing out an open string on the tonic note while playing the relevant scale over it.

To better see the intervals of the mode, play the scale up and down a single string at first. You will see where the semitones and tones lie to create the sound of the mode against the tonic and how they differ in position from the major or minor scale in either one or two places, depending on the mode, thus giving them their flavour.

However, before you do all this, understand that modal music is of limited usefulness because of the effort needed to maintain the modal sound gives fewer harmonic options than non-modal music.
Last edited by Jehannum at Oct 11, 2011,
#9
Quote by Flibo
Only good response. Sigh.

If you're playing in the key of C major, you're already denying any idea of you playing modes. A key depends on where the progression resolves.

Just think about it. If you play G Mixolydian over a progression in C major, how does it differ from the C major scale? You start from a different note? That is irrelevant. You can start from any note even if you're playing C major. Playing G Mixolydian in this case is playing C major.

For modal playing you need a modal vamp or progression.

Modes aren't the holy grail you're looking for. You should rather learn tonal theory and concepts related to it. Modes won't give you much benefit before you have a firm understanding of tonal theory.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1042392



#10
Quote by JB95
Guy above is idiot.
C Ionian (Major) = G Mixolydian.
C ionian = A Aeolian etc.
The only difference is the root.
By the way, doing mode changes in a song where all the notes are same is retarded.
A Aeolian to A Mixolydian can sound cool.

Keth is not an idiot :S.
And he is Dutch like me .
#11
Quote by JB95

A Aeolian to A Mixolydian can sound cool.


so A minor to the parallel major with a minor 7th is what you're trying to say
modes are a social construct
#12
Quote by BledGhostWhite
Howdy,

As of recent, I've been teaching myself a lot more theory. I'm 15 and self taught for 5 years, so forgive my arrogance.

Anyways, my question regards modes. Basically, I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around them.

If I'm messing around in C Major, I could move up the neck and play the same scale off the 5th (G). Since the 5th scale degree is Mixolydian, and I'm playing the same notes, am I playing a G Mixolydian mode? And could I also play a D Dorian off the C Major scale?

My reasoning here is that a G Mixolydian has the same notes as a C Major, just using G as the root.

Again, I'm not sure I understand the whole modes thing, but any help is appreciated.

Cheers,
Sleepyhead <3

Name intervals and formula for G Mixolydian.
#13
Quote by BledGhostWhite
Howdy,

As of recent, I've been teaching myself a lot more theory. I'm 15 and self taught for 5 years, so forgive my arrogance.

Anyways, my question regards modes. Basically, I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around them.

If I'm messing around in C Major, I could move up the neck and play the same scale off the 5th (G). Since the 5th scale degree is Mixolydian, and I'm playing the same notes, am I playing a G Mixolydian mode? And could I also play a D Dorian off the C Major scale?

My reasoning here is that a G Mixolydian has the same notes as a C Major, just using G as the root.

Again, I'm not sure I understand the whole modes thing, but any help is appreciated.

Cheers,
Sleepyhead <3


You don't understand the modes because everything you are probably reading and hearing about them out there is, itself wrong, or missing or incomplete. Sorry to say.

Second, you arent alone in this "lostness", but you are only playing in C Major, even beiginning on G Mixolydian as you say.

Here's how you know...because the note that will feel "finished" is going to be a C. Simple as that. If it were Mixolydian your "finished" note would feel like a note that when you checked, is a G. In C Major that will never happen.

Best,

Sean