#1
Heya =)
I'm Lisa, 26, (a girl obviously). I've been playing rhythm guitar for about 3 years. But I've always wanted to play Lead.
I'm just using the minor pentatonic scales. Or rather, I'm just using the one pattern and finding the root notes to move through to each minor scale.
I've found this makes it easier to switch from the Am pentatonic to a Bm or whatever, since I've memorised the one pattern, but my attempts at solos still sound too 'scaley' and frankly crap.
I know how to bend and and use vibrato but I tend to just repeat the same lousy tricks. I don't much like hammer-on's or pull-off's either so it's not about that.

I tend to get stuck on the same things, like: Bend on the 7th fret 3rd string, resolve to 5thfret 3rd string slide back to 5thfret3rd string, slide to 9th fret 3rdstring, slide to 12 fret 3rd string, bend. blah blah blah.
I'm only just starting to learn, and it all seems so overwhelming so, any tips would be appreciated.
Cheers.
#2
Quote by SnowFox234
Heya =)
I'm Lisa, 26, (a girl obviously). I've been playing rhythm guitar for about 3 years. But I've always wanted to play Lead.
I'm just using the minor pentatonic scales. Or rather, I'm just using the one pattern and finding the root notes to move through to each minor scale.
I've found this makes it easier to switch from the Am pentatonic to a Bm or whatever, since I've memorised the one pattern, but my attempts at solos still sound too 'scaley' and frankly crap.
I know how to bend and and use vibrato but I tend to just repeat the same lousy tricks. I don't much like hammer-on's or pull-off's either so it's not about that.

I tend to get stuck on the same things, like: Bend on the 7th fret 3rd string, resolve to 5thfret 3rd string slide back to 5thfret3rd string, slide to 9th fret 3rdstring, slide to 12 fret 3rd string, bend. blah blah blah.
I'm only just starting to learn, and it all seems so overwhelming so, any tips would be appreciated.
Cheers.


What are you using to improvise to? I'd suggest get a variety of jam tracks in different keys. I also suggest a lot of slow blues types so that you can play and experiment with bends and a lot of feeling. After you have done this a while, get a book fo blues licks, and try them one by one, changing them up a bit as you go, and build a vocabulary. There are all beginner level/confidence building ideas, and you have to do this a while to explore these pitch collections.

If you are playing the same things, stop and think before you play anything, what can you do different;y this time? What worked, what didn't. Evaluate the sound of things, if one thing doesnt sound good, file it away and try another.

You're just starting out, these areas have to be developed over time.

Best,

Sean
#3
Develop your ear.

Once you know one scale shape pattern, you want to develop your ear, and work on hearing what you play BEFORE you play it. This gets you thinking in terms of SOUNDS not SHAPES.

People play repetitively like how you describe because they are just relying on muscle memory rather than musical ideas. Learning more scale shapes doesn't really solve the problem - you'll be drawing from a bigger pool of ideas, but they'll quickly become just as repetitive.

The book "Ear Training" by Keith Wyatt et al is a good place to start improving your ear.
#4
Quote by SnowFox234
Heya =)
I'm Lisa, 26, (a girl obviously). I've been playing rhythm guitar for about 3 years. But I've always wanted to play Lead.
I'm just using the minor pentatonic scales. Or rather, I'm just using the one pattern and finding the root notes to move through to each minor scale.
I've found this makes it easier to switch from the Am pentatonic to a Bm or whatever, since I've memorised the one pattern, but my attempts at solos still sound too 'scaley' and frankly crap.
I know how to bend and and use vibrato but I tend to just repeat the same lousy tricks. I don't much like hammer-on's or pull-off's either so it's not about that.

I tend to get stuck on the same things, like: Bend on the 7th fret 3rd string, resolve to 5thfret 3rd string slide back to 5thfret3rd string, slide to 9th fret 3rdstring, slide to 12 fret 3rd string, bend. blah blah blah.
I'm only just starting to learn, and it all seems so overwhelming so, any tips would be appreciated.
Cheers.


The scales and techniques only represent part of what's going on. You need to take all the other stuff in and absorb before you'll be able to do it yourself. You also need to experience it all in context. Practicing bends isn't the same as practicing a solo that utilizes bends, just as playing the pentatonic scale isn't the same as playing a solo that utilizes the pentatonic scale.

Melodies, phrasing, dynamics, feel/expression....

It's in the context of music that it all comes together.

I would suggest learning a bunch of solos before attempting to create/play your own.
Learn them, memorize them, study them, play the crap out of them, and enjoy the process.

*when you learn a solo, learn the entire song as well.


Come back to creating your own solos when you have enough experience.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Oct 12, 2011,
#5
Quote by GuitarMunky


Melodies, phrasing, dynamics, feel/expression....

It's in the context of music that it all comes together.


+1 to this, also it should be fairly obvious but its worth repeating b/c so many people dont heed it : pay attention to what you're playing and actively think about what you are wanting to do.
#6
Quote by SnowFox234
Heya =)
I tend to just repeat the same lousy tricks.
Cheers.


Learn you music theory: diatonic chord function, borrowing chords, secondary dominants and so on. make sure you know what scales fit over what chord progressions.
Theres a handy ebook with soloing ideas by Les Wise; it's called the 'Bebop Bible'. It's jazz but it will improve your improvising in any other style too.

Try learning solos by guitarists you like and get ideas from them.
Pick those solos right so they are a bit challenging to learn but not too hard.
Try to understand what is going on, why do they play those notes in that place?

It takes time to learn to improvise but you'll get there.
Remember to always use your ear, if it sounds good it is good.
#7
jam with someone,ideas flow better when in group situation,nothing wrong with a few tricks,maybe dont try so hard,play less notes etc,good luck im in the same boat but i am slowly getting better
#8
Find a few guitarists and songs that seem to fit your style. It seems like you might have a blues foundation, so maybe try some AC/DC. And if you want a good female inspiration, try Allison Robertson from The Donnas - very roots rock based.

Listen to the solo, and pick out phrases you like. Look up the tab, and learn how to play that chunk of a solo. For example, the first two measures of the solo for "Highway to Hell" is a classic lick that has been heavily used for decades - think Chuck Berry. Start a solo with that (in A minor), do a few bends on fret 7 of the g string, and end the phrase/measure on either a G (fret 5 of D string) or A (7 of D string). Ending on the G "implies" that there is more solo coming. Ending on the A can mean that your musical "thought" is done. Then do a scale run, and add another modular solo chunk to top it off. Maybe do your scale run and modular solo chunk in A major instead of in the minor (frets 14 & 16 instead of 5 & 7).

This has been a little oversimplified, but by "borrowing" chunks of classic solos, you can transpose them to your desired key and "cut & paste" your own solos together. But don't forget to learn your theory along the way. Learning/pasting chunks is only a way to get you started while you fill in the blanks and the "why" along the way.
#9
One thing to remember is that a solo is just a melody, same as anything else - it's just probably constructed a bit more modularly than the melody of a verse/chorus.

In addition to what everyone else has said, it's a good idea to build tension over a solo and release it at the end. Read up on basic tension/release methods for melodies... some of my favorites are to end on a sustained high note or go from long notes to a flurry of eights/sixteenths, gradually throwing in more notes until I'm going widdly-widdly-wah by the end of the thing. Not that I'm fast enough to do that well, but you get the idea.