#1
Hi People .

Just wanted to make a thread to know how do you guys tune your Floyd Rose guitar(tips and etc').

I mean I can tune it too the tuning i want with flat to the wood bridge and keep it in tune but I'm pretty much new to this and thought maybe you people got some tips for me\us,the new guys who own Floyd system.

Thanks in advance .
#2
Make sure the strings are fully and I mean fully stretched.

Block the trem level (in both directions)

Tune.

Lock down the nut.

Fine tune.

Adjust the claw tension so the trem stays level without the tuning changing when you remove the blocks. --Might have to do an adjustment just to get one of the blocks out.

Just leave the trem cavity cover off and in a safe place. Tape the srews to the cover so they don't get lost. If not, you'll wear out/strip the screw holes within a couple of years.
#3
Basically what jetwash69 said.

Remember though that if you want to adjust the truss rod, action or intonation as well, make sure you do it in the order I've written it in, as for example setting your action then adjusting the truss rod will result in your action going off a bit. You probably want to get all the setting-up done by someone qualified as you're new to the floyd game by the sound of it

Make sure as well that before locking down the top nut, you've set all the fine tuners to the middle of their range, and have tuned them to pitch with the machine heads. This give you more flexibility when you've locked the nut. A bad situation for example would be needing to sharpen the string (because it was flat) and finding that the fine tuner was at its limit and couldn't go any sharper.

Also, make sure you've locked the top nut enough: play an open string, then 'bend' it Behind the nut. If the pitch of the main part of the string changes, you've not tightened the nut enough. It doesn't have to be absolutely 100% level though, in fact clamping too hard can damage not only the strings but also the locking nut itself. Just make sure that it's tight enough for the string to return to proper pitch after any whammy affects. (Though remember that a loose top nut won't necessarily be the only cause of this, if it happens).

Lastly, remember to fine tune After you've adjusted the springs in the back as well: I usually adjust the springs until the higher-pitched strings are in tune, then fine tune the lower strings, as you'll be very lucky to get all the strings coming back up to the Exact pitch they were at before you removed the trem block.

Also make sure you keep the spring claw level - don't have the spring(s) for the bass strings looser than the ones for the treble string(s). By this, I mean keep the two screws that you use to adjust the spring claw screwed in the same distance as each other.

Lastly, definite +1 to the idea of keeping the trem cavity cover off. Saves lots of extra hassle and time, especially useful if you get a problem while playing live.

I think that's enough to be getting on with
#4
Thanks, Gr!t; I left a lot out in my haste to not be late for work; all great points.

Another point doesn't have to do with tuning, but is important for FR nOObs to know, especially if they have cheap LFRs or Edge IIIs:

- If the action adjusts by loosening/tightening the posts, then be sure to always loosen the strings before adjusting the action
-- Otherwise you'll ruin the knife edges
#5
Everything said here is correct. After getting the tuning right initially you'll basically just have to adjust the claw in the back slightly to get back in tune after temperature/moisture changes, et cetera.

For this task I cannot recommend the Schaller Sure Claw enough. It's a very neat little contraption that I'll install in every FR-equipped guitar I'll ever own in my lifetime. It even comes with a pin to mark your spring cavity cover for a drill so you can keep it on and still have access to the adjuster screw. Check it out.

You'll find lots of people claiming that it's a "cure for a problem that doesn't exist", but I really do think it has plenty of merit because you'll definitely need to adjust the springs a little bit just before every show if you start gigging, and if you like to keep the cover on then it'll be a major hassle (even with the Ibanez covers that let you access the spring claw screws).
Last edited by Pikka Bird at Oct 13, 2011,
#6
Thanks People

I know now pretty much a lot about tuning process in FR Huh?.
but there is one thing I'm not sure about,action adjustments.
If I loose the strings,how can i check that I got the action that i wanted to? its again tuning from zero,it would take years to find a good action ain't it?
Cuz i never loosen the strings when i adjust the action.
And what is the "Knife Edge"?
#7
^I've always just adjusted it at full tension. The knives aren't actually sharp (they're like a butter knife edge) so you're not grinding a razor against the post and if your unit is any kind of decent then it'll be no worse off.
If you're turning the posts anyways, now is your chance to rub some chapstick in the notches. It's actually a surprisingly effective method for helping it return to zero if it has problems. And even if it has no problems then it's just for good measure. Nice greasy lubrication is always good with all aspects in life.
#8
Quote by AncientRole
Thanks People

I know now pretty much a lot about tuning process in FR Huh?.
but there is one thing I'm not sure about,action adjustments.
If I loose the strings,how can i check that I got the action that i wanted to? its again tuning from zero,it would take years to find a good action ain't it?
Cuz i never loosen the strings when i adjust the action.
And what is the "Knife Edge"?


The 'Knife Edge' is the pivot around which your trem rotates when you press the bar down - kind of like the hinge it rotates around. Having a thin blade pressed into a notch creates an almost friction-free hinge that doesn't need too much maintenance and can be easily separated into the two parts (in this case, trem and guitar).

Yes, adjusting the action does take while. One way of getting around loosening the strings is instead to pull the whammy up (to increase the tension in the strings and lower the tension in the springs) and remove the springs in the back. You should then be able to remove the whole tremolo unit from the guitar at once, leaving the trem posts free for rotation without blunting/scratching the knife blades. Do this by simply lowering the whammy bar again until the trem basically rotates out of the guitar, leaving the strings and the machine heads untouched (though you may want to unlock the strings at the nut beforehand).

With that done, screw the trem posts in/out a half-turn or so, then replace the bridge (doing the opposite of what you did to remove it). Check your action, if you like it, stick with it, if not, repeat. This method is pretty quick and as long as you don't bang anything while removing the trem, will be totally safe for the guitar, even if it seems a little unorthadox. Good luck!


Pikka Bird - I'm gonna have to disagree with you on the idea of rotating the trem posts under tension. Maybe it's a psychological thing (you expect it to create a problem so therefore you 'find' one), but to me it's simply good practice to keep the working parts in good shape. You wouldn't scrape any real knife blade along a hard steel surface (for example another knife), whether or not the knife was supposed to be sharp in the first place or not.
Can't say anything about the lube though, as I've never used/needed it. Plus I block my trems for dive only so while I never had any return-to-zero problems before I blocked them, I've no need to worry at all now
#9
Lots of people complain about the Edge III sucking. Every case I'm familiar with the trem was fine until someone adjusted the action without removing tension from the strings.

If you follow the instructions for setting action height in the Ibanez book that comes with a new guitar it shouldn't take long because you should be able to calculate the distance of the adjustement--you'll just need a good ruler. That's several hundred dollars cheaper than a replacement trem.

I just pisses me off that it's hard to find a good used guitar with an Edge III because so many people aren't aware of (or blow off) this simple step.

And yeah, Gr!t's shortcut works great, too.

BTW, I got 2 Ibabanezes with the claw screw slots, but I still leave those covers off because they don't give enough access to block the trem for setting the tuning.

And Pikka Bird, that Schaller Sure Claw sounds cool; I'm going to look into it. Those bastards at Schaller--the idea for something like that came to me when I was doing my first post--but looks like Schaller beat me to it. How great would it be if they could add trem-block functionality that could be controlled from there, too?
#10
Quote by Gr!t

Pikka Bird - I'm gonna have to disagree with you on the idea of rotating the trem posts under tension. Maybe it's a psychological thing (you expect it to create a problem so therefore you 'find' one), but to me it's simply good practice to keep the working parts in good shape. You wouldn't scrape any real knife blade along a hard steel surface (for example another knife), whether or not the knife was supposed to be sharp in the first place or not.
Can't say anything about the lube though, as I've never used/needed it. Plus I block my trems for dive only so while I never had any return-to-zero problems before I blocked them, I've no need to worry at all now

Yeah, most people disagree, but in practice it's no different than using eating utensils. You sometimes mash your knife pretty hard into the plate to get through some stubborn bits of a steak and it leaves no marks whatsoever on the knife. There's no harm in being cautious, however. But the lube thing really is a life saver if you've got your Floyd set up for floating. Even very well-maintained Floyds will sometimes be a cent off when returning to zero, and a thick greasy lube will clean that right up.