#1
Hi I always hear that the type of wood used to build a guitar is extremely important because it contributes to the tone.

However, I also hear this is mostly true for acoustic guitars and the majority of a electric guitars sound is generated from the electronics, and the material has marginal impact in comparison to acoustic guitars.

So here's what I'm asking:
Is there anywhere that actually compares the difference in sounds that you can actually hear (other than just little charts or something saying "This ones brighter, this ones warmer") and does anyone know if things such as Carbon Fiber, and Graphite guitars sound similar to any type of wood? Like are they closer to mahogany or basswood for example.
#2
Probably one of the better questions I've seen asked here. I have no idea, lol. Kinda curious to see if anyone comes up with anything.
Quote by fly135
Great list Rutch. On re-reading this one I'd have to say Solid State means not liquid or gas.

I figured it out.
#3
I do recall some guy making a series of comparison videos on youtube between how a alder/basswood/something else guitar sounded when switching between neck and bridge pickup, and clean.....

But I disregarded it because he used different pickups on each guitar.
#4
I've never seen any comparison charts or whatever. The problem with comparing body woods against each other like that is you would have to somehow ensure that the neck, pickups, hadrware, electronics and construction are all identical on both guitars, and that's not possible. The only way you could really do it would be to use a guitar like a Strat where everything can be taken apart fairly easily and have some identical bodies made, one in alder, one in ash, one in mahogany, so on. That's what Warmoth did and how they came up with their comparisons which is why you'll see so many people refer to Warmoth's descriptions for body wood tones.
#6
descriptions of wood != charts

And Warmoth's is more accurate, in my experience.
#7
Quote by zomgguitarz1234
However, I also hear this is mostly true for acoustic guitars and the majority of a electric guitars sound is generated from the electronics, and the material has marginal impact in comparison to acoustic guitars.


Me personally, I wouldn't take tonewoods into heart as much on an electric, if at all. I think the only thing I would take into consideration is the weight. You can take a 1473 Gibsonian Lessa Paulo made from Chinese Ancient Oak and play it through a Spider and it will still sound comparable to other guitars plugged into the same amp.

On an acoustic, however, different wood combinations are key to the sound you are wanting to achieve.
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#8
Good resonant wood means increased sustain and clearer attack. >_> Makes it kind of a big deal with electrics too, but only if you're seeking pro-level perfectionist tone.
Quote by fly135
Great list Rutch. On re-reading this one I'd have to say Solid State means not liquid or gas.

I figured it out.
#9
One thing I noticed is that guitars retain their unplugged qualities when they're plugged in. I think that's extremely important. The electronics shape how the the sound goes into the amp. The amp just amplifies what you plug into it. The electronics and amp cannot create what's not there. I think the wood is very important as well as every other aspect. You can't call one thing more important than others because they all effect each other to create one guitar.
#10
^^^ up a few posts, ill have to print that when i get home...

im about to attemplt building a body but imma gonna buy a neck
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No.


Well, technically it could be done, but only in the same way that you could change a cat into a hamburger. It's an unpleasant process, and nobody is happy with the result.
#11
Make an electric guitar out of concrete and THEN tell me that what it's made of doesn't matter..
Then there's this band called Slice The Cake...

Bunch of faggots putting random riffs together and calling it "progressive" deathcore.
Stupid name.
Probably picked "for teh lulz"

Mod in UG's Official Gain Whores
#14
Watch the video the guy above you posted. He plays two guitars, one made of concrete and the other a solid body wood guitar of unknown make and model (to ensure people who own the same axe don't call it out and spoil the experiment, as he's trying to see if people can tell the difference between the two.) I can. You may not be able to. I've noticed a lot of people on there commenting saying the second sounds brighter, some saying the second is more bassy and deeper. My ear picked up on the brightness of the first one, but also the lack of resonance and depth. Sounded kind of sterile. The second, I could hear the resonance of the guitar respond to what he played. Very deep, almost echo-y sounding. Give it a listen and see if it matters at all to you. Also, some Steinberger guitars are made of phenolic compounds. Might wanna do a lil research on that.
Quote by fly135
Great list Rutch. On re-reading this one I'd have to say Solid State means not liquid or gas.

I figured it out.
#15
Kind of off topic, but does anybody have the link for the video posted here where a guy played a guitar that was pretty much a neck bolted to a plank and it sounded great?
Honk
#16
just more food for thought, have you seen the carbon guitar xox audio is making?
they have more sustain than the heaviest gibson and are lighter than the slimest ibanez s
the denser a material the more sound resonates.. PUS however make an insanely bigger difference on eles.. wood is secondary
#17
Quote by Ishiga
Watch the video the guy above you posted. He plays two guitars, one made of concrete and the other a solid body wood guitar of unknown make and model (to ensure people who own the same axe don't call it out and spoil the experiment, as he's trying to see if people can tell the difference between the two.) I can. You may not be able to. I've noticed a lot of people on there commenting saying the second sounds brighter, some saying the second is more bassy and deeper. My ear picked up on the brightness of the first one, but also the lack of resonance and depth. Sounded kind of sterile. The second, I could hear the resonance of the guitar respond to what he played. Very deep, almost echo-y sounding. Give it a listen and see if it matters at all to you. Also, some Steinberger guitars are made of phenolic compounds. Might wanna do a lil research on that.


Not really sure if I'm going to make a guitar out of concrete.

I was thinking more of mainstream alternatives to wood, and really wood itself.

Everyone says "Mahogany is brighter than this" but you don't really get any comparison to tell how much brighter, and if it really makes a big enough difference.

C
Quote by Mukersman
Kind of off topic, but does anybody have the link for the video posted here where a guy played a guitar that was pretty much a neck bolted to a plank and it sounded great?


Closest I can come up with.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VMz2KoIxWIY
Last edited by zomgguitarz1234 at Oct 13, 2011,
#20
I've always heard that a guitar made from maple would be SUPER SUPER bright, anyone have any information on this? I'm building a guitar, and just curious to see what people think about it.
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#21
Quote by Tango616
I've always heard that a guitar made from maple would be SUPER SUPER bright, anyone have any information on this? I'm building a guitar, and just curious to see what people think about it.

Just look at many neck-thrus. They often use maple and walnut(2 bright woods) for half of the body. And I'd have to say, the part of the body connected to the neck, pickups, and bridge would probably be the most crucial part for tone and string resonance transfer. It's not uncommon to stick a regular body wood on the sides to try to even out the tone, but I wonder, does that really make a dfference.

Anyway, if you find a neck-thru with alder sides, I'd take a look at that and see if it's too bright.
#22
Quote by W4RP1G
Just look at many neck-thrus. They often use maple and walnut(2 bright woods) for half of the body. And I'd have to say, the part of the body connected to the neck, pickups, and bridge would probably be the most crucial part for tone and string resonance transfer. It's not uncommon to stick a regular body wood on the sides to try to even out the tone, but I wonder, does that really make a dfference.

Anyway, if you find a neck-thru with alder sides, I'd take a look at that and see if it's too bright.

Mhmm, as far as I know, the neck wood will be maple, but as for the body it's all maple, I'll see what I can find though, hopefully going to have something other than a 100% maple guitar.
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#23
I actually have a les paul standard copy by a company called *Stedman Pro*. Its about 12 lbs and has nice sustain. They go for about $125.

I get compliments on the unique tone. People ask me about it all the time when I take it to test out amps. The secret is that its made out of Basswood. Thats where the unique midrange presence comes from. I just let them assume it's the upgrades...and it's mahogany.
I bet Charlie Brown's teacher's name was Mrs.Hammett
#24
Depends alot on what electronics you use, but even then wood still comes into play.

For example, I own a guitar with an EMG matched humbucker pair; 81/60 I believe. Normally these pick ups are very sterile, but since the guitar I have them in has very nice wood, the pick ups can sound beautiful on the clean settings.

Really it's just a mix of lot's of things.
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#25
You do the 18v mod?
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